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Henry VI, Part 3

Henry VI, Part 3 Translation Act 2, Scene 3

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Alarum. Excursions. Enter WARWICK

WARWICK

Forspent with toil, as runners with a race, I lay me down a little while to breathe; For strokes received, and many blows repaid, Have robb'd my strong-knit sinews of their strength, And spite of spite needs must I rest awhile.

WARWICK

I am exhausted from all the fighting, like runners are exhausted after a race. I'll lay down a little to catch my breath. The hits I received, and the ones that I gave in return, have tired out my strong muscles, and come what may, I have to rest for a while. 

Enter EDWARD, running

EDWARD

Smile, gentle heaven! Or strike, ungentle death!For this world frowns, and Edward's sun is clouded.

EDWARD

Smile on us, kind heaven! Or strike us down, you unkind death! Because this world is frowning and the sun that represents me is clouded with darkness. 

WARWICK

How now, my lord! What hap? What hope of good?

WARWICK

What's happening, my lord? What luck? Do we have hope for a happy outcome?

Enter GEORGE

GEORGE

Our hap is loss, our hope but sad despair;Our ranks are broke, and ruin follows us:What counsel give you? Whither shall we fly?

GEORGE

Our luck is gone and our hope is only sad desperation. They got through the first row of our soldiers and so we're ruined. What advice do you give us? Where should we run?

EDWARD

Bootless is flight, they follow us with wings;And weak we are and cannot shun pursuit.

EDWARD

Running away is pointless. They'll follow us as if they have wings. And we are weak and can't escape their pursuit. 

Enter RICHARD

RICHARD

Ah, Warwick, why hast thou withdrawn thyself? Thy brother's blood the thirsty earth hath drunk, Broach'd with the steely point of Clifford's lance; And in the very pangs of death he cried, Like to a dismal clangour heard from far, 'Warwick, revenge! brother, revenge my death!' So, underneath the belly of their steeds, That stain'd their fetlocks in his smoking blood, The noble gentleman gave up the ghost.

RICHARD

Ah, Warwick! Why have you left the fighting? The thirsty earth is now soaked with your brother's blood. He was pierced by Clifford's spear. And when he was dying he shouted, as if an ominous ringing heard from far away, "Warwick, revenge me! Brother, revenge my death!" And so, under the horse's belly, with the horse's legs stained with your brother's streaming blood, the noble gentleman died. 

WARWICK

Then let the earth be drunken with our blood: I'll kill my horse, because I will not fly. Why stand we like soft-hearted women here, Wailing our losses, whiles the foe doth rage; And look upon, as if the tragedy Were play'd in jest by counterfeiting actors? Here on my knee I vow to God above, I'll never pause again, never stand still, Till either death hath closed these eyes of mine Or fortune given me measure of revenge.

WARWICK

Then let the earth drown in our blood. I'll kill my horse because I will not run away. Why do we stand here like weak women, crying over what we lost, while our enemies are in a frenzy? Why do we look on it all as if the tragedy was only make-believe, performed by actors playing pretend? I go down on my knee now and swear to God above that I'll never stop again, I'll never stand still, until either death closes my eyes or I get to take my revenge, if fate allows it. 

EDWARD

O Warwick, I do bend my knee with thine; And in this vow do chain my soul to thine! And, ere my knee rise from the earth's cold face, I throw my hands, mine eyes, my heart to thee, Thou setter up and plucker down of kings, Beseeching Thee, if with Thy will it stands That to my foes this body must be prey, Yet that thy brazen gates of heaven may ope, And give sweet passage to my sinful soul! Now, lords, take leave until we meet again, Where'er it be, in heaven or in earth.

EDWARD

Oh, Warwick! I go down on my knees with you and I swear to join my soul with yours! And before I rise from the cold ground, I give over my hands, my eyes, and my heart to my God who establishes and removes kings. I beg you, God, if its your will agree that my body must become prey for my enemies that your brass gates of heaven may open allow in  my sinful soul! Now, lords, you can go until we meet again. Wherever that may be, in heaven or on earth. 

RICHARD

Brother, give me thy hand; and, gentle Warwick,Let me embrace thee in my weary arms:I, that did never weep, now melt with woeThat winter should cut off our spring-time so.

RICHARD

Give me your hand, brother. And kind Warwick, let me embrace you with my weak arms. I that have never cried am now melting with sorrow at the fact that we should be separated so soon. 

WARWICK

Away, away! Once more, sweet lords farewell.

WARWICK

Let's go, let's go! Once more goodbye, sweet lords. 

GEORGE

Yet let us all together to our troops, And give them leave to fly that will not stay; And call them pillars that will stand to us; And, if we thrive, promise them such rewards As victors wear at the Olympian games: This may plant courage in their quailing breasts; For yet is hope of life and victory. Forslow no longer, make we hence amain.

GEORGE

Let us all go together to our soldiers and tell those who don't want to stay to run away. If they'll stand next to us and support us, we'll call them pillars. And, if we are successful, we'll promise them rewards like the winners wear at the Olympic Games. This may give them courage in their quivering hearts since there is still hope of life and victory. Let's not delay. Let's go speedily!

Exeunt

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Nina romancikova
About the Translator: Nina Romancikova

Nina Romancikova is from Slovakia but her love of literature and theater has brought her to the UK and she has been living and studying there for the past six years. She graduated with a degree in English Literature and Language at University of Glasgow in 2016. Nina is now finishing her Masters in Shakespeare Studies at King's College London and is currently working as a Research Intern at Shakespeare's Globe.