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King John

King John Translation Act 3, Scene 1

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Enter CONSTANCE, ARTHUR, and SALISBURY

CONSTANCE

Gone to be married! gone to swear a peace! False blood to false blood join'd! gone to be friends! Shall Lewis have Blanch, and Blanch those provinces? It is not so; thou hast misspoke, misheard: Be well advised, tell o'er thy tale again: It cannot be; thou dost but say 'tis so: I trust I may not trust thee; for thy word Is but the vain breath of a common man: Believe me, I do not believe thee, man; I have a king's oath to the contrary. Thou shalt be punish'd for thus frighting me, For I am sick and capable of fears, Oppress'd with wrongs and therefore full of fears, A widow, husbandless, subject to fears, A woman, naturally born to fears; And though thou now confess thou didst but jest, With my vex'd spirits I cannot take a truce, But they will quake and tremble all this day. What dost thou mean by shaking of thy head? Why dost thou look so sadly on my son? What means that hand upon that breast of thine? Why holds thine eye that lamentable rheum, Like a proud river peering o'er his bounds? Be these sad signs confirmers of thy words? Then speak again; not all thy former tale, But this one word, whether thy tale be true.

CONSTANCE

Gone to get married! Gone to make peace! Lying blood is joined to lying blood! Gone to be friends? Will Lewis have Blanch, and Blanch have those provinces? It isn't true. You misspoke or misheard. Be cautious, tell your story again. It can't be true, you're just saying it's true. I trust I can't trust you, because your word is just the empty sounds made by a common man. Believe me, I don't believe you, man. I have a king's oath to do the opposite of what you say. You will be punished for frightening me in this way, because I am sick and easy to scare and I'm a woman, naturally afraid. And even if you confess now that you were only joking, I can't calm my troubled mind, but it will tremble with fear all day. What do you mean by shaking your head? Why do you look so sadly at my son? What does that hand on your chest mean? Why is your eye crying so sadly, like a proud river swelling over its banks? Do these sad signs confirm your words? Then speak again. Don't tell the whole story again, but say this one word: whether your story is true. 

SALISBURY

As true as I believe you think them falseThat give you cause to prove my saying true.

SALISBURY

My story is as true as you think these people's promises were false.

CONSTANCE

O, if thou teach me to believe this sorrow, Teach thou this sorrow how to make me die, And let belief and life encounter so As doth the fury of two desperate men Which in the very meeting fall and die. Lewis marry Blanch! O boy, then where art thou? France friend with England, what becomes of me? Fellow, be gone: I cannot brook thy sight: This news hath made thee a most ugly man.

CONSTANCE

Oh, if you teach me to believe this sad thing, teach this sad thing how to kill me, and let belief and life fight like two furious, desperate men who fall and die at the moment they clash together. Lewis is marrying Blanch! Oh, boy, then where are you? Now that France is friends with England, what will happen to me? Man, go away. I can't stand the sight of you. This news has made you a very ugly man.

SALISBURY

What other harm have I, good lady, done,But spoke the harm that is by others done?

SALISBURY

What harm have I done, good lady, except that I told you the harm done by others?

CONSTANCE

Which harm within itself so heinous isAs it makes harmful all that speak of it.

CONSTANCE

That harm is so terrible in itself that it makes anyone who speaks of it harmful.

ARTHUR

I do beseech you, madam, be content.

ARTHUR

Please, ma'am, accept what's happened.

CONSTANCE

If thou, that bid'st me be content, wert grim, Ugly and slanderous to thy mother's womb, Full of unpleasing blots and sightless stains, Lame, foolish, crooked, swart, prodigious, Patch'd with foul moles and eye-offending marks, I would not care, I then would be content, For then I should not love thee , no, nor thou Become thy great birth nor deserve a crown. But thou art fair, and at thy birth, dear boy, Nature and Fortune join'd to make thee great: Of Nature's gifts thou mayst with lilies boast, And with the half-blown rose. But Fortune, O, She is corrupted, changed and won from thee; She adulterates hourly with thine uncle John, And with her golden hand hath pluck'd on France To tread down fair respect of sovereignty, And made his majesty the bawd to theirs. France is a bawd to Fortune and King John, That strumpet Fortune, that usurping John! Tell me, thou fellow, is not France forsworn? Envenom him with words, or get thee gone And leave those woes alone which I alone Am bound to under-bear.

CONSTANCE

[To ARTHUR] If you who ask me to accept this were grim, ugly, and an insult to your mother's womb, full of unpleasant blots and disgusting stains, lame, foolish, misshapen, dark, monstrous, covered in ugly moles and offensive-looking marks, I wouldn't care. Then I would accept this, because then I would not love you. No, and you wouldn't do credit to your great family or deserve the crown. But you are handsome, and at your birth, dear boy, Nature and Fortune joined together to make you great. You can compare favorably the gifts Nature gave you with lilies and half-opened roses. But Fortune, oh, she has been corrupted, changed, and stolen from you. She's committing adultery every hour with your uncle John, and with her golden hand has encouraged the king of France to walk all over the rightful king and made him their pimp. France is a pimp to Fortune and King John. Fortune is a prostitute and John is a thief! [To SALISBURY] Tell me, you fellow, hasn't the king of France broken his promise? Poison him with words, or go and leave me alone to bear the sorrows I'm the only one who has to bear.

SALISBURY

Pardon me, madam,I may not go without you to the kings.

SALISBURY

I'm sorry, ma'am, I can't go to the kings without you.

CONSTANCE

Thou mayst, thou shalt; I will not go with thee: I will instruct my sorrows to be proud; For grief is proud and makes his owner stoop. To me and to the state of my great grief Let kings assemble; for my grief's so great That no supporter but the huge firm earth Can hold it up: here I and sorrows sit;Here is my throne, bid kings come bow to it.

CONSTANCE

You can and you will. I will not go with you. I will turn my sorrow into pride. Sadness is proud and makes its owner bow to it. Let kings assemble around me and the authority of my great sadness, because my sadness is so great that no support except the huge firm earth can hold it up. Here sorrows and I sit. Here is my throne. Ask kings to come bow to it.

Seats herself on the ground

Enter KING JOHN, KING PHILLIP, LEWIS, BLANCH, QUEEN ELINOR, the BASTARD, AUSTRIA, and Attendants

KING PHILIP

'Tis true, fair daughter; and this blessed day Ever in France shall be kept festival: To solemnize this day the glorious sun Stays in his course and plays the alchemist, Turning with splendor of his precious eye The meagre cloddy earth to glittering gold: The yearly course that brings this day about Shall never see it but a holiday.

KING PHILIP

It's true, beautiful daughter, and this blessed day will always be celebrated as a festival in France. To celebrate this day the glorious sun stops in its track and acts like a scientist, turning the meager muddy earth into glittering gold with the brightness of his precious eye. When this day comes up every year it will always be treated as a holiday.

CONSTANCE

A wicked day, and not a holy day!

CONSTANCE

An evil day, not a holy day!

Rising

CONSTANCE

What hath this day deserved? what hath it done, That it in golden letters should be set Among the high tides in the calendar? Nay, rather turn this day out of the week, This day of shame, oppression, perjury. Or, if it must stand still, let wives with child Pray that their burthens may not fall this day, Lest that their hopes prodigiously be cross'd: But on this day let seamen fear no wreck; No bargains break that are not this day made: This day, all things begun come to ill end, Yea, faith itself to hollow falsehood change!

CONSTANCE

What has this day deserved? What has it done to be set in golden letters among the saint's days on the calendar? No, instead remove this day from the week, this day of shame, oppression, lies. Or, if it must remain, let pregnant wives pray not to give birth on this day, fearing that their hopes will end in disaster. May sailors not fear shipwreck except on this day. May no bargains be broken that are not made on this day. May everything begun on this day end badly, yes, may faith itself change into hollow lies!

KING PHILIP

By heaven, lady, you shall have no causeTo curse the fair proceedings of this day:Have I not pawn'd to you my majesty?

KING PHILIP

By heaven, lady, you will have no reason to curse the good things that have happened today. Haven't I sold my kingship to you?

CONSTANCE

You have beguiled me with a counterfeit Resembling majesty, which, being touch'd and tried, Proves valueless: you are forsworn, forsworn; You came in arms to spill mine enemies' blood, But now in arms you strengthen it with yours: The grappling vigour and rough frown of war Is cold in amity and painted peace, And our oppression hath made up this league. Arm, arm, you heavens, against these perjured kings! A widow cries; be husband to me, heavens! Let not the hours of this ungodly day Wear out the day in peace; but, ere sunset, Set armed discord 'twixt these perjured kings! Hear me, O, hear me!

CONSTANCE

You tricked me with a fake that looked like kingship, which, being touched and tested, proved to be worthless. You broke your oath, broke your oath. You came armed to spill my enemies' blood, but now you strengthen it by giving someone of your blood into their arms. The fighting strength and rough frown of war can do nothing in friendship and gaudy peace, and this alliance was made by oppressing us. To arms, heaven, to fight these lying kings! A widow cries out: be a husband to me, heaven! Don't let the hours of this unholy day use up the day peacefully. But, before sunset, make these lying kings fight again! Hear me, oh hear me!

AUSTRIA

Lady Constance, peace!

AUSTRIA

Calm down, Lady Constance!

CONSTANCE

War! war! no peace! peace is to me a war O Lymoges! O Austria! thou dost shame That bloody spoil: thou slave, thou wretch, thou coward! Thou little valiant, great in villany! Thou ever strong upon the stronger side! Thou Fortune's champion that dost never fight But when her humorous ladyship is by To teach thee safety! thou art perjured too, And soothest up greatness. What a fool art thou, A ramping fool, to brag and stamp and swear Upon my party! Thou cold-blooded slave, Hast thou not spoke like thunder on my side, Been sworn my soldier, bidding me depend Upon thy stars, thy fortune and thy strength, And dost thou now fall over to my fores? Thou wear a lion's hide! doff it for shame, And hang a calf's-skin on those recreant limbs.

CONSTANCE

War! War! No peace. Peace is a war to me. Oh Lymoges! Oh Austria! You shame that bloody lion skin! You slave, you weakling, you coward! You're not very brave, but very evil! You're always acting strong on the stronger side! You're Fortune's fighter, and never fight except when you can be sure that unpredictable lady is near to guide you to safety! You're a liar too, and you flatter great men. What a fool you are, a roaring fool, to brag and stamp and swear on my side! You cold-blooded slave, haven't you spoken like thunder on my behalf and sworn to be my soldier, telling me to rely on your luck, your fortune, and your strength? And now you fall over in front of me? You wear a lion's skin! Take it off, be ashamed of yourself, and hang a calf's skin on those cowardly limbs.

AUSTRIA

O, that a man should speak those words to me!

AUSTRIA

Oh, I wish a man had spoken those words to me—!

BASTARD

And hang a calf's-skin on those recreant limbs.

BASTARD

And hang a calf's skin on those cowardly limbs.

AUSTRIA

Thou darest not say so, villain, for thy life.

AUSTRIA

You don't dare say so, you good-for-nothing—you'd be dead.

BASTARD

And hang a calf's-skin on those recreant limbs.

BASTARD

And hang a calf's skin on those cowardly limbs.

KING JOHN

We like not this; thou dost forget thyself.

KING JOHN

I don't like this. Behave yourself.

Enter CARDINAL PANDULPH

KING PHILIP

Here comes the holy legate of the pope.

KING PHILIP

Here comes the pope's holy deputy.

CARDINAL PANDULPH

Hail, you anointed deputies of heaven! To thee, King John, my holy errand is. I Pandulph, of fair Milan cardinal, And from Pope Innocent the legate here, Do in his name religiously demand Why thou against the church, our holy mother, So wilfully dost spurn; and force perforce Keep Stephen Langton, chosen archbishop Of Canterbury, from that holy see? This, in our foresaid holy father's name, Pope Innocent, I do demand of thee.

CARDINAL PANDULPH

Greetings, you holy deputies of God! I have a holy message for you, King John. I, Pandulph, cardinal of beautiful Milan, and deputy of Pope Innocent, in his name religiously ask why you're stubbornly disobeying the church, our holy mother. Why are you using force to stop Stephen Langton, our chosen archbishop of Canterbury, from taking up his holy office? I ask you this in the name our holy father, Pope Innocent.

KING JOHN

What earthy name to interrogatories Can task the free breath of a sacred king? Thou canst not, cardinal, devise a name So slight, unworthy and ridiculous, To charge me to an answer, as the pope. Tell him this tale; and from the mouth of England Add thus much more, that no Italian priest Shall tithe or toll in our dominions; But as we, under heaven, are supreme head, So under Him that great supremacy, Where we do reign, we will alone uphold, Without the assistance of a mortal hand: So tell the pope, all reverence set apart To him and his usurp'd authority.

KING JOHN

What earthly authorities can question a holy king's freedom? Cardinal, you can't think of a name more unimportant, worthless, and ridiculous to tell me to do anything as the Pope's. Tell him this. And tell him this much more from the king of England's mouth: that no Italian priest will tax my country. But since I, under God, am the highest leader, I will rule my great country for God without help from any mortal. Tell the pope that as respectfully as he and his stolen authority deserve.

KING PHILIP

Brother of England, you blaspheme in this.

KING PHILIP

Brother, you're speaking sinfully.

KING JOHN

Though you and all the kings of Christendom Are led so grossly by this meddling priest, Dreading the curse that money may buy out; And by the merit of vile gold, dross, dust, Purchase corrupted pardon of a man, Who in that sale sells pardon from himself, Though you and all the rest so grossly led This juggling witchcraft with revenue cherish, Yet I alone, alone do me oppose Against the pope and count his friends my foes.

KING JOHN

Although you and all the Christian kings are ordered around by this meddling priest, paying him money because you're afraid of being cursed; and since with disgusting gold, scum, and dust, you buy corrupted forgiveness from a man who will not be forgiven by God for selling it; and although you and the rest are ordered around and love and pay for this deceitful witchcraft—I alone, alone, oppose the pope and consider his friends my enemies.

CARDINAL PANDULPH

Then, by the lawful power that I have, Thou shalt stand cursed and excommunicate. And blessed shall he be that doth revolt From his allegiance to an heretic; And meritorious shall that hand be call'd, Canonized and worshipped as a saint, That takes away by any secret course Thy hateful life.

CARDINAL PANDULPH

Then by the lawful power I have, you will be cursed and excommunicated. And anyone who rebels against you—since you're a heretic—will be blessed. And the hand that assassinates you and takes your hateful life away will be called worthy, and will be made a saint and worshiped.

CONSTANCE

O, lawful let it be That I have room with Rome to curse awhile! Good father cardinal, cry thou amen To my keen curses; for without my wrong There is no tongue hath power to curse him right.

CONSTANCE

Oh, let it be lawful for me to curse along with Rome for a while! Good father cardinal, say amen to my sharp curses. Because without including a reference to the wrong he did me, no tongue has power to curse him properly.

CARDINAL PANDULPH

There's law and warrant, lady, for my curse.

CARDINAL PANDULPH

Lady, there's law and reason behind my curse.

CONSTANCE

And for mine too: when law can do no right, Let it be lawful that law bar no wrong: Law cannot give my child his kingdom here, For he that holds his kingdom holds the law; Therefore, since law itself is perfect wrong, How can the law forbid my tongue to curse?

CONSTANCE

And mine too. When law can't do right, let it be legal to do wrong. Law can't give my child his kingdom, because whoever has the kingdom is in charge of the law. So, since the law itself is completely wrong, how can the law keep me from cursing?

CARDINAL PANDULPH

Philip of France, on peril of a curse, Let go the hand of that arch-heretic; And raise the power of France upon his head, Unless he do submit himself to Rome.

CARDINAL PANDULPH

Philip of France, you will be cursed if you don't let go of the hand of that terrible heretic and attack him with all the power of France, unless he submits to Rome.

QUEEN ELINOR

Look'st thou pale, France? do not let go thy hand.

QUEEN ELINOR

Do you look scared, France? Don't let go.

CONSTANCE

Look to that, devil; lest that France repent,And by disjoining hands, hell lose a soul.

CONSTANCE

Take care that he doesn't, devil. If France repents and lets go, hell will lose a soul.

AUSTRIA

King Philip, listen to the cardinal.

AUSTRIA

King Philip, listen to the cardinal.

BASTARD

And hang a calf's-skin on his recreant limbs.

BASTARD

And hang a calf's skin on those cowardly limbs.

AUSTRIA

Well, ruffian, I must pocket up these wrongs, Because—

AUSTRIA

Well, you criminal, I have to pocket these insults because—

BASTARD

Your breeches best may carry them.

BASTARD

Your pants can carry them best.

KING JOHN

Philip, what say'st thou to the cardinal?

KING JOHN

Philip, what do you say to the cardinal?

CONSTANCE

What should he say, but as the cardinal?

CONSTANCE

What should he say except to agree with the cardinal?

LEWIS

Bethink you, father; for the difference Is purchase of a heavy curse from Rome, Or the light loss of England for a friend: Forego the easier.

LEWIS

Consider, father. The options are to suffer a painful curse from Rome or the small loss of England as a friend. Give up what's easiest.

BLANCH

That's the curse of Rome.

BLANCH

That's the curse of Rome.

CONSTANCE

O Lewis, stand fast! the devil tempts thee hereIn likeness of a new untrimmed bride.

CONSTANCE

Oh Lewis, be strong! The devil tempts you here in the shape of a wild new bride.

BLANCH

The Lady Constance speaks not from her faith,But from her need.

BLANCH

The Lady Constance isn't speaking according to what she believes, but what she needs.

CONSTANCE

O, if thou grant my need, Which only lives but by the death of faith, That need must needs infer this principle, That faith would live again by death of need. O then, tread down my need, and faith mounts up; Keep my need up, and faith is trodden down!

CONSTANCE

Oh, if you grant that I have needs only because you betrayed and broke faith with me, you have to agree that faith would be alive again if my needs died. So tread my needs down and faith rises up again. Keep my needs up, and faith is trampled down!

KING JOHN

The king is moved, and answers not to this.

KING JOHN

The king is moved by something and doesn't answer.

CONSTANCE

O, be removed from him, and answer well!

CONSTANCE

Oh, ignore him and give a good answer! 

AUSTRIA

Do so, King Philip; hang no more in doubt.

AUSTRIA

Do, King Philip. Don't hang on any longer to make a decision.

BASTARD

Hang nothing but a calf's-skin, most sweet lout.

BASTARD

Don't hang anything on except a calf's skin, you sweet idiot.

KING PHILIP

I am perplex'd, and know not what to say.

KING PHILIP

I'm troubled and don't know what to say.

CARDINAL PANDULPH

What canst thou say but will perplex thee more,If thou stand excommunicate and cursed?

CARDINAL PANDULPH

What can you say that will trouble you more than if you're excommunicated and cursed?

KING PHILIP

Good reverend father, make my person yours, And tell me how you would bestow yourself. This royal hand and mine are newly knit, And the conjunction of our inward souls Married in league, coupled and linked together With all religious strength of sacred vows; The latest breath that gave the sound of words Was deep-sworn faith, peace, amity, true love Between our kingdoms and our royal selves, And even before this truce, but new before, No longer than we well could wash our hands To clap this royal bargain up of peace, Heaven knows, they were besmear'd and over-stain'd With slaughter's pencil, where revenge did paint The fearful difference of incensed kings: And shall these hands, so lately purged of blood, So newly join'd in love, so strong in both, Unyoke this seizure and this kind regreet? Play fast and loose with faith? so jest with heaven, Make such unconstant children of ourselves, As now again to snatch our palm from palm, Unswear faith sworn, and on the marriage-bed Of smiling peace to march a bloody host, And make a riot on the gentle brow Of true sincerity? O, holy sir, My reverend father, let it not be so! Out of your grace, devise, ordain, impose Some gentle order; and then we shall be blest To do your pleasure and continue friends.

KING PHILIP

Good wise father, imagine you were me and tell me what you would do. This king and I have just been joined in an alliance, and we are deeply tied to each other by a marriage, coupled and linked together with the religious strength of holy vows. The last words we said were to promise strong faith, peace, friendship, and true love between our kingdoms and our royal selves. Before this truce—right before, not much longer before than the time it took us to wash our hands to shake on this royal peace deal—heaven knows, our hands were smeared and stained with murder's paintbrush, where revenge painted the terrible fights of angry kings. And will these hands, so recently washed clean of blood, so recently joined in love, and so strong in both respects, betray this handshake and this kind reconciliation? Play fast and loose with faith?Joke with heaven and make myself an unpredictable child, as I would if I snatched my palm from his? Should I take back a promise of faithfulness and on the marriage-bed of smiling peace march a bloody army, and start a riot on the gentle forehead of true honesty? Oh, holy sir, my respected father, don't let that happen! Kindly think of, command, and give me a gentler order, and then I will feel blessed to do what you wish and continue to be friends.

CARDINAL PANDULPH

All form is formless, order orderless, Save what is opposite to England's love. Therefore to arms! be champion of our church, Or let the church, our mother, breathe her curse, A mother's curse, on her revolting son. France, thou mayst hold a serpent by the tongue, A chafed lion by the mortal paw, A fasting tiger safer by the tooth, Than keep in peace that hand which thou dost hold.

CARDINAL PANDULPH

There's no custom that's a custom, no order that is orderly, except what is used to oppose England. So to arms! Fight for our church or let the church our mother speak her curse, a mother's curse against her revolting son. France, it would be safer for you to hold a snake by its tongue, an angry lion by its deadly paw, a starving tiger by its tooth, than to keep peace with the hand you hold.

KING PHILIP

I may disjoin my hand, but not my faith.

KING PHILIP

I can break the handshake, but not my promise. 

CARDINAL PANDULPH

So makest thou faith an enemy to faith; And like a civil war set'st oath to oath, Thy tongue against thy tongue. O, let thy vow First made to heaven, first be to heaven perform'd, That is, to be the champion of our church! What since thou sworest is sworn against thyself And may not be performed by thyself, For that which thou hast sworn to do amiss Is not amiss when it is truly done, And being not done, where doing tends to ill, The truth is then most done not doing it: The better act of purposes mistook Is to mistake again; though indirect, Yet indirection thereby grows direct, And falsehood falsehood cures, as fire cools fire Within the scorched veins of one new-burn'd. It is religion that doth make vows kept; But thou hast sworn against religion, By what thou swear'st against the thing thou swear'st, And makest an oath the surety for thy truth Against an oath: the truth thou art unsure To swear, swears only not to be forsworn; Else what a mockery should it be to swear! But thou dost swear only to be forsworn; And most forsworn, to keep what thou dost swear. Therefore thy later vows against thy first Is in thyself rebellion to thyself; And better conquest never canst thou make Than arm thy constant and thy nobler parts Against these giddy loose suggestions: Upon which better part our prayers come in, If thou vouchsafe them. But if not, then know The peril of our curses light on thee So heavy as thou shalt not shake them off, But in despair die under their black weight.

CARDINAL PANDULPH

So you make faithfulness an enemy to religious faith, and like a civil war you oppose promise to promise, your own words to your own words. Oh, you should keep the promise you first made to heaven, which is to fight for our church! What you promised since then was promised against yourself and you can't do it, because a promise to do something wrong is not wrong when you do what's right. When it isn't done, when doing it would be evil, you're being most honest by not doing it. The better act when you made a mistake by promising something is to make another mistake. Although that's wrong, you're making right out of wrong, and lying cures lying, like fire cools fire in the scorched veins of someone recently burned. It is religion that makes you keep your promises. But you've promised to act against religion, by using what you swear by against the thing you swear by, and making an oath act against an oath. The truth you are unsure about swearing only swears not to break a promise; otherwise it's pointless to make a promise! But you make a promise only to break a promise and you break the most promises by sticking to what you promised. So your later promises against your first are you revolting against yourself. And you can never have a better triumph than to defend your trustworthy and nobler parts against these foolish and sinful suggestions. Our prayers will support this better part, your soul, if you allow them to. But if not, then you should know that our dangerous curses will fall on you so heavily you can't shake them off, and you'll die in despair under their black weight.

AUSTRIA

Rebellion, flat rebellion!

AUSTRIA

Rebellion, complete rebellion!

BASTARD

Will't not be?Will not a calfs-skin stop that mouth of thine?

BASTARD

What? Won't a calf's skin shut that mouth of yours?

LEWIS

Father, to arms!

LEWIS

Father, take up your weapons! 

BLANCH

Upon thy wedding-day? Against the blood that thou hast married? What, shall our feast be kept with slaughter'd men? Shall braying trumpets and loud churlish drums, Clamours of hell, be measures to our pomp? O husband, hear me! ay, alack, how new Is husband in my mouth! even for that name, Which till this time my tongue did ne'er pronounce, Upon my knee I beg, go not to arms Against mine uncle.

BLANCH

On your wedding day? Against the family you married into? What, will murdered men attend our feast? Will loud trumpets and rude drums, noises from hell, play the music for our ceremony? Husband, listen to me! How new "husband" is in my mouth! By that name, which I have never said until now, I beg on my knee, don't go to war against my uncle.

CONSTANCE

O, upon my knee,Made hard with kneeling, I do pray to thee,Thou virtuous Dauphin, alter not the doomForethought by heaven!

CONSTANCE

Oh, on my knee, made hard with kneeling, I pray to you, you virtuous Dauphin, don't try to stop the punishment planned by heaven!

BLANCH

Now shall I see thy love: what motive mayBe stronger with thee than the name of wife?

BLANCH

Now I will test your love. What motive can be stronger for you than the name "wife?"

CONSTANCE

That which upholdeth him that thee upholds,His honour: O, thine honour, Lewis, thine honour!

CONSTANCE

He depends on his honor, just like you depend on him. Oh, your honor, Lewis, your honor!

LEWIS

I muse your majesty doth seem so cold,When such profound respects do pull you on.

LEWIS

I'm surprised you seem so uncertain, your majesty, when such great authority orders you on.

CARDINAL PANDULPH

I will denounce a curse upon his head.

CARDINAL PANDULPH

I will curse him.

KING PHILIP

Thou shalt not need. England, I will fall from thee.

KING PHILIP

You won't need to. England, I will betray you.

CONSTANCE

O fair return of banish'd majesty!

CONSTANCE

Oh what a beautiful return of kingliness!

QUEEN ELINOR

O foul revolt of French inconstancy!

QUEEN ELINOR

Oh what a disgusting rebellion of French trustworthiness!

KING JOHN

France, thou shalt rue this hour within this hour.

KING JOHN

France, you will regret this choice within an hour.

BASTARD

Old Time the clock-setter, that bald sexton Time,Is it as he will? well then, France shall rue.

BASTARD

Old Time the clock-winder, that bald officer time, is everything going as he wishes? Well then, France will regret this.

BLANCH

The sun's o'ercast with blood: fair day, adieu! Which is the side that I must go withal? I am with both: each army hath a hand; And in their rage, I having hold of both, They swirl asunder and dismember me. Husband, I cannot pray that thou mayst win; Uncle, I needs must pray that thou mayst lose; Father, I may not wish the fortune thine; Grandam, I will not wish thy fortunes thrive: Whoever wins, on that side shall I lose Assured loss before the match be play'd.

BLANCH

The sun is overcast with blood. Beautiful day, goodbye! Which side should I go with? I am with both. Each army has one of my hands. In their rage, with me holding on to both, they swirl apart and dismember me. Husband, I can't pray that you'll win. Uncle, I have to pray you'll lose. Father, I can't wish you to be fortunate. Grandmother, I won't wish you good fortune. Whoever wins, I'll lose on that side. I'm sure to lose before the match begins.

LEWIS

Lady, with me, with me thy fortune lies.

LEWIS

Lady, your fortune is with me now.

BLANCH

There where my fortune lives, there my life dies.

BLANCH

That's where my fortune lives and where my life dies.

KING JOHN

Cousin, go draw our puissance together.

KING JOHN

Cousin, go raise our army.

Exit BASTARD

KING JOHN

France, I am burn'd up with inflaming wrath; A rage whose heat hath this condition, That nothing can allay, nothing but blood, The blood, and dearest-valued blood, of France.

KING JOHN

France, I'm burning up with anger. My rage burns so hot that nothing can put it out, nothing but blood—the blood, and the most valued blood, of France.

KING PHILIP

Thy rage sham burn thee up, and thou shalt turnTo ashes, ere our blood shall quench that fire:Look to thyself, thou art in jeopardy.

KING PHILIP

Your rage will burn you up, and you will turn to ashes, before our blood puts out that fire. Watch out for yourself, you're in danger.

KING JOHN

No more than he that threats. To arms let's hie!

KING JOHN

No more than the man making that threat. Let's go, to arms!

Exeunt

King john
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