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Henry VIII

Henry VIII Translation Act 1, Scene 1

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Enter NORFOLK at one door; at the other, BUCKINGHAM and ABERGAVENNY

BUCKINGHAM

Good morrow, and well met. How have ye doneSince last we saw in France?

BUCKINGHAM

Good morning, and good to see you. How have you been since we last met in France?

NORFOLK

I thank your grace,Healthful; and ever since a fresh admirerOf what I saw there.

NORFOLK

Thank you, sir, I've been well. And ever since I've been thinking admiringly about what I saw there.

BUCKINGHAM

An untimely ague Stay'd me a prisoner in my chamber when Those suns of glory, those two lights of men, Met in the vale of Andren.

BUCKINGHAM

An unfortunate sickness kept me prisoner in my room when those two men as glorious and bright as suns met in the valley of Andren.

NORFOLK

'Twixt Guynes and Arde: I was then present, saw them salute on horseback; Beheld them, when they lighted, how they clung In their embracement, as they grew together; Which had they, what four throned ones could have weigh'd Such a compounded one?

NORFOLK

Between Guynes and Arde. I was there and saw them greet each other on horseback. I saw them when they got off the horses. They held on to each other so hard when they hugged that it looked like they were two plants growing together. If they had, those two together would have been worth more than four kings.

BUCKINGHAM

All the whole timeI was my chamber's prisoner.

BUCKINGHAM

The whole time I was stuck in my room like a prisoner.

NORFOLK

Then you lost The view of earthly glory: men might say, Till this time pomp was single, but now married To one above itself. Each following day Became the next day's master, till the last Made former wonders its. To-day the French, All clinquant, all in gold, like heathen gods, Shone down the English; and, to-morrow, they Made Britain India: every man that stood Show'd like a mine. Their dwarfish pages were As cherubins, all guilt: the madams too, Not used to toil, did almost sweat to bear The pride upon them, that their very labour Was to them as a painting: now this masque Was cried incomparable; and the ensuing night Made it a fool and beggar. The two kings, Equal in lustre, were now best, now worst, As presence did present them; him in eye, Still him in praise: and, being present both 'Twas said they saw but one; and no discerner Durst wag his tongue in censure. When these suns— For so they phrase 'em—by their heralds challenged The noble spirits to arms, they did perform Beyond thought's compass; that former fabulous story, Being now seen possible enough, got credit, That Bevis was believed.

NORFOLK

Then you lost your chance to see glory on earth. It's as if all glory has been single in the past, but now it's married to glory greater than itself. Every day was better than the one before until the last one was full of all the wonders seen before. One day the French, all clanking, all dressed in gold like heathen gods, shone brighter than the English. The next day, the British were dressed so richly that they made Britain seem like India. Every man standing up looked like a mine because they were covered in gold. Their short pages looked like gold-covered cherubs. The ladies, too, not used to work, almost sweated to carry the beautiful things they wore, and their effort was like makeup: it made them look better. One day this display was said to be incomparable, but the next night it was made to look like the display of a fool and a beggar. Of the two kings, equal in brightness, one seemed better, then worse, at any moment. One looked better at one time, but the other one was praised more. When they were both present, people said they only saw one. No onlooker dared criticize anything. When these suns, as they were called, had their announcers challenge the noblemen to fight, those nobles did better than you can imagine. The old legend of Bevis now seemed possible and was believed.

BUCKINGHAM

O, you go far.

BUCKINGHAM

Oh, you're praising them highly.

NORFOLK

As I belong to worship and affect In honour honesty, the tract of every thing Would by a good discourser lose some life, Which action's self was tongue to. All was royal; To the disposing of it nought rebell'd. Order gave each thing view; the office did Distinctly his full function.

NORFOLK

I swear by my reputation and love for honesty, the description of everything that was done there couldn't do justice to it even if it were described by a good talker. Things went perfectly. Everything was done in good order, and the people in charge did their job well.

BUCKINGHAM

Who did guide,I mean, who set the body and the limbsOf this great sport together, as you guess?

BUCKINGHAM

Who was in charge? I mean, who was the one to organize this sport, like a mind in charge of the parts of a body?

NORFOLK

One, certes, that promises no elementIn such a business.

NORFOLK

Someone you wouldn't expect to have any part in such business.

BUCKINGHAM

I pray you, who, my lord?

BUCKINGHAM

Tell me, who, my lord?

NORFOLK

All this was order'd by the good discretionOf the right reverend Cardinal of York.

NORFOLK

This was organized wisely by the honorable Cardinal of York.

BUCKINGHAM

The devil speed him! no man's pie is freed From his ambitious finger. What had he To do in these fierce vanities? I wonder That such a keech can with his very bulk Take up the rays o' the beneficial sun And keep it from the earth.

BUCKINGHAM

May the devil take good care of him! He's got his ambitious finger in everyone's pie. What did he have to do with this foolish fighting? I'm surprised that such a lump of fat can block the rays of the kind sun with his bulk and keep them from the earth.

NORFOLK

Surely, sir, There's in him stuff that puts him to these ends; For, being not propp'd by ancestry, whose grace Chalks successors their way, nor call'd upon For high feats done to the crown; neither allied For eminent assistants; but, spider-like, Out of his self-drawing web, he gives us note, The force of his own merit makes his way A gift that heaven gives for him, which buys A place next to the king.

NORFOLK

Surely, sir, there's something in him that makes him want these things. He doesn't have the help of being from a good family, which guarantees succession to power, and he isn't being rewarded for brave deeds done for the king. Nor does he have powerful allies. But, like a spider, spinning his own web for himself, he makes us notice him. He clears a path for himself with his own worth. It's a gift to him from God, which buys him a place next to the king.

ABERGAVENNY

I cannot tell What heaven hath given him,—let some graver eye Pierce into that; but I can see his pride Peep through each part of him: whence has he that, If not from hell? the devil is a niggard, Or has given all before, and he begins A new hell in himself.

ABERGAVENNY

I can't tell what God has given him. Let some wiser man look into that. But I can see his pride showing in every part of him. Where did he get that, if not from hell? The devil doesn't like to give anything away, or he's already given away everything, so the Cardinal begins a new hell inside himself.

BUCKINGHAM

Why the devil, Upon this French going out, took he upon him, Without the privity o' the king, to appoint Who should attend on him? He makes up the file Of all the gentry; for the most part such To whom as great a charge as little honour He meant to lay upon: and his own letter, The honourable board of council out, Must fetch him in the papers.

BUCKINGHAM

Why the devil, when this French expedition took place, did he take it upon himself to decide who would go with the king without asking him? He made up the list of all the nobles. Mostly it was those he meant to get a lot of money out of without giving them credit for it. He sends for the money by writing a letter, without consulting the king's honorable councilors.

ABERGAVENNY

I do know Kinsmen of mine, three at the least, that have By this so sickened their estates, that never They shall abound as formerly.

ABERGAVENNY

I know relatives of mine, at least three, who because of this are in so much financial trouble that they'll never get their finances back to where they were before.

BUCKINGHAM

O, many Have broke their backs with laying manors on 'em For this great journey. What did this vanity But minister communication of A most poor issue?

BUCKINGHAM

Oh, many people have broken their backs paying for mansions for the court to stay in on this great journey. What did this foolish man do, except help this bad thing happen?

NORFOLK

Grievingly I think,The peace between the French and us not valuesThe cost that did conclude it.

NORFOLK

Sadly, I think the peace between the French and us isn't worth the money that was paid to make it.

BUCKINGHAM

Every man, After the hideous storm that follow'd, was A thing inspired; and, not consulting, broke Into a general prophecy; That this tempest, Dashing the garment of this peace, aboded The sudden breach on't.

BUCKINGHAM

Every man, after the horrible storm that followed the peace-making, was a prophet. Without thinking, they broke into a prophecy about general things: that this storm, dashing against the clothes of the people making this peace, meant that it would be broken soon.

NORFOLK

Which is budded out;For France hath flaw'd the league, and hath attach'dOur merchants' goods at Bourdeaux.

NORFOLK

And the peace has been broken. Because France has broken the treaty and has seized our merchants' goods at Bordeaux.

ABERGAVENNY

Is it thereforeThe ambassador is silenced?

ABERGAVENNY

Is that why the ambassador has been silenced?

NORFOLK

Marry, is't.

NORFOLK

Yes, it is.

ABERGAVENNY

A proper title of a peace; and purchasedAt a superfluous rate!

ABERGAVENNY

So we have just a title deed for a peace, and bought at too high a price!

BUCKINGHAM

Why, all this businessOur reverend cardinal carried.

BUCKINGHAM

The respected cardinal carried out all this business.

NORFOLK

Like it your grace, The state takes notice of the private difference Betwixt you and the cardinal. I advise you— And take it from a heart that wishes towards you Honour and plenteous safety—that you read The cardinal's malice and his potency Together; to consider further that What his high hatred would effect wants not A minister in his power. You know his nature, That he's revengeful, and I know his sword Hath a sharp edge: it's long and, 't may be said, It reaches far, and where 'twill not extend, Thither he darts it. Bosom up my counsel, You'll find it wholesome. Lo, where comes that rock That I advise your shunning.

NORFOLK

Your grace, the government notices the private quarrel between you and the cardinal. I advise you—this comes from a heart that wishes you honor and safety—to consider both the cardinal's ill-will and his power. Consider furthermore that he has all the minions he needs to do what he wants out of his powerful hatred. You know his vengeful nature and I know his sword has a sharp edge. It's long and they say it reaches far and, where it doesn't reach, he throws it. Remember my advice. You'll find that it's good. See, the rock I advise you to avoid is coming now.

Enter CARDINAL WOLSEY, the purse borne before him, certain of the Guard, and two Secretaries with papers. CARDINAL WOLSEY in his passage fixeth his eye on BUCKINGHAM, and BUCKINGHAM on him, both full of disdain

CARDINAL WOLSEY

The Duke of Buckingham's surveyor, ha?Where's his examination?

CARDINAL WOLSEY

The Duke of Buckingham's surveyor! Where's his paperwork?

FIRST SECRETARY

Here, so please you.

FIRST SECRETARY

Here, sir.

CARDINAL WOLSEY

Is he in person ready?

CARDINAL WOLSEY

Is he ready to appear in person?

FIRST SECRETARY

Ay, please your grace.

FIRST SECRETARY

Yes, your grace.

CARDINAL WOLSEY

Well, we shall then know more; and BuckinghamShall lessen this big look.

CARDINAL WOLSEY

Well, I'll find out more. Buckingham won't look this confident soon.

Exeunt CARDINAL WOLSEY and his Train

BUCKINGHAM

This butcher's cur is venom-mouth'd, and I Have not the power to muzzle him; therefore best Not wake him in his slumber. A beggar's book Outworths a noble's blood.

BUCKINGHAM

This dog of a butcher's son has a poisonous bite, and I can't muzzle him. So it's better not to wake him when he's sleeping. A beggar's pocket book is worth more than the blood of a nobleman.

NORFOLK

What, are you chafed?Ask God for temperance; that's the appliance onlyWhich your disease requires.

NORFOLK

Are you angry? Ask God to make you patient. That's what you need to be cured of this disease of anger.

BUCKINGHAM

I read in's looks Matter against me; and his eye reviled Me, as his abject object: at this instant He bores me with some trick: he's gone to the king; I'll follow and outstare him.

BUCKINGHAM

I saw from how he looked at me that he has a grudge against me. His eye seemed to be disgusted by me, thinking I was a worthless thing to look at. Right now he's plotting against me. He's gone to the king. I'll follow and glare at him.

NORFOLK

Stay, my lord, And let your reason with your choler question What 'tis you go about: to climb steep hills Requires slow pace at first: anger is like A full-hot horse, who being allow'd his way, Self-mettle tires him. Not a man in England Can advise me like you: be to yourself As you would to your friend.

NORFOLK

Wait, my lord, and think about what you're doing. You have to go slowly at first when climbing steep hills. Anger is like a horse eager to run. Allowed to do what he wants, he tires himself out. Not a single man in England can give me as good advice as you can. Act the same way toward yourself as you would to a friend, and give yourself good advice.

BUCKINGHAM

I'll to the king; And from a mouth of honour quite cry down This Ipswich fellow's insolence; or proclaim There's difference in no persons.

BUCKINGHAM

I'll go to the king. I'll use my honorable position to insult this arrogant man from Ipswich. If I don't succeed, it shows that people of different classes are equal.

NORFOLK

Be advised; Heat not a furnace for your foe so hot That it do singe yourself: we may outrun, By violent swiftness, that which we run at, And lose by over-running. Know you not, The fire that mounts the liquor til run o'er, In seeming to augment it wastes it? Be advised: I say again, there is no English soul More stronger to direct you than yourself, If with the sap of reason you would quench, Or but allay, the fire of passion.

NORFOLK

Think about this. Don't hurt yourself by plotting against your enemy. By running too quickly towards what you run toward, you can miss it and lose. Don't you know that a fire that makes a pot boil over seems to increase its volume but actually wastes it? Think about this. Again, there is no English man who could give you better advice than you could give yourself, if you would just be reasonable and stop being angry, or at least be less angry.

BUCKINGHAM

Sir, I am thankful to you; and I'll go along By your prescription: but this top-proud fellow, Whom from the flow of gall I name not but From sincere motions, by intelligence, And proofs as clear as founts in July when We see each grain of gravel, I do know To be corrupt and treasonous.

BUCKINGHAM

Sir, I'm thankful to you, and I'll do what you say. But I know this arrogant man, whom I despise not because of hot-headed anger but for good reason, to be corrupt and a traitor. I know this from secret sources, with proof as clear as streams in July, when you can see every stone at the bottom.

NORFOLK

Say not 'treasonous.'

NORFOLK

Don't say "a traitor."

BUCKINGHAM

To the king I'll say't; and make my vouch as strong As shore of rock. Attend. This holy fox, Or wolf, or both,— for he is equal ravenous As he is subtle, and as prone to mischief As able to perform't; his mind and place Infecting one another, yea, reciprocally— Only to show his pomp as well in France As here at home, suggests the king our master To this last costly treaty, the interview, That swallow'd so much treasure, and like a glass Did break i' the rinsing.

BUCKINGHAM

I'll say it to the king. And I'll swear it with a promise as strong as a rock. Listen. This holy man is like a fox, or a wolf, or both: he is as greedy as he is sly and he's as willing to do evil as he is able to do it. His mind and his social position infect each other. He suggested this expensive alliance to the king only so he could show off as much in France as he does here at home. The meeting swallowed so much money, and like a glass it broke as it was being made.

NORFOLK

Faith, and so it did.

NORFOLK

That's true, it did.

BUCKINGHAM

Pray, give me favour, sir. This cunning cardinal The articles o' the combination drew As himself pleased; and they were ratified As he cried 'Thus let be': to as much end As give a crutch to the dead: but our count-cardinal Has done this, and 'tis well; for worthy Wolsey, Who cannot err, he did it. Now this follows,— Which, as I take it, is a kind of puppy To the old dam, treason,—Charles the emperor, Under pretence to see the queen his aunt— For 'twas indeed his colour, but he came To whisper Wolsey,—here makes visitation: His fears were, that the interview betwixt England and France might, through their amity, Breed him some prejudice; for from this league Peep'd harms that menaced him: he privily Deals with our cardinal; and, as I trow,— Which I do well; for I am sure the emperor Paid ere he promised; whereby his suit was granted Ere it was ask'd; but when the way was made, And paved with gold, the emperor thus desired, That he would please to alter the king's course, And break the foresaid peace. Let the king know, As soon he shall by me, that thus the cardinal Does buy and sell his honour as he pleases, And for his own advantage.

BUCKINGHAM

Listen, sir. This sly cardinal drew up the treaty as he pleased. It was signed when he said "Let it be this way." It's as useful as giving a crutch to a dead person. But our ruler the cardinal did it anyway, and that's good. Because honest Wolsey, who never makes mistakes, did it. Then this happened (which looks a lot like treason, as much as a dog looks like its mother). Charles the emperor, claiming he wanted to see the queen his aunt (that was his story, but he came to whisper to Wolsey) visited. He was afraid that the meeting between England and France might do him harm if they became allies. He talked privately to our cardinal. I think (and it's something I do well) that the emperor paid before he agreed to anything. And then his request was granted before he asked. But anyway, when the path had been cleared with bribes, the emperor asked the cardinal to change the king's actions and break this alliance. The king should know, and I'll tell him, that the cardinal buys and sells his honor whenever he wants, for his own advantage.

NORFOLK

I am sorryTo hear this of him; and could wish he wereSomething mistaken in't.

NORFOLK

I am sorry to hear this about him, and I hope there's a mistake in what you say about him.

BUCKINGHAM

No, not a syllable:I do pronounce him in that very shapeHe shall appear in proof.

BUCKINGHAM

No, not at all. I describe him exactly as he is, and I'll prove it.

Enter BRANDON, a Sergeant-at-arms before him, and two or three of the Guard

BRANDON

Your office, sergeant; execute it.

BRANDON

Do your job, sergeant.

SERGEANT

Sir, My lord the Duke of Buckingham, and Earl Of Hereford, Stafford, and Northampton, I Arrest thee of high treason, in the name Of our most sovereign king.

SERGEANT

My lord the Duke of Buckingham, Earl of Hereford, Stafford, and Northampton, sir, I arrest you for high treason in the name of our king.

BUCKINGHAM

Lo, you, my lord,The net has fall'n upon me! I shall perishUnder device and practise.

BUCKINGHAM

See, my lord, I've been caught in his trap! I'll die from his plots.

BRANDON

I am sorry To see you ta'en from liberty, to look on The business present: 'tis his highness' pleasure You shall to the Tower.

BRANDON

I'm sorry to see you captured and to see this happen. The king wants you to go to the Tower.

BUCKINGHAM

It will help me nothing To plead mine innocence; for that dye is on me Which makes my whitest part black. The will of heaven Be done in this and all things! I obey. O my Lord Abergavenny, fare you well!

BUCKINGHAM

It won't help me to say I'm innocent. Even the most innocent part of me will be made to seem guilty. May God's will be done in this and all things! I obey. Oh, lord Abergavenny, goodbye!

BRANDON

Nay, he must bear you company. [To ABERGAVENNY] The king is pleased you shall to the Tower, till you knowHow he determines further.

BRANDON

No, he must go with you. 

[To ABERGAVENNY] The king wants you to go the Tower until he decides what will happen to you.

ABERGAVENNY

As the duke said,The will of heaven be done, and the king's pleasureBy me obey'd!

ABERGAVENNY

As the duke said, may God's will be done and may I do what the king wants!

BRANDON

Here is a warrant from The king to attach Lord Montacute; and the bodies Of the duke's confessor, John de la Car, One Gilbert Perk, his chancellor—

BRANDON

Here is a warrant from the king to arrest Lord Montacute, the duke's confessor, John de la Car, and a certain Gilbert Perk, his chancellor— 

BUCKINGHAM

So, so;These are the limbs o' the plot: no more, I hope.

BUCKINGHAM

All right. That's the end of his plot. I hope no more people will be arrested.

BRANDON

A monk o' the Chartreux.

BRANDON

A Chartreux monk.

BUCKINGHAM

O, Nicholas Hopkins?

BUCKINGHAM

Oh no, Nicholas Hopkins?

BRANDON

He.

BRANDON

That's him.

BUCKINGHAM

My surveyor is false; the o'er-great cardinal Hath show'd him gold; my life is spann'd already: I am the shadow of poor Buckingham, Whose figure even this instant cloud puts on, By darkening my clear sun. My lord, farewell.

BUCKINGHAM

My surveyor is a liar. The overly-powerful cardinal gave him gold. My life is already over. I am the shadow of poor Buckingham, and even now clouds cover me and darken the bright sun of my life. Goodbye, my lord.

Exeunt

Henry viii
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