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Julius Caesar

Julius Caesar Translation Act 3, Scene 2

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BRUTUS and CASSIUS enter with a crowd of PLEBEIANS.

PLEBEIANS

We will be satisfied! Let us be satisfied!

PLEBEIANS

We demand answers! Give us answers!

BRUTUS

Then follow me and give me audience, friends. —Cassius, go you into the other street And part the numbers. —Those that will hear me speak, let 'em stay here. Those that will follow Cassius, go with him, And public reasons shall be renderèd Of Caesar’s death.

BRUTUS

Then follow me and listen to what I say, friends. 

[To CASSIUS] Cassius, go on to the next street. Split up the crowd. 

[To PLEBEIANS] Let those who want to hear me speak stay here. Those who want to hear from Cassius, go with him. We’ll explain the reasons behind Caesar’s death publicly.

FIRST PLEBEIAN

I will hear Brutus speak.

FIRST PLEBEIAN

I’ll listen to Brutus.

ANOTHER PLEBEIAN

I will hear Cassius and compare their reasonsWhen severally we hear them renderèd.

ANOTHER PLEBEIAN

I’ll listen to Cassius, and later we'll compare what they've said.

CASSIUS exits with some of the PLEBEIANS. BRUTUS gets up on the platform.

THIRD PLEBEIAN

The noble Brutus is ascended. Silence!

THIRD PLEBEIAN

Noble Brutus has walked up to the platform. Quiet!

BRUTUS

Be patient till the last. Romans, countrymen, and lovers! Hear me for my cause, and be silent that you mayhear. Believe me for mine honor, and have respect to mine honor that you may believe. Censure me in your wisdom, and awake your senses that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friendof Caesar’s, to him I say that Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his. If then that friend demand why Brutus rose against Caesar, this is my answer: not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more. Had yourather Caesar were living and die all slaves, than thatCaesar were dead, to live all free men? As Caesar lovedme, I weep for him. As he was fortunate, I rejoice at it. As he was valiant, I honor him. But, as he was ambitious, I slew him. There is tears for his love, joy for his fortune, honor for his valor, and death for his ambition. Who is here so base that would be a bondman? If any, speak—for him have I offended. Who is here so rude that would not be a Roman? If any, speak—for him have I offended. Who is here so vile that will not love his country? If any, speak—for him have I offended. I pause for a reply.

BRUTUS

Please be calm until I finish. Romans, countrymen, and friends! Listen to the reasons for my actions, and be silent so you can hear. Do me the honor of believing me, and know that, upon my honor, you can believe me. Be wise in your judgment of me, and keep your minds alert so that you can judge me wisely. If there’s anyone in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar’s, I say to him that my love for Caesar was no less than his. If, then, that friend demands to know why I rose up against Caesar, this is my answer: it’s not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more. Would you prefer that Caesar were living, and we would all one day die as slaves? Or would you prefer that Caesar were dead and we all lived as free men? Because Caesar was my friend, I weep for him. Because he had so much good fortune, I am so happy for him. Because he was brave, I honor him. But because he was ambitious, I killed him. There are tears for his love, joy for his fortune, honor for his bravery, and death for his ambition. Who standing here is so wretched that he wants to be a slave? If there are any, let them speak—because they are the ones that I have offended. Who here is so uncivilized that he does not want to be a Roman? If there are any, let them speak—because they are the ones that I have offended. Who here is so despicable that he does not love his country? If there are any, let them speak—because they are the ones that I have offended. I will wait for a reply.

ALL

None, Brutus, none.

ALL

No one, Brutus, no one.

BRUTUS

Then none have I offended. I have done no more to Caesar than you shall do to Brutus. The question of his death is enrolled in the Capitol. His glory not extenuated wherein he was worthy, nor his offenses enforced for which he suffered death.

BRUTUS

Then I have offended no one. I’ve done no more to Caesar than you would do to me. The reasons for his death are on record in the Capitol. His glory has not been reduced where he earned it, nor have the offenses for which he was killed been exaggerated.

ANTONY enters with CAESAR’s body.

BRUTUS

Here comes his body, mourned by Mark Antony, who, though he had no hand in his death, shall receive the benefit of his dying—a place in the commonwealth—as which of you shall not? With this I depart: that, as I slew my best lover for the good of Rome, I have the samedagger for myself when it shall please my country to need my death.

BRUTUS

Here comes his body, mourned by Mark Antony, who, though he had no part in killing Caesar, will benefit from his death—full citizenship in the commonwealth. And which of you won't benefit from that? I will depart with these final words: just as I killed my best friend for the good of Rome, I will still keep the same dagger, so that I can kill myself when my country requires my death.

ALL

Live, Brutus! Live, live!

ALL

Live, Brutus! Live, live!

FIRST PLEBEIAN

Bring him with triumph home unto his house!

FIRST PLEBEIAN

Let’s carry him in triumph to his house!

SECOND PLEBEIAN

Give him a statue with his ancestors!

SECOND PLEBEIAN

Let’s build a statue of him, near those of his ancestors!

THIRD PLEBEIAN

Let him be Caesar!

THIRD PLEBEIAN

Let him become Caesar!

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

Caesar’s better partsShall be crowned in Brutus!

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

We will crown Brutus, who has all of Caesar’s better qualities.

FIRST PLEBEIAN

We’ll bring him to his house with shouts and clamors.

FIRST PLEBEIAN

We’ll carry him to his house with shouts and celebration!

BRUTUS

My countrymen—

BRUTUS

My countrymen—

SECOND PLEBEIAN

Peace, silence! Brutus speaks.

SECOND PLEBEIAN

Quiet! Silence! Brutus speaks.

FIRST PLEBEIAN

Peace, ho!

FIRST PLEBEIAN

Hey, quiet!

BRUTUS

Good countrymen, let me depart alone. And, for my sake, stay here with Antony. Do grace to Caesar’s corpse, and grace his speech Tending to Caesar’s glories, which Mark Antony By our permission is allowed to make. I do entreat you, not a man depart, Save I alone, till Antony have spoke.

BRUTUS

Good countrymen, let me leave on my own. And, for my sake, stay here with Antony. Give honor to Caesar’s corpse, as well as to Antony’s speech about Caesar’s glories—which we have given him our permission to make. I beg that none of you leave until Antony has spoken, except for me.

BRUTUS exits.

FIRST PLEBEIAN

Stay, ho! And let us hear Mark Antony.

FIRST PLEBEIAN

We'll stay! Let us listen to Mark Antony.

THIRD PLEBEIAN

Let him go up into the public chair. We’ll hear him. —Noble Antony, go up.

THIRD PLEBEIAN

Let him walk up to the platform. We’ll listen to him. 

[To ANTONY] Noble Antony, mount the platform.

ANTONY

For Brutus' sake, I am beholding to you. [ascends the pulpit]

ANTONY

For Brutus’ sake, I am indebted to you.
[He steps up onto the platform]

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

What does he say of Brutus?

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

What does he say about Brutus?

THIRD PLEBEIAN

He says for Brutus' sakeHe finds himself beholding to us all.

THIRD PLEBEIAN

He says that for Brutus’ sake he finds himself indebted to us all.

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

'Twere best he speak no harm of Brutus here.

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

He’d better not say anything bad about Brutus here.

FIRST PLEBEIAN

This Caesar was a tyrant.

FIRST PLEBEIAN

Caesar was a tyrant.

THIRD PLEBEIAN

Nay, that’s certain.We are blest that Rome is rid of him.

THIRD PLEBEIAN

That’s for sure. We’re lucky that Rome is rid of him.

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

Peace! Let us hear what Antony can say.

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

Quiet! Let’s hear what Antony has to say.

ANTONY

You gentle Romans—

ANTONY

You noble Romans—

ALL

Peace, ho! Let us hear him.

ALL

Hey, quiet! Let us hear him.

ANTONY

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears. I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interrèd with their bones. So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus Hath told you Caesar was ambitious. If it were so, it was a grievous fault, And grievously hath Caesar answered it. Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest— For Brutus is an honorable man; So are they all, all honorable men— Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral. He was my friend, faithful and just to me. But Brutus says he was ambitious, And Brutus is an honorable man. He hath brought many captives home to Rome Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill. Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept. Ambition should be made of sterner stuff. Yet Brutus says he was ambitious, And Brutus is an honorable man. You all did see that on the Lupercal I thrice presented him a kingly crown, Which he did thrice refuse. Was this ambition? Yet Brutus says he was ambitious, And, sure, he is an honorable man. I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke, But here I am to speak what I do know. You all did love him once, not without cause. What cause withholds you then to mourn for him? O judgment! Thou art fled to brutish beasts, And men have lost their reason. Bear with me. My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar, And I must pause till it come back to me. [weeps]

ANTONY

Friends, Romans, countrymen: give me a moment of your attention. I’ve come here to bury Caesar, not to praise him. The evil that men do is remembered after they die, but the good is often buried with their bones. May it be that way with Caesar. The noble Brutus told you that Caesar was ambitious. If that’s true, it’s a terrible fault—and Caesar has paid terribly for it. Now, with the permission of Brutus and the others—because Brutus is an honorable man, as all the others are honorable men—I have come to speak at Caesar’s funeral. He was my friend. He was loyal and fair to me. But Brutus says he was ambitious, and Brutus is an honorable man. He brought many captives home to Rome whose filled the public treasury. Did Caesar seem ambitious when he did this? When the poor cried, Caesar cried. Ambition shouldn’t be so tender-hearted. Yet Brutus says he was ambitious, and Brutus is an honorable man. You all saw that on the feast day of Lupercal, I offered Caesar a king’s crown three times. And all three times he refused it. Was that ambition? Yet Brutus says he was ambitious. And, of course, Brutus is an honorable man. I do not say this to disprove what Brutus has said, but to speak about what I know. You all loved Caesar once, and not without reason. So what reason stops you from mourning him? Oh, gods! You have become brutish beasts, and men have lost their reason! Apologies for that outburst. My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar, and I must pause until it returns to me. [He weeps]

FIRST PLEBEIAN

Methinks there is much reason in his sayings.

FIRST PLEBEIAN

I think that a lot of what he's saying makes sense.

SECOND PLEBEIAN

If thou consider rightly of the matter,Caesar has had great wrong.

SECOND PLEBEIAN

If you think about it the right way, Caesar has been badly wronged.

THIRD PLEBEIAN

Has he, masters?I fear there will a worse come in his place.

THIRD PLEBEIAN

Has he, good sirs? I worry that someone worse than Caesar will come to replace him.

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

Marked ye his words? He would not take the crown.Therefore ’tis certain he was not ambitious.

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

Did you listen to Antony's words? Caesar wouldn’t take the crown. Therefore it’s certain that he wasn’t ambitious.

FIRST PLEBEIAN

If it be found so, some will dear abide it.

FIRST PLEBEIAN

If it can be proven that he wasn't, certain people will pay dearly for all this.

SECOND PLEBEIAN

Poor soul! His eyes are red as fire with weeping.

SECOND PLEBEIAN

Poor man! Antony’s eyes are fiery red from weeping.

THIRD PLEBEIAN

There’s not a nobler man in Rome than Antony.

THIRD PLEBEIAN

There's not a nobler man than Antony in Rome.

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

Now mark him. He begins again to speak.

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

Now pay attention to him. He’s starting to speak again.

ANTONY

But yesterday the word of Caesar might Have stood against the world. Now lies he there, And none so poor to do him reverence. O masters, if I were disposed to stir Your hearts and minds to mutiny and rage, I should do Brutus wrong, and Cassius wrong— Who, you all know, are honorable men. I will not do them wrong. I rather choose To wrong the dead, to wrong myself and you, Than I will wrong such honorable men. But here’s a parchment with the seal of Caesar. I found it in his closet. 'Tis his will. Let but the commons hear this testament— Which, pardon me, I do not mean to read— And they would go and kiss dead Caesar’s wounds And dip their napkins in his sacred blood, Yea, beg a hair of him for memory, And, dying, mention it within their wills, Bequeathing it as a rich legacy Unto their issue.

ANTONY

Just yesterday, no one in the world would have stood against Caesar's commands. Now he lies there dead, and no one is so humble as to show him respect. Oh, sirs, if I were trying to stir your hearts and minds to rage and rebellion, I would be doing wrong to Brutus and Cassius—who, as you all know, are honorable men. I will not do them wrong. I choose rather to wrong the dead, and wrong myself and you, than wrong such honorable men. But here’s a paper with Caesar’s seal on it. I found it in his room. It’s his will. If the public were to know what was in this will—which, excuse me, I don’t plan on reading to you—they would go and kiss dead Caesar’s wounds, dip their handkerchiefs in his blessed blood, and even beg for a lock of his hair to remember him by. And when they died, they would include the handkerchief or the hair in their wills, passing it on to their own heirs as a treasured inheritance.

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

We’ll hear the will. Read it, Mark Antony!

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

We want to hear the will. Read it, Mark Antony!

ALL

The will, the will! We will hear Caesar’s will.

ALL

The will, the will! We want to hear Caesar’s will.

ANTONY

Have patience, gentle friends. I must not read it. It is not meet you know how Caesar loved you. You are not wood, you are not stones, but men. And, being men, bearing the will of Caesar, It will inflame you, it will make you mad. 'Tis good you know not that you are his heirs. For, if you should—Oh, what would come of it!

ANTONY

Have patience, noble friends. I must not read it. It's not right for you to know how much Caesar loved you. You're not wood, you're not stones. You’re men. And, being men, if you knew what was in Caesar’s will, it would anger you. It will drive you crazy. It’s better that you not know that you are his heirs. Because, if you did know—oh, what would happen!

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

Read the will. We’ll hear it, Antony.You shall read us the will, Caesar’s will.

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

Read the will. We want to hear it, Antony. You must read us the will, Caesar’s will.

ANTONY

Will you be patient? Will you stay awhile? I have o'ershot myself to tell you of it. I fear I wrong the honorable men Whose daggers have stabbed Caesar. I do fear it.

ANTONY

Will you be patient? Will you wait a while? I’ve said too much in telling you about it. I’m afraid that I wrong the honorable men whose daggers have stabbed Caesar. I really fear it.

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

They were traitors! “Honorable men”!

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

They were traitors, these so-called “honorable men!”

ALL

The will! The testament!

ALL

The will! The testament!

SECOND PLEBEIAN

They were villains, murderers. The will! Read the will!

SECOND PLEBEIAN

They were villains, murderers. The will! Read the will!

ANTONY

You will compel me, then, to read the will? Then make a ring about the corpse of Caesar, And let me show you him that made the will. Shall I descend? And will you give me leave?

ANTONY

So you'll force me to read the will? Then form a circle around Caesar’s corpse, and let me show you the man who made this will. Shall I come down? Will you allow me to?

ALL

Come down.

ALL

Come down.

SECOND PLEBEIAN

Descend.

SECOND PLEBEIAN

Come down.

THIRD PLEBEIAN

You shall have leave.

THIRD PLEBEIAN

We’ll allow you.

ANTONY comes down from the platform.

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

A ring!Stand round.

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

A circle! Form a circle!

FIRST PLEBEIAN

Stand from the hearse. Stand from the body.

FIRST PLEBEIAN

Stand back from the hearse. Stand back from the body.

SECOND PLEBEIAN

Room for Antony, most noble Antony!

SECOND PLEBEIAN

Make room for Antony, most noble Antony!

ANTONY

Nay, press not so upon me. Stand far off.

ANTONY

No, don’t press up against me. Stand further away.

ALL

Stand back. Room! Bear back.

ALL

Stand back. Give him room. Move back.

ANTONY

If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all do know this mantle. I remember The first time ever Caesar put it on. 'Twas on a summer’s evening in his tent, That day he overcame the Nervii. Look, in this place ran Cassius' dagger through. See what a rent the envious Casca made. Through this the well-belovèd Brutus stabbed. And as he plucked his cursèd steel away, Mark how the blood of Caesar followed it, As rushing out of doors, to be resolved If Brutus so unkindly knocked, or no. For Brutus, as you know, was Caesar’s angel. Judge, O you gods, how dearly Caesar loved him! This was the most unkindest cut of all. For when the noble Caesar saw him stab, Ingratitude, more strong than traitors' arms, Quite vanquished him. Then burst his mighty heart, And, in his mantle muffling up his face, Even at the base of Pompey’s statue, Which all the while ran blood, great Caesar fell. O, what a fall was there, my countrymen! Then I, and you, and all of us fell down, Whilst bloody treason flourished over us. Oh, now you weep, and, I perceive, you feel The dint of pity. These are gracious drops. Kind souls, what, weep you when you but behold Our Caesar’s vesture wounded? Look you here, Here is himself, marred, as you see, with traitors. [lifts up CAESAR's mantle]

ANTONY

If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all know this cloak. I remember the first time Caesar ever put it on. It was a summer evening in his tent, on the day he defeated the Nervii warriors. Look, this is the place where Cassius’s dagger cut through it. See the rip that the envious Casca made. The much beloved Brutus stabbed him through this hole. And when Brutus yanked out his cursed dagger, see how Caesar’s blood followed after it—as if rushing out a door to see for sure if it was Brutus knocking so rudely. For Brutus was Caesar’s angel, as you know. Oh gods, how dearly Caesar loved him! This was the cruelest cut of all. When the noble Caesar saw him stab, it was Brutus' ingratitude more than the traitors' weapons that overwhelmed him. Then his mighty heart burst. And with his face covered by his cloak—which was dripping with blood—great Caesar fell at the base of Pompey’s statue. Oh, what a fall it was, my countrymen! Then I, and you, all of us fell down, while bloody treason celebrated its victory over us. Oh, now you weep, and I see you feel the pain of pity. These tears are honorable. Good men, do you weep when all you're looking at is Caesar’s wounded cloak? Look right here, here is the man himself, battered by traitors, as you can see. [He lifts up CAESAR's cloak]

FIRST PLEBEIAN

O piteous spectacle!

FIRST PLEBEIAN

Oh, what a heartbreaking sight!

SECOND PLEBEIAN

O noble Caesar!

SECOND PLEBEIAN

Oh, noble Caesar!

THIRD PLEBEIAN

O woeful day!

THIRD PLEBEIAN

Oh, what a sad day!

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

O traitors, villains!

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

Oh, traitors, villains!

FIRST PLEBEIAN

O most bloody sight!

FIRST PLEBEIAN

Oh, most bloody sight!

SECOND PLEBEIAN

We will be revenged.

SECOND PLEBEIAN

We will get revenge.

ALL

Revenge! About! Seek! Burn! Fire! Kill! Slay!Let not a traitor live!

ALL

Revenge! Look around. Find them! Burn! Set fire! Kill! Slay! Leave no traitors alive!

ANTONY

Stay, countrymen.

ANTONY

Wait, countrymen.

FIRST PLEBEIAN

Peace there! Hear the noble Antony.

FIRST PLEBEIAN

Quiet there! Listen to the noble Antony.

SECOND PLEBEIAN

We’ll hear him. We’ll follow him. We’ll die with him.

SECOND PLEBEIAN

We’ll listen to him. We’ll follow him. We’ll die with him.

ANTONY

Good friends, sweet friends! Let me not stir you up To such a sudden flood of mutiny. They that have done this deed are honorable. What private griefs they have, alas, I know not, That made them do it. They are wise and honorable, And will, no doubt, with reasons answer you. I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts. I am no orator, as Brutus is, But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man That love my friend. And that they know full well That gave me public leave to speak of him. For I have neither wit nor words nor worth, Action nor utterance nor the power of speech, To stir men’s blood. I only speak right on. I tell you that which you yourselves do know, Show you sweet Caesar’s wounds, poor poor dumb mouths, And bid them speak for me. But were I Brutus, And Brutus Antony, there were an Antony Would ruffle up your spirits and put a tongue In every wound of Caesar that should move The stones of Rome to rise and mutiny.

ANTONY

Good friends, sweet friends: don’t let me stir you up to such a sudden surge of revolt. Those who have done this deed are honorable. I don’t know what personal grudges they had that made them do it. They are wise and honorable, and will give you reasons for their actions, without a doubt. I am not here to steal your loyalty, friends. I’m no orator like Brutus. As you all know, I'm just a plain, blunt man who loved his friend. And those who gave me permission to speak know this very well. I don't have the cleverness, vocabulary, reputation, body language, or eloquence to stir men to passion. I just say what I really think. I tell you what you already know. I show you sweet Caesar’s wounds—those poor, poor, speechless mouths—and ask them to speak for me. But if I were Brutus—and Brutus were me—then that would be an Antony who would fill your spirits with rage, and put in each of Caesar’s wounds a voice that would inspire even the stones in Rome to rise up and rebel.

ALL

We’ll mutiny.

ALL

We’ll revolt.

FIRST PLEBEIAN

We’ll burn the house of Brutus.

FIRST PLEBEIAN

We’ll burn Brutus’ house.

THIRD PLEBEIAN

Away, then! Come, seek the conspirators.

THIRD PLEBEIAN

Let’s go, then! Come, find the conspirators!

ANTONY

Yet hear me, countrymen. Yet hear me speak.

ANTONY

Wait, and listen to me, countrymen.

ALL

Peace, ho! Hear Antony. Most noble Antony!

ALL

Quiet! Wait! Listen to Antony. Most noble Antony!

ANTONY

Why, friends, you go to do you know not what. Wherein hath Caesar thus deserved your loves? Alas, you know not. I must tell you then. You have forgot the will I told you of.

ANTONY

Why, friends, you don’t know what you’re doing. What has Caesar done to deserve your love? Alas, you don’t know. I must tell you then. You’ve forgotten the will I told you about.

ALL

Most true. The will! Let’s stay and hear the will.

ALL

That's true. The will! Let’s stay and hear the will!

ANTONY

Here is the will, and under Caesar’s sealTo every Roman citizen he gives—To every several man—seventy-five drachmas.

ANTONY

Here’s the will, marked by Caesar’s seal. To every Roman citizen he gives—to every single man—seventy-five silver coins.

SECOND PLEBEIAN

Most noble Caesar! We’ll revenge his death.

SECOND PLEBEIAN

Most noble Caesar! We’ll revenge his death.

THIRD PLEBEIAN

O royal Caesar!

THIRD PLEBEIAN

Oh, royal Caesar!

ANTONY

Hear me with patience.

ANTONY

Listen to me with patience.

ALL

Peace, ho!

ALL

Quiet!

ANTONY

Moreover, he hath left you all his walks, His private arbors and new-planted orchards, On this side Tiber. He hath left them you And to your heirs forever—common pleasures, To walk abroad and recreate yourselves. Here was a Caesar! When comes such another?

ANTONY

In addition, he’s left you all of his walkways, his private gardens, and newly planted orchards, on this side of the Tiber River. He has left them to you and to your heirs forever—public parks where you can wander and relax. Here was a Caesar! When will there be another like him?

FIRST PLEBEIAN

Never, never.—Come, away, away!We’ll burn his body in the holy place,And with the brands fire the traitors' houses.Take up the body.

FIRST PLEBEIAN

Never, never. Come, let’s go, let's go! We’ll burn his body in the holy place, and use the torches to set fire to the traitors' houses. Lift up the body.

SECOND PLEBEIAN

Go fetch fire.

SECOND PLEBEIAN

Go get some fire.

THIRD PLEBEIAN

Pluck down benches.

THIRD PLEBEIAN

Go get some benches for wood.

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

Pluck down forms, windows, anything.

FOURTH PLEBEIAN

Rip down doors, windowsills, anything.

PLEBEIANS exit with CAESAR’s body.

ANTONY

Now let it work. Mischief, thou art afoot.Take thou what course thou wilt!

ANTONY

Now let it work. Mischief, you are on the loose. Follow whatever path you want!

OCTAVIUS' SERVANT enters.

ANTONY

How now, fellow?

ANTONY

What’s going on?

OCTAVIUS' SERVANT

Sir, Octavius is already come to Rome.

OCTAVIUS' SERVANT

Sir, Octavius has already arrived in Rome.

ANTONY

Where is he?

ANTONY

Where is he?

OCTAVIUS' SERVANT

He and Lepidus are at Caesar’s house.

OCTAVIUS' SERVANT

He and Lepidus are at Caesar’s house.

ANTONY

And thither will I straight to visit him. He comes upon a wish. Fortune is merry, And in this mood will give us anything.

ANTONY

I'll go straight there to visit him. He comes just when I hoped he would. Fortune is happy and will give us anything in this mood.

OCTAVIUS' SERVANT

I heard him say, Brutus and CassiusAre rid like madmen through the gates of Rome.

OCTAVIUS' SERVANT

I heard Octavius say that Brutus and Cassius rode their horses like madmen to escape through the gates of Rome.

ANTONY

Belike they had some notice of the peopleHow I had moved them. Bring me to Octavius.

ANTONY

They probably got some warning of how much I stirred up the people. Bring me to Octavius.

They exit.

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Ben florman
About the Translator: Ben Florman

Ben is a co-founder of LitCharts. He holds a BA in English Literature from Harvard University, where as an undergraduate he won the Winthrop Sargent prize for best undergraduate paper on a topic related to Shakespeare.