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Henry VI, Part 1

Henry VI, Part 1 Translation Act 3, Scene 3

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Enter CHARLES, the BASTARD OF ORLEANS, ALENCON, JOAN LA PUCELLE, and forces

JOAN LA PUCELLE

Dismay not, princes, at this accident, Nor grieve that Rouen is so recovered: Care is no cure, but rather corrosive, For things that are not to be remedied. Let frantic Talbot triumph for a while And like a peacock sweep along his tail; We'll pull his plumes and take away his train, If Dauphin and the rest will be but ruled.

JOAN LA PUCELLE

Princes, don't despair over this unpredictable event. And don't grieve that they took back Rouen. Caring about it won't help us, but will make it even worse, for the things that have happened cannot be changed. Let the excited Talbot celebrate his victory, like a peacock swinging his tail around, for a while. We'll tear his feathers and take away his tail, so long as the Dauphin and the rest of you follow my advice.

CHARLES

We have been guided by thee hitherto,And of thy cunning had no diffidence:One sudden foil shall never breed distrust.

CHARLES

We have been guided by you until now and have not once mistrusted your magical powers. One unexpected defeat won't make us stop believing in you. 

BASTARD OF ORLEANS

Search out thy wit for secret policies,And we will make thee famous through the world.

BASTARD OF ORLEANS

Think of some surprise strategies and we will make you famous around the world.

ALENCON

We'll set thy statue in some holy place,And have thee reverenced like a blessed saint:Employ thee then, sweet virgin, for our good.

ALENCON

We'll put up a statue of you in some holy place. And we'll worship you like a blessed saint. Do your best, sweet virgin, for our sake.

JOAN LA PUCELLE

Then thus it must be; this doth Joan devise: By fair persuasions mix'd with sugar'd words We will entice the Duke of Burgundy To leave the Talbot and to follow us.

JOAN LA PUCELLE

Then it must be so. Joan plans to persuade the Duke of Burgundy with sweet words and convince him to leave Talbot and follow us instead. 

CHARLES

Ay, marry, sweeting, if we could do that, France were no place for Henry's warriors; Nor should that nation boast it so with us, But be extirped from our provinces.

CHARLES

Ah, my darling! If we could do that, there would be no place for Henry's warriors in France. And England would not show off in front of us, but instead would be removed from our provinces. 

ALENCON

For ever should they be expulsed from FranceAnd not have title of an earldom here.

ALENCON

They should be expelled from France forever and not hold any title here. 

JOAN LA PUCELLE

Your honours shall perceive how I will workTo bring this matter to the wished end.

JOAN LA PUCELLE

Your honors will observe how I plan to carry this out until we achieve what we want. 

Drum sounds afar off

JOAN LA PUCELLE

Hark! by the sound of drum you may perceiveTheir powers are marching unto Paris-ward.

JOAN LA PUCELLE

Listen! That sound of the drum tells us that their armies are marching towards Paris. 

Here sound an English march. Enter, and pass over at a distance, TALBOT and his forces

JOAN LA PUCELLE

There goes the Talbot, with his colours spread,And all the troops of English after him.

JOAN LA PUCELLE

There goes Talbot, carrying his flags, and all the English soldiers are following after him. 

French march. Enter BURGUNDY and forces

JOAN LA PUCELLE

Now in the rearward comes the duke and his:Fortune in favour makes him lag behind.Summon a parley; we will talk with him.

JOAN LA PUCELLE

Now at the back comes the duke and his luck makes him fall behind, which is good for us. Ask to negotiate and we'll talk to him.

Trumpets sound a parley

CHARLES

A parley with the Duke of Burgundy!

CHARLES

We want to negotiate with the Duke of Burgundy!

BURGUNDY

Who craves a parley with the Burgundy?

BURGUNDY

Who wants to negotiate with Burgundy?

JOAN LA PUCELLE

The princely Charles of France, thy countryman.

JOAN LA PUCELLE

The prince Charles of France, your countryman.

BURGUNDY

What say'st thou, Charles? for I am marching hence.

BURGUNDY

What do you have to say to me, Charles? See, I am walking towards you now. 

CHARLES

Speak, Pucelle, and enchant him with thy words.

CHARLES

Pucelle, speak and bewitch him with your words.

JOAN LA PUCELLE

Brave Burgundy, undoubted hope of France!Stay, let thy humble handmaid speak to thee.

JOAN LA PUCELLE

Brave Burgundy, you are the unquestionable hope of France! Stay here and let me—your lowly servant girl speak to you.

BURGUNDY

Speak on; but be not over-tedious.

BURGUNDY

Speak then. But don't speak too much. 

JOAN LA PUCELLE

Look on thy country, look on fertile France, And see the cities and the towns defaced By wasting ruin of the cruel foe. As looks the mother on her lowly babe When death doth close his tender dying eyes, See, see the pining malady of France; Behold the wounds, the most unnatural wounds, Which thou thyself hast given her woful breast. O, turn thy edged sword another way; Strike those that hurt, and hurt not those that help. One drop of blood drawn from thy country's bosom Should grieve thee more than streams of foreign gore: Return thee therefore with a flood of tears, And wash away thy country's stained spots.

JOAN LA PUCELLE

Look at your country, look at fruitful France and see that the cities and towns are destroyed by the destructive ruin of its cruel enemy. Look at the wasting French disease as if you were a mother looking at her poor baby when death is closing his young dying eyes. See the wounds, the most unnatural wounds, which you yourself have given her miserable breasts. Oh, turn your sharp sword in another direction! Attack those who hurt and don't hurt those who help. One drop of blood from your country's breasts should make you more miserable than rivers of foreign blood. Return with a flood of tears and wash away the staining spots of your country. 

BURGUNDY

Either she hath bewitch'd me with her words,Or nature makes me suddenly relent.

BURGUNDY

She has either charmed me with her words or nature suddenly makes me regret everything. 

JOAN LA PUCELLE

Besides, all French and France exclaims on thee, Doubting thy birth and lawful progeny. Who joint'st thou with but with a lordly nation That will not trust thee but for profit's sake? When Talbot hath set footing once in France And fashion'd thee that instrument of ill, Who then but English Henry will be lord And thou be thrust out like a fugitive? Call we to mind, and mark but this for proof, Was not the Duke of Orleans thy foe? And was he not in England prisoner? But when they heard he was thine enemy, They set him free without his ransom paid, In spite of Burgundy and all his friends. See, then, thou fight'st against thy countrymen And joint'st with them will be thy slaughtermen. Come, come, return; return, thou wandering lord: Charles and the rest will take thee in their arms.

JOAN LA PUCELLE

Also, all the French and France accuse you, they are doubting your birth and the legitimacy of your lineage. And you join a proud nation that only trusts you for the sake of profit? Once Talbot has set up a base in France and made you into that tool of destruction, who but the English Henry will be lord and you will be cast away like a refugee! Let's use an example. Do you remember your enemy the Duke of Orleans? Wasn't he prisoner in England? But when they heard that he was your enemy, they let him go and they didn't pay for his release, despite Burgundy and all his friends. Can you see, then, that you fight against your countrymen, and when you join with them they will become your murderers. Come here! Come back, come back, you restless lord. Charles and the others will welcome you into their arms. 

BURGUNDY

I am vanquished; these haughty words of hers Have batter'd me like roaring cannon-shot, And made me almost yield upon my knees. Forgive me, country, and sweet countrymen, And, lords, accept this hearty kind embrace: My forces and my power of men are yours: So farewell, Talbot; I'll no longer trust thee.

BURGUNDY

I am defeated. Her arrogant words have beaten me like a loud shot from a cannon. They made me almost fall down onto my knees. Forgive me, my country and my sweet countrymen! And lords, accept this sincere kind embrace. My army is yours. So, goodbye Talbot! I don't trust you anymore. 

JOAN LA PUCELLE

[Aside] Done like a Frenchman: turn, and turn again!

JOAN LA PUCELLE

[To herself] He's like a Frenchman! He turns and then turns again. 

CHARLES

Welcome, brave duke! thy friendship makes us fresh.

CHARLES

Welcome, brave duke! Your friendship renews us. 

BASTARD OF ORLEANS

And doth beget new courage in our breasts.

BASTARD OF ORLEANS

And it makes us feel new courage in our chests. 

ALENCON

Pucelle hath bravely play'd her part in this,And doth deserve a coronet of gold.

ALENCON

Pucelle has played her part in this splendidly. She deserves a golden crown.

CHARLES

Now let us on, my lords, and join our powers,And seek how we may prejudice the foe.

CHARLES

Let's go now, my lords. And let's combine our powers and find out how we may damage the enemy. 

Exeunt

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Nina romancikova
About the Translator: Nina Romancikova

Nina Romancikova is from Slovakia but her love of literature and theater has brought her to the UK and she has been living and studying there for the past six years. She graduated with a degree in English Literature and Language at University of Glasgow in 2016. Nina is now finishing her Masters in Shakespeare Studies at King's College London and is currently working as a Research Intern at Shakespeare's Globe.