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The Taming of the Shrew

The Taming of the Shrew Translation Act 4, Scene 4

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Enter TRANIO as LUCENTIOMERCHANT booted and dressed like VINCENTIO

TRANIO

[as LUCENTIO] Sir, this is the house. Please it you that I call?

TRANIO

[As LUCENTIO] Sir, this is the house. Do you want me to knock?

MERCHANT

Ay, what else? and but I be deceived, Signior Baptista may remember me, Near twenty years ago, in Genoa, Where we were lodgers at the Pegasus.

MERCHANT

Yes, of course. Unless I'm mistaken, Sir Baptista might remember me, Sir Vincentio, from when we both stayed at the Pegasus in Genoa nearly twenty years ago.

TRANIO

[as LUCENTIO] 'Tis well; and hold your own, in any case,With such austerity as 'longeth to a father.

TRANIO

[As LUCENTIO] Very good. Now keep playing your part, and act as respectable as a father should.

MERCHANT

I warrant you.

MERCHANT

I swear I will.

Enter BIONDELLO

But, sir, here comes your boy.'Twere good he were schooled.

But sir, here comes your boy. He needs to learn his lines.

TRANIO

[as LUCENTIO] Fear you not him.—Sirrah Biondello,Now do your duty throughly, I advise you.Imagine ’twere the right Vincentio.

TRANIO

[As LUCENTIO] Don't worry about him.—Biondello, boy, now play your part well. Imagine this is the real Vincentio.

BIONDELLO

Tut, fear not me.

BIONDELLO

Ha, don't worry about me.

TRANIO

[as LUCENTIO] But hast thou done thy errand to Baptista?

TRANIO

[As LUCENTIO] But have you delivered the message to Baptista?

BIONDELLO

I told him that your father was at Venice,And that you looked for him this day in Padua.

BIONDELLO

I told him that your father was in Venice, and that you expected him in Padua today.

TRANIO

[as LUCENTIO] Thou'rt a tall fellow. Hold thee that to drink. Gives money

TRANIO

[As LUCENTIO] You're a fine fellow. Here, have a drink on me. 

[He gives BIONDELLO some money]

Enter BAPTISTA and LUCENTIO

Here comes Baptista. Set your countenance, sir.

Here comes Baptista. Look appropriately serious, sir.

MERCHANT takes off his cap

Signior Baptista, you are happily met.— [To the MERCHANT ] Sir, this is the gentleman I told you of. I pray you stand good father to me now. Give me Bianca for my patrimony.

Sir Baptista, it's good to see you.—

[To the MERCHANT] Sir, this is the gentleman I told you about. Please, be a good father to me now. Give me Bianca for my inheritance.

MERCHANT

[as VINCENTIO] Soft son.— Sir, by your leave, having come to Padua To gather in some debts, my son Lucentio Made me acquainted with a weighty cause Of love between your daughter and himself. And, for the good report I hear of you And for the love he beareth to your daughter And she to him, to stay him not too long, I am content, in a good father’s care, To have him matched. And if you please to like No worse than I, upon some agreement Me shall you find ready and willing With one consent to have her so bestowed, For curious I cannot be with you, Signior Baptista, of whom I hear so well.

MERCHANT

[As VINCENTIO] Quiet, son.—Sir, if I may—having come to Padua to collect some debts, my son Lucentio made me aware of the deep love between your daughter and himself. Because of the good reports I've heard about you, and for the sake of the love between your daughter and my son, I won't delay—I am glad to have him matched. And if you also approve of the marriage, then you'll find me ready and willing to consent to your daughter's betrothal. I won't be fussy about details with you, Sir Baptista, for I respect you.

BAPTISTA

Sir, pardon me in what I have to say. Your plainness and your shortness please me well. Right true it is your son Lucentio here Doth love my daughter and she loveth him, Or both dissemble deeply their affections. And therefore, if you say no more than this, That like a father you will deal with him And pass my daughter a sufficient dower, The match is made, and all is done. Your son shall have my daughter with consent.

BAPTISTA

Sir, pardon me for what I have to say. I like your plainness and honesty. It is indeed true that your son Lucentio here loves my daughter, and she loves him—unless they're both good at pretending. Therefore, if you have nothing else to say, and agree that you will treat your son as a father should and settle on a sufficient widow's inheritance for my daughter, then the match is made, and all's done. Your son will marry my daughter with my consent.

TRANIO

[as LUCENTIO] I thank you, sir. Where then do you know bestWe be affied and such assurance ta'enAs shall with either part’s agreement stand?

TRANIO

[As LUCENTIO] I thank you, sir. Where is the best place to draw up the necessary papers and settle this matter? 

BAPTISTA

Not in my house, Lucentio, for you know Pitchers have ears, and I have many servants. Besides, old Gremio is heark'ning still, And happily we might be interrupted.

BAPTISTA

Not in my house, Lucentio, for you know that I have many servants who might eavesdrop, and "little pitchers have big ears," as they say. Besides, old Gremio is always hanging around and listening, so we might be interrupted.

TRANIO

[as LUCENTIO] Then at my lodging, an it like you. There doth my father lie, and there this night We’ll pass the business privately and well. Send for your daughter by your servant here. My boy shall fetch the scrivener presently. The worst is this, that at so slender warning You are like to have a thin and slender pittance.

TRANIO

[As LUCENTIO] Then let's go to my lodging, if you'd like. That's where my father is staying, and tonight we can complete our transactions privately there. Send your servant for Bianca. My boy will fetch the notary right away. The only bad thing is that with such short notice, we'll only be able to offer you a small meal.

BAPTISTA

It likes me well. —Cambio, hie you home, And bid Bianca make her ready straight. And, if you will, tell what hath happenèd: Lucentio’s father is arrived in Padua, And how she’s like to be Lucentio’s wife.

BAPTISTA

That sounds good to me.—Cambio, hurry home and tell Bianca to get ready right away. And, if you want to, tell her what has happened: Lucentio's father has come to Padua, and now she's likely to be Lucentio's wife.

Exit LUCENTIO

BIONDELLO

I pray the gods she may, with all my heart!

BIONDELLO

With all my heart I pray to the gods that she will!

TRANIO

[as LUCENTIO] Dally not with the gods, but get thee gone.— Signior Baptista, shall I lead the way? Welcome! One mess is like to be your cheer. Come, sir, we will better it in Pisa.

TRANIO

[As LUCENTIO] Don't worry about the gods. Go on about your business.—Signor Baptista, should I lead the way? Welcome! We'll only have one course to feed you, but we'll make up for it in Pisa. Come, sir.

BAPTISTA

I follow you.

BAPTISTA

I'll follow you.

Exeunt TRANIO, MERCHANT, and BAPTISTA

BIONDELLO

Cambio.

BIONDELLO

Cambio.

LUCENTIO

What sayest thou, Biondello?

LUCENTIO

What is it, Biondello?

BIONDELLO

You saw my master wink and laugh upon you?

BIONDELLO

Did you see my master winking and laughing at you?

LUCENTIO

Biondello, what of that?

LUCENTIO

What about it, Biondello?

BIONDELLO

Faith, nothing; but 'has left me here behind to expound the meaning or moral of his signs and tokens.

BIONDELLO

Well, nothing. But he left me behind to explain the meaning of his signs and signals.

LUCENTIO

I pray thee, moralize them.

LUCENTIO

Please, explain them.

BIONDELLO

Then thus: Baptista is safe, talking with the deceivingfather of a deceitful son.

BIONDELLO

It's like this: Baptista is safely taken care of. He's talking with the pretend father of the pretend son.

LUCENTIO

And what of him?

LUCENTIO

And what else?

BIONDELLO

His daughter is to be brought by you to the supper.

BIONDELLO

You're to bring his daughter to dinner.

LUCENTIO

And then?

LUCENTIO

And then?

BIONDELLO

The old priest at Saint Luke’s Church is at your command at all hours.

BIONDELLO

The old priest at Saint Luke's Church is at your service at all hours.

LUCENTIO

And what of all this?

LUCENTIO

And what of all this?

BIONDELLO

I cannot tell, except they are busied about a counterfeit assurance. Take you assurance of her cum privilegio ad imprimendum solum. To th' church take the priest, clerk, and some sufficient honest witnesses. If this be not that you look for, I have no more to say, But bid Bianca farewell forever and a day.

BIONDELLO

I'm not sure, except that they are busy with some fake marriage contract. Go get your exclusive rights to that girl. Go to the church and take a priest, a clerk, and some honest-enough witnesses. If this isn't what you've been waiting for, then I have nothing more to say—but bid Bianca farewell forever.

LUCENTIO

Hear’st thou, Biondello?

LUCENTIO

Do you hear, Biondello—

BIONDELLO

I cannot tarry. I knew a wench married in an afternoon as she went to the garden for parsley to stuff a rabbit,and so may you, sir. And so adieu, sir. My master hath appointed me to go to Saint Luke’s to bid the priest be ready to come against you come with your appendix.

BIONDELLO

I can't linger. I once knew a girl who was married in the afternoon as she went out to the garden to look for parsley to stuff a rabbit. It may happen to you too, sir. And so farewell, sir. My master instructed me to go to Saint Luke's and tell the priest to be ready in anticipation of your arrival with your better half.

Exit

LUCENTIO

I may, and will, if she be so contented. She will be pleased. Then wherefore should I doubt? Hap what hap may, I’ll roundly go about her. It shall go hard if “Cambio” go without her.

LUCENTIO

I may, and I will, if she agrees. She will be pleased. Then why am I doubtful? What will be will be. I'll just be honest and straightforward with her. But it will be hard for "Cambio" if he loses her.

Exit

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Matt cosby
About the Translator: Matt Cosby
Matt Cosby graduated from Amherst College in 2011, and currently works as a writer and editor for LitCharts. He is from Florida but now lives in Portland, Oregon, where he also makes art, plays the piano, and goes to dog parks.