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Henry VI, Part 3

Henry VI, Part 3 Translation Act 4, Scene 1

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Enter GLOUCESTER, CLARENCE, SOMERSET, and MONTAGUE

GLOUCESTER

Now tell me, brother Clarence, what think youOf this new marriage with the Lady Grey?Hath not our brother made a worthy choice?

GLOUCESTER

Now tell me, brother Clarence, what do you think of this new marriage between Edward and Lady Grey? Don't you think our brother chose well?

CLARENCE

Alas, you know, 'tis far from hence to France;How could he stay till Warwick made return?

CLARENCE

Alas, you know, it is far from here to France. I guess he just couldn't possibly have waited to get married until Warwick returned

SOMERSET

My lords, forbear this talk; here comes the king.

SOMERSET

Don't talk about this now, my lords. Here comes the king.

GLOUCESTER

And his well-chosen bride.

GLOUCESTER

And his well-chosen bride.

CLARENCE

I mind to tell him plainly what I think.

CLARENCE

I intend to tell him simply what I think of this.

Flourish. Enter KING EDWARD IV, attended; QUEEN ELIZABETH, PEMBROKE, STAFFORD, HASTINGS, and others

KING EDWARD IV

Now, brother of Clarence, how like you our choice,That you stand pensive, as half malcontent?

KING EDWARD IV

Clarence, brother, now how do you like our choice, since you're standing there looking so thoughtful as if you were partly dissatisfied?

CLARENCE

As well as Lewis of France, or the Earl of Warwick,Which are so weak of courage and in judgmentThat they'll take no offence at our abuse.

CLARENCE

I like it as well as King Lewis of France or the Earl of Warwick, who have such little courage or sense that they surely won't be offended by this insult to them. 

KING EDWARD IV

Suppose they take offence without a cause,They are but Lewis and Warwick: I am Edward,Your king and Warwick's, and must have my will.

KING EDWARD IV

Maybe they are insulted without a reason. They are only Lewis and Warwick, after all. I am Edward, your king and Warwick's king, too. And my wishes must be fulfilled. 

GLOUCESTER

And shall have your will, because our king:Yet hasty marriage seldom proveth well.

GLOUCESTER

And you will have your wishes fulfilled because you're the king. Still, quick marriages rarely turn out well. 

KING EDWARD IV

Yea, brother Richard, are you offended too?

KING EDWARD IV

Okay, Richard, my brother. Are you insulted too?

GLOUCESTER

Not I:No, God forbid that I should wish them sever'dWhom God hath join'd together; ay, and 'twere pityTo sunder them that yoke so well together.

GLOUCESTER

Not me! No, God forbid that I would want two lovebirds joined by God to be separated. Yes, and it would be a shame to break apart a pair that goes together so well. 

KING EDWARD IV

Setting your scorns and your mislike aside, Tell me some reason why the Lady Grey Should not become my wife and England's queen. And you too, Somerset and Montague, Speak freely what you think.

KING EDWARD IV

Putting your mockery and your displeasure on one side for a moment, tell me any reason why the Lady Grey shouldn't become my wife and Queen of England. And you too, Somerset and Montague, tell me freely what you think. 

CLARENCE

Then this is mine opinion: that King LewisBecomes your enemy, for mocking himAbout the marriage of the Lady Bona.

CLARENCE

Then this is my opinion: King Lewis will become your enemy because you humiliated him by not marrying Lady Bona. 

GLOUCESTER

And Warwick, doing what you gave in charge,Is now dishonoured by this new marriage.

GLOUCESTER

And Warwick, who was only doing what you told him to do, now feels dishonored by this new marriage.

KING EDWARD IV

What if both Lewis and Warwick be appeasedBy such invention as I can devise?

KING EDWARD IV

What if both Lewis and Warwick could be calmed down by a plan that I come up with?

MONTAGUE

Yet, to have join'd with France in such allianceWould more have strengthen'd this our commonwealth'Gainst foreign storms than any home-bred marriage.

MONTAGUE

Yet, if we had joined with France in this alliance, it would have strengthened our kingdom against foreign enemies more than any marriage made at home could do.

HASTINGS

Why, knows not Montague that of itselfEngland is safe, if true within itself?

HASTINGS

Yes, but doesn't you know, Montague, that England can be safe alone if it stays purely English?

MONTAGUE

But the safer when 'tis back'd with France.

MONTAGUE

But it is safer when it is supported by France.

HASTINGS

'Tis better using France than trusting France: Let us be back'd with God and with the seas Which He hath given for fence impregnable, And with their helps only defend ourselves; In them and in ourselves our safety lies.

HASTINGS

It's better to use France than to trust France. Let us be supported by God and by the seas around us which he has given us as a strong defense.  With that help alone we can defend ourselves. Our safety relies on that help and in ourselves.

CLARENCE

For this one speech Lord Hastings well deservesTo have the heir of the Lord Hungerford.

CLARENCE

Lord Hastings really deserves to marry a wealthy noblewoman just for that speech alone. 

KING EDWARD IV

Ay, what of that? It was my will and grant;And for this once my will shall stand for law.

KING EDWARD IV

Oh, why do you bring that up? It was what I wanted and commanded, and what I say in this case is the law. 

GLOUCESTER

And yet methinks your grace hath not done well, To give the heir and daughter of Lord Scales Unto the brother of your loving bride; She better would have fitted me or Clarence: But in your bride you bury brotherhood.

GLOUCESTER

But I think that your grace hasn't done very well in this case to marry the heir and daughter of Lord Scales to your loving bride's brother. She would have been a better fit for me or Clarence. But you abandon your brothers for your wife. 

CLARENCE

Or else you would not have bestow'd the heirOf the Lord Bonville on your new wife's son,And leave your brothers to go speed elsewhere.

CLARENCE

Or otherwise you wouldn't have betrothed the daughter of Lord Bonville to your new stepson, leaving your brothers to try their luck elsewhere. 

KING EDWARD IV

Alas, poor Clarence! Is it for a wifeThat thou art malcontent? I will provide thee.

KING EDWARD IV

Ah, poor Clarence! Are you dissatisfied because you want a wife so badly? I will get you one.

CLARENCE

In choosing for yourself, you show'd your judgment,Which being shallow, you give me leaveTo play the broker in mine own behalf;And to that end I shortly mind to leave you.

CLARENCE

You showed us your judgment in choosing wives when you chose one for yourself. And since that judgment was unimpressive, I'm going to ahead and play matchmaker for myself. And in order to do that, I'm planning to leave you shortly. 

KING EDWARD IV

Leave me, or tarry, Edward will be king,And not be tied unto his brother's will.

KING EDWARD IV

Leave me or stay, but I will still be king, and won't be tied to my brother's wishes. 

QUEEN ELIZABETH

My lords, before it pleased his majesty To raise my state to title of a queen, Do me but right, and you must all confess That I was not ignoble of descent; And meaner than myself have had like fortune. But as this title honours me and mine, So your dislike, to whom I would be pleasing, Doth cloud my joys with danger and with sorrow.

QUEEN ELIZABETH

My lords, even before his majesty decided to raise me up to be the queen, you'd do right by me to admit that I already was from a noble family. Those of worse-born families have had my luck before me. But just as this title honors me and my family, your disapproval distracts me from my joy with thoughts of danger and sorrow because I want to please you. 

KING EDWARD IV

My love, forbear to fawn upon their frowns: What danger or what sorrow can befall thee, So long as Edward is thy constant friend, And their true sovereign, whom they must obey? Nay, whom they shall obey, and love thee too, Unless they seek for hatred at my hands; Which if they do, yet will I keep thee safe, And they shall feel the vengeance of my wrath.

KING EDWARD IV

My love, keep showing your affection for them even when they're frowning at you. What danger or tragedy can happen to you as long as I am loyal to you and serve as their ruler whom they must obey? Yes, they will obey me and love you, unless they want me to hate them. If they do, I'll stay loyal to you and keep you safe and they will experience my vengeful wrath. 

GLOUCESTER

[Aside] I hear, yet say not much, but think the more.

GLOUCESTER

[To himself] I listen, but I don't say much, but I keep thinking. 

Enter a Post

KING EDWARD IV

Now, messenger, what letters or what newsFrom France?

KING EDWARD IV

Now, messenger, what letters or news do you bring from France?

POST

My sovereign liege, no letters; and few words,But such as I, without your special pardon,Dare not relate.

MESSENGER

My royal lord, I bring no letters. I don't have many words either, but I don't dare to say them without your special permission. 

KING EDWARD IV

Go to, we pardon thee: therefore, in brief,Tell me their words as near as thou canst guess them.What answer makes King Lewis unto our letters?

KING EDWARD IV

Go on, I give you permission. So, tell me quickly the words as closely as you can remember them. How does King Lewis respond to my letters?

POST

At my depart, these were his very words:'Go tell false Edward, thy supposed king,That Lewis of France is sending over masquersTo revel it with him and his new bride.'

MESSENGER

When I was leaving, these were his exact words: "Go tell the false Edward, your so-called king, that Lewis of France is sending over masque performers to celebrate with him and his new bride."

KING EDWARD IV

Is Lewis so brave? Belike he thinks me Henry.But what said Lady Bona to my marriage?

KING EDWARD IV

Is Lewis so boldly rude? Maybe he thinks I'm like Henry. But what did Lady Bona say about my marriage?

POST

These were her words, utter'd with mad disdain:'Tell him, in hope he'll prove a widower shortly,I'll wear the willow garland for his sake.'

MESSENGER

These were her words, spoken with mad anger: "Tell him I'll wear a willow garland, the sign of a lover who's been thrown aside, in hopes that he'll soon be widowed."

KING EDWARD IV

I blame not her, she could say little less;She had the wrong. But what said Henry's queen?For I have heard that she was there in place.

KING EDWARD IV

I don't blame her because she couldn't say anything different. She was wronged. But what did Henry's queen say? Because I heard that she was there too.

POST

'Tell him,' quoth she, 'my mourning weeds are done,And I am ready to put armour on.'

MESSENGER

"Tell him," she said, "that my mourning clothes have been cast aside and I am ready to put on my armor."

KING EDWARD IV

Belike she minds to play the Amazon.But what said Warwick to these injuries?

KING EDWARD IV

Maybe she intends to act like a wild Amazon warrior. What did Warwick say about these insults?

POST

He, more incensed against your majestyThan all the rest, discharged me with these words:'Tell him from me that he hath done me wrong,And therefore I'll uncrown him ere't be long.'

MESSENGER

He was more furious at your majesty than anyone else, and he dismissed me with these words: "Tell him from me that he has wronged me and that's why I'll take away his crown before too long."

KING EDWARD IV

Ha! durst the traitor breathe out so proud words?Well I will arm me, being thus forewarn'd:They shall have wars and pay for their presumption.But say, is Warwick friends with Margaret?

KING EDWARD IV

Ha! Did the traitor speak these proud words? Well, I will put armor on since I've been warned. They shall have wars and pay for their boldness. But, tell me, is Warwick friends with Margaret?

POST

Ay, gracious sovereign; they are so link'd infriendshipThat young Prince Edward marries Warwick's daughter.

POST

Yes, gracious lord, they are such close friends that the young Prince Edward will marry Warwick's daughter. 

CLARENCE

Belike the elder; Clarence will have the younger. Now, brother king, farewell, and sit you fast, For I will hence to Warwick's other daughter; That, though I want a kingdom, yet in marriage I may not prove inferior to yourself. You that love me and Warwick, follow me.

CLARENCE

[To himself] Probably the older daughter. I will have the younger one. 

[To KING EDWARD]

Now, I say goodbye, my kingly brother. And hold on to your throne because I will go to Warwick's other daughter. Even though I don't have a kingdom, I may not out to be less important than you, at least based on who we both marry. Whoever supports me and Warwick, come with me. 

Exit CLARENCE, and SOMERSET follows

GLOUCESTER

[Aside] Not I:My thoughts aim at a further matter; IStay not for the love of Edward, but the crown.

GLOUCESTER

[To himself] I won't be going with you. My thoughts are focused on something else entirely. I don't stay here for because I love Edward but because I want the crown. 

KING EDWARD IV

Clarence and Somerset both gone to Warwick! Yet am I arm'd against the worst can happen; And haste is needful in this desperate case. Pembroke and Stafford, you in our behalf Go levy men, and make prepare for war; They are already, or quickly will be landed: Myself in person will straight follow you.

KING EDWARD IV

Clarence and Somerset have both gone to Warwick! But I am prepared for the worst that can happen and moving quickly is necessary in this extreme situation. Pembroke and Stafford, go and gather men in my name, and prepare for war. They have already landed or they will be landing soon. I will follow you straight away myself.

Exeunt PEMBROKE and STAFFORD

KING EDWARD IV

But, ere I go, Hastings and Montague, Resolve my doubt. You twain, of all the rest, Are near to Warwick by blood and by alliance: Tell me if you love Warwick more than me? If it be so, then both depart to him; I rather wish you foes than hollow friends: But if you mind to hold your true obedience, Give me assurance with some friendly vow, That I may never have you in suspect.

KING EDWARD IV

But, before I go, Hastings and Montague, clear up something for me. Of all of them, you two are closest to Warwick by blood and friendship. Tell me, do you love Warwick more than you love me? If that's the case, then you can both leave to go to him. I would rather have you as enemies than insincere friends. But if you want to be truly obedient to me, give me your word with a friendly promise so that I never need to suspect you of treachery. 

MONTAGUE

So God help Montague as he proves true!

MONTAGUE

God help me while I prove my loyalty! 

HASTINGS

And Hastings as he favours Edward's cause!

HASTINGS

And God help me while I fight for Edward! 

KING EDWARD IV

Now, brother Richard, will you stand by us?

KING EDWARD IV

Richard, my brother, will you stand with me?

GLOUCESTER

Ay, in despite of all that shall withstand you.

GLOUCESTER

Yes, I'll stand with you against your enemies

KING EDWARD IV

Why, so! Then am I sure of victory.Now therefore let us hence; and lose no hour,Till we meet Warwick with his foreign power.

KING EDWARD IV

Well, there you go! Then I am sure I'll win. Now let us go from here and let's not lose time until we find Warwick with his foreign army.

Exeunt

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Nina romancikova
About the Translator: Nina Romancikova

Nina Romancikova is from Slovakia but her love of literature and theater has brought her to the UK and she has been living and studying there for the past six years. She graduated with a degree in English Literature and Language at University of Glasgow in 2016. Nina is now finishing her Masters in Shakespeare Studies at King's College London and is currently working as a Research Intern at Shakespeare's Globe.