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The Taming of the Shrew

The Taming of the Shrew Translation Act 4, Scene 2

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Enter TRANIO as LUCENTIO and HORTENSIO as LITIO

TRANIO

[as LUCENTIO] Is ’t possible, friend Litio, that mistress BiancaDoth fancy any other but Lucentio?I tell you, sir, she bears me fair in hand.

TRANIO

[As LUCENTIO] Is it possible, my dear friend Litio, that Bianca could prefer another man over me? I tell you, sir, she's been very friendly towards me.

HORTENSIO

[as LITIO] Sir, to satisfy you in what I have said, Stand by and mark the manner of his teaching. They stand aside

HORTENSIO

[As LITIO] Sir, to prove to you what I've said, stand by right here and watch how this fellow teaches her. 

[They stand off to one side]

Enter BIANCA and LUCENTIO as CAMBIO

LUCENTIO

[as CAMBIO] Now, mistress, profit you in what you read?

LUCENTIO

[As CAMBIO] Now, mistress, have you been making progress in your studies?

BIANCA

What, master, read you? First resolve me that.

BIANCA

What are you studying, teacher? First answer me that.

LUCENTIO

[as CAMBIO] I read that I profess, The Art to Love.

LUCENTIO

[As CAMBIO] I study what I teach—The Art of Love.

BIANCA

And may you prove, sir, master of your art.

BIANCA

And may you prove, sir, to be a master of your art.

LUCENTIO

[as CAMBIO] While you, sweet dear, prove mistress of my heart!

LUCENTIO

[As CAMBIO] While you, sweet dear, prove to be the mistress of my heart!

HORTENSIO

[as LITIO] Quick proceeders, marry! Now, tell me, I pray,You that durst swear that your mistress BiancaLoved none in the world so well as Lucentio.

HORTENSIO

[As LITIO] How quickly he earns his degree! Now tell me, please, what just happened? I thought you swore that your mistress Bianca loved no one in the world better than Lucentio.

TRANIO

[as LUCENTIO] O despiteful love! Unconstant womankind! I tell thee, Litio, this is wonderful!

TRANIO

[As LUCENTIO] Oh spiteful love! Faithless womankind! I tell you, Litio, it's incredible!

HORTENSIO

Mistake no more. I am not Litio, Nor a musician as I seem to be, But one that scorn to live in this disguise For such a one as leaves a gentleman And makes a god of such a cullion. Know, sir, that I am called Hortensio.

HORTENSIO

Let me reveal myself. I am not Litio, and not a musician either. I refuse to continue with this disguise for the sake of a woman who would choose a low-class scoundrel over a gentleman like me. Know, sir, that I am called Hortensio.

TRANIO

[as LUCENTIO] Signior Hortensio, I have often heard Of your entire affection to Bianca, And since mine eyes are witness of her lightness, I will with you, if you be so contented, Forswear Bianca and her love for ever.

TRANIO

[As LUCENTIO] Sir Hortensio, I've often heard of your sincere affection for Bianca, and now that I've seen with my own eyes that she is unfaithful, I will join you, if you like, in rejecting Bianca and her love forever.

HORTENSIO

See how they kiss and court! Signior Lucentio, Here is my hand, and here I firmly vow Never to woo her more, but do forswear her As one unworthy all the former favors That I have fondly flattered her withal.

HORTENSIO

See how they kiss and flirt! Sir Lucentio, take my hand. I firmly vow to stop wooing her forever. I reject her as a woman unworthy of all the time and money I have so foolishly flattered her with.

TRANIO

And here I take the like unfeignèd oathNever to marry with her, though she would entreat.Fie on her! See how beastly she doth court him!

TRANIO

And I now make the same oath, never to marry her even if she begs me. Damn her! See how lustfully she flirts with him!

HORTENSIO

Would all the world but he had quite forsworn! For me, that I may surely keep mine oath, I will be married to a wealthy widow, Ere three days pass, which hath as long loved me As I have loved this proud disdainful haggard. And so farewell, Signior Lucentio. Kindness in women, not their beauteous looks, Shall win my love, and so I take my leave, In resolution as I swore before.

HORTENSIO

I wish all the world but him would reject her, so she'd have only that poor schoolteacher to accept her as a wife! But as for me, I will surely keep my promise. I plan to marry a wealthy widow before three days have passed. She's been in love with me for as long as I've been pursuing this proud, disdainful vixen. And so farewell, Sir Lucentio. From now on, kindness in women, not their beauty, will win my love. And so I bid you farewell, and am resolved to keep my promise.

Exit

TRANIO

Mistress Bianca, bless you with such grace As 'longeth to a lover’s blessèd case! Nay, I have ta'en you napping, gentle love, And have forsworn you with Hortensio.

TRANIO

Miss Bianca, may you be blessed with all the good fortune you deserve! No, I've caught you napping, my dear. Both Hortensio and I have rejected you.

BIANCA

Tranio, you jest. But have you both forsworn me?

BIANCA

You're joking, Tranio! But have you both really given me up?

TRANIO

Mistress, we have.

TRANIO

Mistress, we have.

LUCENTIO

Then we are rid of Litio.

LUCENTIO

Then we've gotten rid of Litio.

TRANIO

I' faith, he’ll have a lusty widow nowThat shall be wooed and wedded in a day.

TRANIO

Yes, now he'll have a lively widow for himself. He claims he'll woo her and marry her in a day.

BIANCA

God give him joy!

BIANCA

God give him joy!

TRANIO

Ay, and he’ll tame her.

TRANIO

Yes, and he'll tame her.

BIANCA

He says so, Tranio?

BIANCA

Did he say that, Tranio?

TRANIO

Faith, he is gone unto the taming school.

TRANIO

Well, he's gone off to the taming school.

BIANCA

The taming school? What, is there such a place?

BIANCA

The taming school? What, is there such a place?

TRANIO

Ay, mistress, and Petruchio is the master,That teacheth tricks eleven and twenty longTo tame a shrew and charm her chattering tongue.

TRANIO

Yes, mistress, and Petruchio is the headmaster. He teaches suitable tricks to tame a shrew and her chattering tongue.

Enter BIONDELLO

BIONDELLO

O master, master, I have watched so long That I am dog-weary, but at last I spied An ancient angel coming down the hill Will serve the turn.

BIONDELLO

Oh master, master, I've been watching for so long that I'm dog-tired, but at last I spied a good old fellow coming down the hill. He'll work for our needs.

TRANIO

What is he, Biondello?

TRANIO

Who is he, Biondello?

BIONDELLO

Master, a marcantant, or a pedant, I know not what, but formal in apparel,In gait and countenance surely like a father.

BIONDELLO

Master, I'm not sure if he's a merchant or a schoolmaster, but he's well-dressed and looks old and respectable enough to be Lucentio's father.

LUCENTIO

And what of him, Tranio?

LUCENTIO

And what will you do with him, Tranio?

TRANIO

If he be credulous and trust my tale, I’ll make him glad to seem Vincentio And give assurance to Baptista Minola As if he were the right Vincentio. Take in your love, and then let me alone.

TRANIO

If he's gullible and believes my story, then I'll make him happy to pretend to be Vincentio and vouch for you to Baptista Minola, just as if he were the real Vincentio. Take your sweetheart and leave this to me.

Exeunt LUCENTIO and BIANCA

Enter a MERCHANT

MERCHANT

God save you, sir.

MERCHANT

Hello and God bless you, sir.

TRANIO

[as LUCENTIO] And you, sir. You are welcome.Travel you far on, or are you at the farthest?

TRANIO

[As LUCENTIO] And you too, sir. Welcome. Are you going farther, or is this your destination?

MERCHANT

Sir, at the farthest for a week or two,But then up farther, and as far as Rome,And so to Tripoli, if God lend me life.

MERCHANT

Sir, this is my destination for a week or two, but then I'll go on as far as Rome, and then to Tripoli, if God is willing.

TRANIO

[as LUCENTIO] What countryman, I pray?

TRANIO

[As LUCENTIO] Where are you from, if I might ask?

MERCHANT

Of Mantua.

MERCHANT

From Mantua.

TRANIO

[as LUCENTIO] Of Mantua, sir? Marry, God forbid! And come to Padua, careless of your life?

TRANIO

[As LUCENTIO] Mantua, sir? God forbid! And you've come to Padua? Are you so careless with your life?

MERCHANT

My life, sir! how, I pray? For that goes hard.

MERCHANT

My life, sir! What do you mean? That sounds serious indeed.

TRANIO

'Tis death for anyone in Mantua To come to Padua. Know you not the cause? Your ships are stayed at Venice, and the Duke, For private quarrel ’twixt your duke and him, Hath published and proclaimed it openly. 'Tis marvel, but that you are but newly come, You might have heard it else proclaimed about.

TRANIO

It's death for anyone from Mantua to come to Padua. Don't you know why? The Duke of Padua proclaimed it openly. There's a private quarrel between him and your duke, and all the ships from Mantua are being impounded in Venice. It's amazing that you didn't know, but I guess you just arrived. Otherwise you would have heard it proclaimed all around town.

MERCHANT

Alas, sir, it is worse for me than so, For I have bills for money by exchangeFrom Florence, and must here deliver them.

MERCHANT

Alas, sir, this is bad news for me. I have money orders from Florence, and I must deliver them here.

TRANIO

[as LUCENTIO] Well, sir, to do you courtesy,This will I do, and this I will advise you.First tell me, have you ever been at Pisa?

TRANIO

[As LUCENTIO] Well, sir, I'll do you a favor, and help you out and give you some advice. But first tell me, have you ever been to Pisa?

MERCHANT

Ay, sir, in Pisa have I often been,Pisa renownèd for grave citizens.

MERCHANT

Yes, sir, I've often been to Pisa—Pisa, famous for its serious citizens.

TRANIO

[as LUCENTIO] Among them know you one Vincentio?

TRANIO

[As LUCENTIO] Do you know one of those citizens called Vincentio?

MERCHANT

I know him not, but I have heard of him:A merchant of incomparable wealth.

MERCHANT

I don't know him, but I've heard of him: a merchant of incomparable wealth.

TRANIO

[as LUCENTIO] He is my father, sir, and sooth to say,In count'nance somewhat doth resemble you.

TRANIO

[As LUCENTIO] He is my father, sir, and to be honest, you look a little bit like him.

BIONDELLO

[aside] As much as an apple doth an oyster, and all one.

BIONDELLO

[To himself] As much as an apple looks like an oyster, but that's no matter.

TRANIO

[as LUCENTIO] To save your life in this extremity, This favor will I do you for his sake— And think it not the worst of all your fortunes That you are like to Sir Vincentio— His name and credit shall you undertake, And in my house you shall be friendly lodged. Look that you take upon you as you should. You understand me, sir. So shall you stay Till you have done your business in the city. If this be court’sy, sir, accept of it.

TRANIO

[As LUCENTIO] I'll do you this favor for his sake, and to save your life in this dangerous situation—indeed, you should consider yourself lucky that you resemble Sir Vincentio. You'll pretend to be him, assume his name and reputation, and stay at my house as a guest. Just make sure that you play your part well. Do you understand, sir? This way you can stay until you've done your business in the city. If this is kindness, then accept it.

MERCHANT

O sir, I do, and will repute you ever The patron of my life and liberty.

MERCHANT

Oh sir, I will, and I'll always consider you the savior of my life and liberty.

TRANIO

(as LUCENTIO ) Then go with me to make the matter good. This, by the way, I let you understand: My father is here looked for every day To pass assurance of a dower in marriage 'Twixt me and one Baptista’s daughter here. In all these circumstances I’ll instruct you. Go with me to clothe you as becomes you.

TRANIO

[As LUCENTIO] Then come with me, and we'll get everything ready. By the way, I should also tell you this: my father is expected here any day now to come vouch for me about a widow's inheritance for my marriage. The marriage contract is between me and the daughter of a man named Baptista, who lives here. I'll instruct you about the rest of the details. Come with me, and I'll get you some new clothes.

Exeunt

The taming of the shrew
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Matt cosby
About the Translator: Matt Cosby
Matt Cosby graduated from Amherst College in 2011, and currently works as a writer and editor for LitCharts. He is from Florida but now lives in Portland, Oregon, where he also makes art, plays the piano, and goes to dog parks.