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Othello

Othello Translation Act 3, Scene 1

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Enter CASSIO and MUSICIANS

CASSIO

Masters, play here, I will content your pains.Something that’s brief, and bid “Good morrow, general.”

CASSIO

Gentlemen, play some music here. I'll pay you for your trouble. Play a short song, and then say, "Good morning, general."

They play. Enter CLOWN

CLOWN

Why masters, have your instruments been in Naples, thatthey speak i' th' nose thus?

CLOWN

Gentlemen, have your instruments been in Naples? Is that why they have that strange nasal sound?

MUSICIAN

How, sir? How?

MUSICIAN

What do you mean, sir?

CLOWN

Are these, I pray you, wind instruments?

CLOWN

Tell me, are these wind instruments?

MUSICIAN

Ay, marry, are they, sir.

MUSICIAN

Yes, indeed they are, sir.

CLOWN

Oh, thereby hangs a tail.

CLOWN

Well, that's an problem.

MUSICIAN

Whereby hangs a tale, sir?

MUSICIAN

What's the problem, sir?

CLOWN

Marry sir, by many a wind instrument that I know. But,masters, here’s money for you, and the general so likesyour music that he desires you, for love’s sake, to make no more noise with it.

CLOWN

Indeed, sir, windbags!  They're the problem. But, gentlemen, here's some money for you. The general likes your music so much that he would like you to stop playing it, for God's sake.

MUSICIAN

Well, sir, we will not.

MUSICIAN

Well then, sir, we will stop.

CLOWN

If you have any music that may not be heard, to ’t again. But, as they say, to hear music the general does not greatly care.

CLOWN

If you have any songs that are silent, feel free to keep playing those. But, you know, the general doesn't care much for music.

MUSICIAN

We have none such, sir.

MUSICIAN

We don't have any silent songs, sir.

CLOWN

Then put up your pipes in your bag, for I’ll away. Go, vanish into air, away!

CLOWN

Then pack up your instruments and go. Vanish into the air. Go!

Exeunt MUSICIANS

CASSIO

Dost thou hear, my honest friend?

CASSIO

Do you hear, my honest friend?

CLOWN

No, I hear not your honest friend, I hear you.

CLOWN

No, I don't hear your honest friend. I hear you.

CASSIO

Prithee, keep up thy quillets. There’s a poor piece of gold for thee. If the gentlewoman that attends the general’s wife be stirring, tell her there’s one Cassio entreats her a little favour of speech. Wilt thou do this?

CASSIO

Please, that's enough of your jokes. Here's a little gold for you.  If the woman who takes care of the general's wife is awake, tell her that a man named Cassio begs the she give him a chance to speak with her. Will you do this?

CLOWN

She is stirring, sir. If she will stir hither, I shall seem to notify unto her.

CLOWN

She is awake, sir. If she happens to come this way, I'll tell her.

Exit CLOWN

Enter IAGO

CASSIO

In happy time, Iago.

CASSIO

Just in time, Iago.

IAGO

You have not been abed, then?

IAGO

You haven't gone to bed, then?

CASSIO

Why, no. The day had broke Before we parted. I have made bold, Iago, To send in to your wife. My suit to her Is that she will to virtuous Desdemona Procure me some access.

CASSIO

No. It was already daytime when we left each other. Iago, I've been bold enough to ask to speak to your wife. I will ask her to allow me to see the virtuous Desdemona. 

IAGO

I’ll send her to you presently, And I’ll devise a mean to draw the Moor Out of the way, that your converse and business May be more free.

IAGO

I'll send her to you right away. And I'll figure out a way to take the Moor somewhere out of the way, so that you can talk to her in private.

CASSIO

I humbly thank you for’t.

CASSIO

I humbly thank you for this.

Exit IAGO

I never knew a Florentine more kind and honest.

I've never known a kinder, more honest man from Florence.

Enter EMILIA

EMILIA

Good morrow, good Lieutenant. I am sorry For your displeasure, but all will sure be well. The general and his wife are talking of it, And she speaks for you stoutly. The Moor replies That he you hurt is of great fame in Cyprus And great affinity, and that in wholesome wisdom He might not but refuse you. But he protests he loves you And needs no other suitor but his likings To take the safest occasion by the front To bring you in again.

EMILIA

Good morning, good Lieutenant. I am sorry for what has happened to you, but I'm sure everything will turn out okay. The general and his wife are talking about the situation, and Desdemona is speaking up for you. Othello says that the man you hurt is well-known and well-liked in Cyprus, and that he has no choice but to refuse your appeal. But Othello insists that he still loves you, and doesn't need any persuading to put you back in your position when he gets the opportunity.

CASSIO

Yet I beseech you, If you think fit, or that it may be done, Give me advantage of some brief discourse With Desdemona alone.

CASSIO

Nonetheless, I beg you—if you think it's possible and a good idea—to let me talk with Desdemona alone for a little bit.

EMILIA

Pray you come in.I will bestow you where you shall have timeTo speak your bosom freely.

EMILIA

Please, come inside. I will give you a chance to talk to her freely.

CASSIO

I am much bound to you.

CASSIO

I owe you for this.

Exeunt

Othello
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Ben florman
About the Translator: Ben Florman

Ben is a co-founder of LitCharts. He holds a BA in English Literature from Harvard University, where as an undergraduate he won the Winthrop Sargent prize for best undergraduate paper on a topic related to Shakespeare.