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Macbeth

Macbeth Translation Act 1, Scene 6

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Torches light the stage. The sound of oboes playing. DUNCAN enters, along with MALCOLM, DONALBAIN, BANQUO, LENNOX, MACDUFF, ROSS, ANGUS, and their attendants.

DUNCAN

This castle hath a pleasant seat. The airNimbly and sweetly recommends itselfUnto our gentle senses.

DUNCAN

This castle sits in a pleasant place. The fresh, sweet air delights my noble senses.

BANQUO

This guest of summer, The temple-haunting martlet, does approve, By his loved mansionry, that the heaven’s breath Smells wooingly here. No jutty, frieze, Buttress, nor coign of vantage, but this bird Hath made his pendant bed and procreant cradle. Where they most breed and haunt, I have observed, The air is delicate.

BANQUO

That the martin—a summer bird that builds its nest in the steeples of churches—builds its nest here proves how sweet and blessed the breeze is. These birds have built nests on every projection, carving, buttress, and corner of this castle. I've noticed that martins prefer to live and mate in places where the air is most fine.

LADY MACBETH enters.

DUNCAN

See, see, our honored hostess! The love that follows us sometime is our trouble, Which still we thank as love. Herein I teach you How you shall bid God ‘ild us for your pains, And thank us for your trouble.

DUNCAN

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LADY MACBETH

All our service, In every point twice done and then done double, Were poor and single business to contend Against those honors deep and broad wherewith Your majesty loads our house. For those of old, And the late dignities heaped up to them, We rest your hermits.

LADY MACBETH

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DUNCAN

Where’s the thane of Cawdor? We coursed him at the heels and had a purpose To be his purveyor; but he rides well, And his great love, sharp as his spur, hath holp him To his home before us. Fair and noble hostess, We are your guest tonight.

DUNCAN

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LADY MACBETH

Your servants ever Have theirs, themselves, and what is theirs in compt , To make their audit at your highness’ pleasure, Still to return your own.

LADY MACBETH

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DUNCAN

Give me your hand. Conduct me to mine host. We love him highly And shall continue our graces towards him. By your leave, hostess.

DUNCAN

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They all exit.

Macbeth
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Ben florman
About the Translator: Ben Florman

Ben is a co-founder of LitCharts. He holds a BA in English Literature from Harvard University, where as an undergraduate he won the Winthrop Sargent prize for best undergraduate paper on a topic related to Shakespeare.