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Henry IV, Part 1

Henry IV, Part 1 Translation Act 5, Scene 4

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Alarum. Excursions. Enter the KING, PRINCE HENRY, Lord John of LANCASTER, and the Earl of WESTMORELAND

KING

I prithee, Harry, withdraw thyself. Thou bleedest too much.Lord John of Lancaster, go you with him.

KING

Harry, I beg you to withdraw from the battle. You are bleeding too much. Lord John of Lancaster, go with him.

LANCASTER

Not I, my lord, unless I did bleed too.

LANCASTER

My lord, I won't—not unless I am bleeding too.

PRINCE HENRY

I beseech your Majesty, make up,Lest your retirement do amaze your friends.

PRINCE HENRY

Your Majesty, I beg you—please keep your troops moving forward! Your men will be alarmed if they think you are retreating.

KING

I will do so.—My Lord of Westmoreland,Lead him to his tent.

KING

Okay, I will. My Lord of Westmoreland, take him to his tent. 

WESTMORELAND

Come, my lord, I’ll lead you to your tent.

WESTMORELAND

Come on, my lord, I'll take you to your tent.

PRINCE HENRY

Lead me, my lord? I do not need your help, And God forbid a shallow scratch should drive The Prince of Wales from such a field as this, Where stained nobility lies trodden on, And rebels' arms triumph in massacres.

PRINCE HENRY

Take me, my lord? I don't need your help. And I'm certainly not going to let a slight scratch keep The Prince of Wales away from a battlefield like this, where the blood-stained bodies of noblemen are being trampled on, and the rebels and their weapons are triumphing in their attacks.

LANCASTER

We breathe too long. Come, cousin Westmoreland,Our duty this way lies. For God’s sake, come.

LANCASTER

We have taken too long of a break. Come on, Westmoreland; we are needed this way. For God's sake, come on!

Exeunt Lord John of LANCASTER and WESTMORELAND

PRINCE HENRY

By God, thou hast deceived me, Lancaster. I did not think thee lord of such a spirit. Before, I loved thee as a brother, John, But now, I do respect thee as my soul.

PRINCE HENRY

By God, you have deceived me, Lancaster. I didn't think that you had such courage. I used to love you like a brother, John. But now I regard you are my soulmate. 

KING

I saw him hold Lord Percy at the pointWith lustier maintenance than I did look forOf such an ungrown warrior.

KING

Lancaster had Lord Percy at sword's length and act with more aggression than I could have expected from a soldier of his age.

PRINCE HENRY

O, this boy lends mettle to us all.

PRINCE HENRY

Oh, this boy gives us all hope! 

Exit

Enter DOUGLAS

DOUGLAS

Another king! they grow like Hydra’s heads.— I am the Douglas, fatal to all those That wear those colors on them. What art thou That counterfeit’st the person of a king?

DOUGLAS

Another king! They grow like the heads of Hydra! I am Douglas, and I will murder anyone who wears that coat of arms. Who are you, dressed up like the King?

KING

The King himself, who, Douglas, grieves at heart, So many of his shadows thou hast met And not the very king. I have two boys Seek Percy and thyself about the field, But, seeing thou fall’st on me so luckily, I will assay thee. And defend thyself.

KING

I am the King himself. Douglas, it upsets me that you have met so many men disguised as me, without meeting  the true King. I have two sons fighting in this battle who are looking for Percy, and for you. But, since you were lucky enough to find me first, I will fight you now. Defend yourself.

DOUGLAS

I fear thou art another counterfeit, And yet, in faith, thou bear’st thee like a king. But mine I am sure thou art, whoe'er thou be, And thus I win thee.

DOUGLAS

I am still worried that you are just another fake, and yet it must be said that you do behave like a king. Whoever you are, you are mine, and I will defeat you. 

They fight. The KING being in danger, enter PRINCE HENRY of Wales

PRINCE HENRY

Hold up thy head, vile Scot, or thou art like Never to hold it up again. The spirits Of valiant Shirley, Stafford, Blunt are in my arms. It is the Prince of Wales that threatens thee, Who never promiseth but he means to pay.

PRINCE HENRY

Look at me, you vile Scotsman, or you will never look at anyone again. The spirits of brave Shirley, Stafford, and Blunt empower me. It is the Prince of Wales who threatens you, and I will always fulfill the promises I make.

They fight. DOUGLAS flieth

Cheerly, my lord. How fares your Grace?Sir Nicholas Gawsey hath for succor sent,And so hath Clifton. I’ll to Clifton straight.

[To KING Henry] Cheer up, my lord! How are you feeling, your Grace? Sir Nicholas Gawsey has sent for help, and so has Clifton. I will go and help Clifton.

KING

Stay, and breathe awhile. Thou hast redeemed thy lost opinion And showed thou mak’st some tender of my life In this fair rescue thou hast brought to me.

KING

Stay here, and rest for a while. You have redeemed your awful reputation, and by rescuing me, you have shown that you do care about my life. 

PRINCE HENRY

O God, they did me too much injury That ever said I hearkened for your death. If it were so, I might have let alone The insulting hand of Douglas over you, Which would have been as speedy in your end As all the poisonous potions in the world, And saved the treacherous labor of your son.

PRINCE HENRY

Oh God! Anyone who said that I wanted you to die has done me a great offense. If I had wanted you to die, I would have left you to fight against Douglas alone. That would have guaranteed your death quicker than any poisons in this world, and saved me from having to do anything treacherous.

KING

Make up to Clifton. I’ll to Sir Nicholas Gawsey.

KING

Go to Clifton.  I'll go to Sir Nicholas Gawsey. 

Exit the KING

Enter HOTSPUR

HOTSPUR

If I mistake not, thou art Harry Monmouth.

HOTSPUR

If I am not mistaken, you are Harry Monmouth.

PRINCE HENRY

Thou speak’st as if I would deny my name.

PRINCE HENRY

You speak like I would deny my own name.

HOTSPUR

My name is Harry Percy.

HOTSPUR

My name is Harry Percy.

PRINCE HENRY

Why, then I see A very valiant rebel of the name. I am the Prince of Wales; and think not, Percy, To share with me in glory any more. Two stars keep not their motion in one sphere, Nor can one England brook a double reign, Of Harry Percy and the Prince of Wales.

PRINCE HENRY

Why then, you must be the brave rebel I am looking for with the same name. I am the Prince of Wales and you can't share in my glory any longer, Percy. Two stars can't fit into one orbit, and likewise, England can't handle a double reign, with both Harry Percy and the Prince of Wales in charge.

HOTSPUR

Nor shall it, Harry, for the hour is comeTo end the one of us, and would to GodThy name in arms were now as great as mine.

HOTSPUR

Well it won't have to, Harry. For it is time for one of us to die. If only your reputation for fighting was as good as mine is. 

PRINCE HENRY

I’ll make it greater ere I part from thee,And all the budding honors on thy crestI’ll crop, to make a garland for my head.

PRINCE HENRY

My reputation will greatly improve before we part today. I am going to pick all of the tokens from your helmet, and make them into a wreath for my head. 

HOTSPUR

I can no longer brook thy vanities.

HOTSPUR

I can't listen to any more of your vain boasts. 

They fight

Enter FALSTAFF

FALSTAFF

Well said, Hal! To it Hal! Nay, you shall find no boys'play here, I can tell you.

FALSTAFF

Well done, Hal! Keep it up! This is no child's play, I can tell you that. 

Enter DOUGLAS. He fighteth with FALSTAFF, who falls down as if he were ead.

Exit DOUGLAS

PRINCE HENRY killeth HOTSPUR

HOTSPUR

O Harry, thou hast robbed me of my youth. I better brook the loss of brittle life Than those proud titles thou hast won of me. They wound my thoughts worse than thy sword my flesh. But thoughts, the slave of life, and life, time’s fool, And time, that takes survey of all the world, Must have a stop. O, I could prophesy, But that the earthy and cold hand of death Lies on my tongue. No, Percy, thou art dust, And food for— (he dies)

HOTSPUR

Oh, Harry, you have taken away my youth. I can handle the fact that my fragile life is over, but I can't deal with all of the honors you have won from me. The thought of that hurts me more than the physical wound your sword has left. Thoughts need life, life depends on time, and even time, which watches over our world, has to have an end. Oh, I could tell prophecies, but the pale and cold hand of death stops me from talking. No, Percy. You are dust, and food for— [He dies] 

PRINCE HENRY

For worms, brave Percy. Fare thee well, great heart. Ill-weaved ambition, how much art thou shrunk! When that this body did contain a spirit, A kingdom for it was too small a bound, But now two paces of the vilest earth Is room enough. This earth that bears thee dead Bears not alive so stout a gentleman. If thou wert sensible of courtesy, I should not make so dear a show of zeal. But let my favors hide thy mangled face; And even in thy behalf I’ll thank myself For doing these fair rites of tenderness. Adieu, and take thy praise with thee to heaven. Thy ignominy sleep with thee in the grave, But not remembered in thy epitaph.

PRINCE HENRY

For worms, brave Percy. Goodbye, brave thing. It's amazing how much your excessive ambition has already shrunk! When that body was alive, a whole kingdom wasn't even enough to contain your ambition. But now this small patch of dirty ground is enough room. The same ground that your dead body lies upon doesn't have a single living man on it who is anywhere near as brave as you. If you were able to hear these compliments, I wouldn't be so enthusiastic in giving you them. But now I will cover your injured face with my scarf, and I will thank myself on your behalf for doing these acts of respect. Farewell, and I hope you can take your praises with you to heaven! Let your shame stay with you in your grave, but keep it away from your tombstone.

He spieth FALSTAFF on the ground

What, old acquaintance, could not all this flesh Keep in a little life? Poor Jack, farewell. I could have better spared a better man. O, I should have a heavy miss of thee If I were much in love with vanity. Death hath not struck so fat a deer today, Though many dearer in this bloody fray. Emboweled will I see thee by and by; Till then in blood by noble Percy lie.

What? My old friend? Even with all of this flesh, you couldn't manage to hold on to a little bit of life? Poor Jack, goodbye. I would rather have lost a better soldier than lost you. Oh, I would really miss you, if I were in love with vanity. Death hasn't claimed anyone as fat as you today, but this battle has claimed many men more noble than you. I will make sure that you are disemboweled soon; until then, lie here next to the noble Percy in his blood. 

Exit PRINCE HENRY

FALSTAFF riseth up

FALSTAFF

Emboweled? If thou embowel me today, I’ll give you leave to powder me and eat me too tomorrow. 'Sblood, ’twas time to counterfeit, or that hot termagant Scot had paid me scot and lot too. Counterfeit? I lie. I am no counterfeit. To die is to be a counterfeit, for he isbut the counterfeit of a man who hath not the life of aman; but to counterfeit dying when a man thereby livethis to be no counterfeit, but the true and perfect imageof life indeed. The better part of valor is discretion,in the which better part I have saved my life. Zounds, I am afraid of this gunpowder Percy, though he be dead. How if he should counterfeit too and rise? By my faith, I am afraid he would prove the better counterfeit. Therefore I’ll make him sure, yea, and I’ll swear I killed him. Why may not he rise as well as I? Nothing confutes me but eyes, and nobody sees me. Therefore, sirrah, (stabs the body) with a new wound in your thigh,come you along with me. (he takes up HOTSPUR on his back)

FALSTAFF

Disemboweled? If you disembowel me today, I'll let you preserve my body in salt and eat me for dinner tomorrow! God, I had to pretend to be dead, or that savage Scotsman would have definitely killed me. A fake? No, I am not a fake. To die is to be a faker, because a dead body is an impersonation of a living one. However, pretending to be dead when you are actually alive is not being a faker, but is actually being the best kind of living person you can be. The most important thing about bravery is being careful with it, and by being careful, I saved my life. Heavens, I am still afraid this explosive Percy, even though he is dead. What if he's faking too, and he just gets up? I reckon he'd be a better faker than I was. So, I'll just make sure he's dead, and then I can say that I killed him. Why couldn't he just get up, like I did? No-one could deny this but me, and there is no-one else here. Therefore, sir, [He stabs the body] with this new wound in your thigh you are coming with me. [He picks up HOTSPUR and carries him on his back]

Enter PRINCE HENRY and Lord John of LANCASTER

PRINCE HENRY

Come, brother John. Full bravely hast thou fleshedThy maiden sword.

PRINCE HENRY

Come on John, my brother. You have fought very bravely in your first battle.

LANCASTER

But soft, whom have we here?Did you not tell me this fat man was dead?

LANCASTER

Hang on, who do we have here? Didn't you tell me that this fat man was dead?

PRINCE HENRY

I did; I saw him dead, Breathless and bleeding on the ground.— Art thou alive? Or is it fantasy that plays upon our eyesight? I prithee, speak. We will not trust our eyes Without our ears. Thou art not what thou seem’st.

PRINCE HENRY

I did. I saw him dead, breathless and bleeding on the ground. 

 [To FALSTAFF]  Are you alive? Or is this some kind of illusion, playing  tricks on our eyes? Please, speak to us. We won't trust what we see unless we also hear your voice. You are not what you seem.

FALSTAFF

No, that’s certain. I am not a double man. But if I be not Jack Falstaff, then am I a jack. There is Percy. If your father will do me any honor, so; if not, let him kill the next Percy himself. I look to be either earl orduke, I can assure you.

FALSTAFF

No, that's for certain. I am not an apparition. But if I am not Jack Falstaff, then I'm a villain. Here is Percy. If your father will give me the honor I deserve, let him do so. If not, let him kill the next Percy himself. I expect to be made either an earl or a duke, that's for sure.

PRINCE HENRY

Why, Percy I killed myself, and saw thee dead.

PRINCE HENRY

I killed Percy myself, and I saw you dead on the ground. 

FALSTAFF

Didst thou? Lord, Lord, how this world is given to lying. I grant you, Iwas down and out of breath, and so was he, but we rose both at an instant and fought a longhour by Shrewsbury clock. If I may be believed, so; if not, let them that should reward valor bear the sin upontheir own heads. I’ll take it upon my death, I gave himthis wound in the thigh. If the man were alive and would deny it, zounds, I would make him eat a piece of my sword.

FALSTAFF

Did you? Lord, Lord! How people love to lie. I will admit, I fell down and was out of breath and so was he. But we both got up at the same time and fought each other for a long hour according to the Shrewsbury clock. If you believe me, great. If not, let the people that don't believe me feel guilty for not giving me the honor I deserve for my bravery. I swear on my life, I gave him this wound in his thigh. If Percy was alive and denied it, heavens, I would make him eat a bit of my sword. 

LANCASTER

This is the strangest tale that ever I heard.

LANCASTER

This is the strangest story I've ever heard.

PRINCE HENRY

This is the strangest fellow, brother John.—Come, bring your luggage nobly on your back.For my part, if a lie may do thee grace,I’ll gild it with the happiest terms I have.

PRINCE HENRY

This is the strangest man alive, brother John. Come on then, carry that body with pride on your back. As for me, if lying is going to help your case, then I will support you however I can. 

A retreat is sounded

The trumpet sounds retreat; the day is ours.Come, brother, let us to the highest of the fieldTo see what friends are living, who are dead.

The trumpet calls for a retreat; we must have won! Come on, brother, let's get to the top of the hill and see which of our friends are still alive and which are dead.

Exeunt PRINCE HENRY and Lord John of LANCASTER

FALSTAFF

I’ll follow, as they say, for reward. He that rewards me, God reward him. If I do grow great, I’ll grow less, for I’ll purge and leave sack and live cleanly as a nobleman should do.

FALSTAFF

I'll follow them, but only to get my reward. Let God reward whoever rewards me. If I become a powerful nobleman, I'll get thinner. I'll diet, stop drinking, and live a good, clean life like a nobleman should.

Exit

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Lani strange
About the Translator: Lani Strange

Lani is currently studying for an MA in Shakespeare Studies at King's College London and Shakespeare's Globe. She has a BA in English and Latin Literature from the University of Warwick and worked as a Teacher of Drama for a year in between her undergraduate and postgraduate degrees. She has a love for all things theatrical and spends all of her free time either watching theatre or taking part in it herself.