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The Merchant of Venice

The Merchant of Venice Translation Act 2, Scene 8

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Enter SALERIO and SOLANIO

SALERIO

Why, man, I saw Bassanio under sail.With him is Gratiano gone along.And in their ship I am sure Lorenzo is not.

SALERIO

Man, I saw Bassanio sail away and Gratiano went along with him. And I'm sure that Lorenzo is not with them in their ship.

SOLANIO

The villain Jew with outcries raised the Duke, Who went with him to search Bassanio’s ship.

SOLANIO

That villainous Jew cried out for the Duke's help, and got him to search Bassanio's ship.

SALERIO

He came too late. The ship was under sail. But there the Duke was given to understand That in a gondola were seen together Lorenzo and his amorous Jessica. Besides, Antonio certified the Duke They were not with Bassanio in his ship.

SALERIO

He came too late. The ship had already set sail. But it was explained to the Duke that Lorenzo and his loving Jessica were seen together in a gondola. Besides, Antonio told the Duke that those two were not with Bassanio in his ship.

SOLANIO

I never heard a passion so confused, So strange, outrageous, and so variable, As the dog Jew did utter in the streets . “My daughter! O my ducats! O my daughter, Fled with a Christian! O my Christian ducats! Justice, the law, my ducats, and my daughter! A sealèd bag, two sealèd bags of ducats, Of double ducats, stol'n from me by my daughter! And jewels—two stones, two rich and precious stones— Stol'n by my daughter! Justice, find the girl! She hath the stones upon her, and the ducats.”

SOLANIO

I have never heard a passionate outburst of rage as confused, strange, outrageous, and varied as that dog the Jew uttered in the streets. He was yelling, "My daughter! Oh, my ducats! O my daughter, she ran away with a Christian! Oh, my ducats that now belong to a Christian! Justice, and the law! My ducats and my daughter! A sealed bag, two sealed bags of ducats, double the ducats, stolen from me by my own daughter! And jewels—two valuable, precious stones—stolen by my own daughter! Justice, I must find the girl! She has the jewels with her, and the ducats."

SALERIO

Why, all the boys in Venice follow him,Crying, “His stones, his daughter, and his ducats!”

SALERIO

All the boys in Venice were following him, crying out, "His jewels, his daughter, and his ducats!"

SOLANIO

Let good Antonio look he keep his day,Or he shall pay for this.

SOLANIO

Antonio had better be careful not to miss the deadline for paying Shylock back, or else he will pay for this.

SALERIO

Marry, well remembered. I reasoned with a Frenchman yesterday, Who told me, in the narrow seas that part The French and English, there miscarried A vessel of our country richly fraught. I thought upon Antonio when he told me, And wished in silence that it were not his.

SALERIO

Yes, indeed. I talked yesterday with a French person who told me that there was a shipwreck in the narrow waters that separate England and France involving a ship from our country carrying lots of riches. I thought of Antonio when he said this, and wished to myself that the ship was not his.

SOLANIO

You were best to tell Antonio what you hear—Yet do not suddenly, for it may grieve him.

SOLANIO

You'd better tell Antonio what you've heard. But tell him gently; it may upset him.

SALERIO

A kinder gentleman treads not the earth. I saw Bassanio and Antonio part. Bassanio told him he would make some speed Of his return. He answered, “Do not so. Slubber not business for my sake, Bassanio But stay the very riping of the time. And for the Jew’s bond which he hath of me, Let it not enter in your mind of love. Be merry, and employ your chiefest thoughts To courtship and such fair ostents of love As shall conveniently become you there.” And even there, his eye being big with tears, Turning his face, he put his hand behind him, And with affection wondrous sensible He wrung Bassanio’s hand. And so they parted.

SALERIO

No gentleman is as kind as Antonio is. I saw Bassanio and him leave each other. Bassanio told him he would come back quickly and Antonio replied, "Don't rush. Don't muddle your business for my sake, Bassanio, but rather stay as long as you need to. And don't worry about the agreement I have with the Jew. Be of good cheer and devote your thoughts to courtship and how you can best show your love there." And as his eyes filled with tears, he turned his face and put his hand out to shake Bassanio's hand with much affection. And that was how they parted.

SOLANIO

I think he only loves the world for him. I pray thee, let us go and find him out And quicken his embracèd heaviness With some delight or other.

SOLANIO

I think Bassanio means the world to Antonio. Please, let's go and find him and cheer him from his constant melancholy with some good times or something.

SALERIO

Do we so.

SALERIO

Yes, let's do that.

Exeunt

The merchant of venice
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Matt cosby
About the Translator: Matt Cosby
Matt Cosby graduated from Amherst College in 2011, and currently works as a writer and editor for LitCharts. He is from Florida but now lives in Portland, Oregon, where he also makes art, plays the piano, and goes to dog parks.