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Henry VI, Part 3

Henry VI, Part 3 Translation Act 4, Scene 6

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Flourish. Enter KING HENRY VI, CLARENCE, WARWICK, SOMERSET, HENRY OF RICHMOND, OXFORD, MONTAGUE, and Lieutenant of the Tower

KING HENRY VI

Master lieutenant, now that God and friendsHave shaken Edward from the regal seat,And turn'd my captive state to liberty,My fear to hope, my sorrows unto joys,At our enlargement what are thy due fees?

KING HENRY VI

Officer, now that God and my friends have removed Edward from the throne and set me free, turning my fear to hope and sorrow into joy, what money do I owe you for the food received in prison?

LIEUTENANT

Subjects may challenge nothing of their sovereigns;But if an humble prayer may prevail,I then crave pardon of your majesty.

LIEUTENANT

Subjects can't require any payment from their kings. But if you'll hear my simple prayer, then I'll ask forgiveness from your majesty. 

KING HENRY VI

For what, lieutenant? For well using me? Nay, be thou sure I'll well requite thy kindness, For that it made my imprisonment a pleasure; Ay, such a pleasure as incaged birds Conceive when after many moody thoughts At last by notes of household harmony They quite forget their loss of liberty. But, Warwick, after God, thou set'st me free, And chiefly therefore I thank God and thee; He was the author, thou the instrument. Therefore, that I may conquer fortune's spite By living low, where fortune cannot hurt me, And that the people of this blessed land May not be punish'd with my thwarting stars, Warwick, although my head still wear the crown, I here resign my government to thee, For thou art fortunate in all thy deeds.

KING HENRY VI

Forgiveness for what, lieutenant? For treating me well? No, you can be sure that I'll repay your kindness, because you made my imprisonment almost a pleasure. Yes, the kind of pleasure that caged birds begin to experience after many melancholy thoughts when, at last, by filling the house with song, they completely forget that they are not free. But, Warwick, besides God, you were my chief rescuer so I particularly thank God and you. He was the creator and you carried out his will. I want to avoid fate's hatred of me by living humbly so fortune cannot hurt me, and I want to ensure that the people of this blessed country won't get punished for my bad luck along with me. Therefore, Warwick, although I will still wear the crown, I turn over the running of the government to you because you are lucky in everything you do. 

WARWICK

Your grace hath still been famed for virtuous; And now may seem as wise as virtuous, By spying and avoiding fortune's malice, For few men rightly temper with the stars: Yet in this one thing let me blame your grace, For choosing me when Clarence is in place.

WARWICK

Your grace is renowned for being virtuous and now may be as clever as he is virtuous, by foreseeing and avoiding the hate of fortune. You're clever because only a few men don't try to fight their fate. But let me correct your grace in this one thing: don't choose me when you have Clarence ready to rule. 

CLARENCE

No, Warwick, thou art worthy of the sway,To whom the heavens in thy nativityAdjudged an olive branch and laurel crown,As likely to be blest in peace and war;And therefore I yield thee my free consent.

CLARENCE

No, Warwick. You are worthy of the power. At your birth, the stars aligned to symbolize an olive branch, a symbol of peace, and a laurel crown, a symbol of victory, which meant you would blessed in peace and war alike. That's why I grant you my willing consent for you to rule. 

WARWICK

And I choose Clarence only for protector.

WARWICK

I think only Clarence should serve as Lord Protector in place of the king if the king will not rule. 

KING HENRY VI

Warwick and Clarence give me both your hands: Now join your hands, and with your hands your hearts, That no dissension hinder government: I make you both protectors of this land, While I myself will lead a private life And in devotion spend my latter days, To sin's rebuke and my Creator's praise.

KING HENRY VI

Warwick and Clarence, both of you give me your hands. Now join your hands together, and join your hearts together with them so that no disagreement may stand in the way of your governing. I make you both protectors of this country, while I will lead a private life myself and spend my last days in prayers, condemning sin and praising God. 

WARWICK

What answers Clarence to his sovereign's will?

WARWICK

What does Clarence say to his king's wishes?

CLARENCE

That he consents, if Warwick yield consent;For on thy fortune I repose myself.

CLARENCE

That he agrees, if Warwick agrees too, because I rely on your decisions. 

WARWICK

Why, then, though loath, yet must I be content: We'll yoke together, like a double shadow To Henry's body, and supply his place; I mean, in bearing weight of government, While he enjoys the honour and his ease. And, Clarence, now then it is more than needful Forthwith that Edward be pronounced a traitor, And all his lands and goods be confiscate.

WARWICK

Well, although I am reluctant, I must be happy with it. We'll join together, like a double shadow of Henry's body and fill his place. I mean fill his place in carrying the weight of the government while he enjoys living honorably and at ease. And, Clarence, now it is even more necessary that Edward quickly should be declared a traitor and all his lands and possessions should be confiscated. 

CLARENCE

What else? And that succession be determined.

CLARENCE

Obviously! And the order of succession must be determined. 

WARWICK

Ay, therein Clarence shall not want his part.

WARWICK

Yes, you'll have be high up on that list, Clarence. 

KING HENRY VI

But, with the first of all your chief affairs, Let me entreat, for I command no more, That Margaret your queen and my son Edward Be sent for, to return from France with speed; For, till I see them here, by doubtful fear My joy of liberty is half eclipsed.

KING HENRY VI

For the first of your great tasks, since I have nothing else to command, let me ask that that you send for Queen Margaret and my son Edward to return quickly from France.Until I see them here, my joy at being free won't be complete because of my fears and doubts. 

CLARENCE

It shall be done, my sovereign, with all speed.

CLARENCE

It will be done as swiftly as possible, my king. 

KING HENRY VI

My Lord of Somerset, what youth is that,Of whom you seem to have so tender care?

KING HENRY VI

My Lord Somerset, who is that young man that you seem to care for so much?

SOMERSET

My liege, it is young Henry, earl of Richmond.

SOMERSET

My lord, this is young Henry, earl of Richmond. 

KING HENRY VI

Come hither, England's hope.

KING HENRY VI

Come forward, hope of England's future. 

Lays his hand on his head

If secret powers Suggest but truth to my divining thoughts, This pretty lad will prove our country's bliss. His looks are full of peaceful majesty, His head by nature framed to wear a crown, His hand to wield a sceptre, and himself Likely in time to bless a regal throne. Make much of him, my lords, for this is he Must help you more than you are hurt by me.

If some secret powers bring any truth to my prophetic thoughts, this handsome boy will be our country's salvation. His looks are full of peace and majesty, his head is shaped by nature to wear a crown, his hand to hold a scepter and he himself is likely to sit in the throne soon enough. Be good to him, my lords, because you'll eventually get more help from him than you've had suffering because of me. 

Enter a Post

WARWICK

What news, my friend?

WARWICK

What news do you bring, my friend?

POST

That Edward is escaped from your brother,And fled, as he hears since, to Burgundy.

MESSENGER

Edward escaped from your brother and ran away to Burgundy, it has been said. 

WARWICK

Unsavoury news! But how made he escape?

WARWICK

Distasteful news! But how did he escape?

POST

He was convey'd by Richard Duke of Gloucester And the Lord Hastings, who attended him In secret ambush on the forest side And from the bishop's huntsmen rescued him; For hunting was his daily exercise.

MESSENGER

He was stolen away secretly by Richard, Duke of Gloucester and the Lord Hastings, who waited for him in hiding on the edge of the forest. They rescued him from the archbishop's huntsmen. Edward had been hunting daily. 

WARWICK

My brother was too careless of his charge.But let us hence, my sovereign, to provideA salve for any sore that may betide.

WARWICK

My brother the archbishop was too careless with his prisoner. But let us go from here, my king, to provide healing to any injury that may occur. 

Exeunt all but SOMERSET, HENRY OF RICHMOND, and OXFORD

SOMERSET

My lord, I like not of this flight of Edward's; For doubtless Burgundy will yield him help, And we shall have more wars before 't be long. As Henry's late presaging prophecy Did glad my heart with hope of this young Richmond, So doth my heart misgive me, in these conflicts What may befall him, to his harm and ours: Therefore, Lord Oxford, to prevent the worst, Forthwith we'll send him hence to Brittany, Till storms be past of civil enmity.

SOMERSET

My lord, I don't like Edward's escaping because Burgundy will definitely offer him help, and we shall have more wars before too long. Just as Henry's recent forward-looking prophecy warmed my heart with hope of this young Richmond, so too is my heart worried about what may happen to Richmond in these battles that could hurt both him and ourselves. Therefore, Lord Oxford, to stop the worst from hasting, we'll quickly send him over to Brittany until this civil war is over. 

OXFORD

Ay, for if Edward repossess the crown,'Tis like that Richmond with the rest shall down.

OXFORD

Yes, because if Edwards gets the crown back, Richmond and everyone else will fall. 

SOMERSET

It shall be so; he shall to Brittany.Come, therefore, let's about it speedily.

SOMERSET

It shall be so, he will go to Brittany. Come, then, let's deal with it quickly. 

Exeunt

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Nina romancikova
About the Translator: Nina Romancikova

Nina Romancikova is from Slovakia but her love of literature and theater has brought her to the UK and she has been living and studying there for the past six years. She graduated with a degree in English Literature and Language at University of Glasgow in 2016. Nina is now finishing her Masters in Shakespeare Studies at King's College London and is currently working as a Research Intern at Shakespeare's Globe.