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The Tempest

The Tempest Translation Act 2, Scene 2

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CALIBAN enters, carrying a load of wood. There is a sound of thunder.

CALIBAN

All the infections that the sun sucks up From bogs, fens, flats, on Prosper fall and make him By inchmeal a disease! His spirits hear me And yet I needs must curse. But they’ll nor pinch, Fright me with urchin-shows, pitch me i' th' mire, Nor lead me like a firebrand in the dark Out of my way, unless he bid 'em. But For every trifle are they set upon me, Sometime like apes that mow and chatter at me, And after bite me, then like hedgehogs which Lie tumbling in my barefoot way and mount Their pricks at my footfall. Sometime am I All wound with adders who with cloven tongues Do hiss me into madness.

CALIBAN

May all the sicknesses that grow in swamps, marshes, and wetlands strike Prospero so that, little by little, he becomes nothing more than a disease! His spirits are spying on me, but I just have to curse him. Unless he tells the spirits to, they won’t pinch me; frighten me by appearing as hedgehog-shaped goblins; push me in the mud; or lead me the wrong way like a false guide in the night. But he does send them after me for every little thing I do. Sometimes his spirits come after me in the form of apes, chattering and making faces at me and then biting me. Sometimes they come in the shape of porcupines, lying curled up on the paths where I walk barefoot and pricking me when I step down. Sometimes poisonous snakes wrap around me, hissing with their forked tongues until I go crazy.

TRINCULO enters.

CALIBAN

Lo, now, lo! Here comes a spirit of his, and to torment me For bringing wood in slowly. I’ll fall flat. Perchance he will not mind me. [lies down, covered by his gaberdine]

CALIBAN

Look, right there, look! Here comes one of his spirits to punish me for bringing back the wood too slowly. I’ll lie down, flat on the ground. Maybe he won’t notice me.[He lies down, covering himself with his cloak]

TRINCULO

Here’s neither bush nor shrub to bear off any weather at all. And another storm brewing, I hear it sing i' th'wind. Yond same black cloud, yond huge one, looks like a foul bombard that would shed his liquor. If it should thunder as it did before, I know not where to hide my head. Yond same cloud cannot choose but fall by pailfuls. [sees CALIBAN] What have we here? A man or a fish? Dead or alive? A fish. He smells like a fish, a very ancient and fish-like smell, a kind of not-of-the-newest poor-john. A strange fish! Were I in England now, as once I was, and had but this fish painted, not a holiday fool there but would give a pieceof silver. There would this monster make a man. Any strange beast there makes a man. When they will not givea doit to relieve a lame beggar, they will lay out ten to see a dead Indian. Legged like a man and his fins like arms! Warm, o' my troth. I do now let loose my opinion, hold it no longer: this is no fish, but an islander that hath lately suffered by a thunderbolt.

TRINCULO

There aren’t any bushes or shrubs here to offer me even a little protection from the weather. And another storm is coming. I can hear it in the sound of the wind. That black cloud over there—the huge one—looks like a dirty leather canteen that’s about to drop the liquid it contains. If it storms like it did earlier, I don’t know where I’ll hide. That cloud is going to drop buckets of rain. [He sees CALIBAN] What do we have here? Is it a man or a fish? Is it dead or alive? It must be a fish. He smells like a fish, an old fish, like old cheap dried fish. What a strange fish! If I were in England now, as I was once before, and had a painting that showed this fish, every single fool there would give me a silver coin just to look at it. In England, this monster would make a man rich. But, then again, any strange beast there is just like a man. English people won’t give a penny to help a lame beggar, but they’ll give ten to see a dead Indian. This monster here has legs like a man but fins for arms! He’s still warm, too, by my faith. I no longer think this is a fish. I think now that it’s a native of the island who’s been struck by a lightning bolt.

Thunder.

TRINCULO

Alas, the storm is come again! My best way is to creep underhis gaberdine. T here is no other shelter hereabouts. Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows. I will here shroud till the dregs of the storm be past. [crawlsunder gaberdine]

TRINCULO

Oh no, the storm is returning! The best thing for me would be to crawl under his cloak. There’s no other shelter nearby. When times are tough, you’ll end up close to the strangest people. I’ll cover myself up here until the last of the storm passes. [He crawls under the cloak]

STEPHANO enters, singing.

STEPHANO

[sings] I shall no more to sea, to sea, Here shall I die ashore— This is a very scurvy tune to sing at a man’s funeral. Well, here’s my comfort. [drinks, sings] The master, the swabber, the boatswain, and I, The gunner and his mate Loved Mall, Meg, and Marian, and Margery, But none of us cared for Kate. For she had a tongue with a tang, Would cry to a sailor, “Go hang!” She loved not the savor of tar nor of pitch, Yet a tailor might scratch her where'ershe did itch. Then to sea, boys, and let her go hang! This is a scurvy tune too. But here’s my comfort. [drinks]

STEPHANO

[Singing]
I’ll never again go to sea, to sea,
I’ll die here on the shore—

This is a terrible song to sing at a man’s funeral. Well, here’s something to give me a bit of comfort. [He lifts a bottle of alcohol to his mouth, drinks, and sings again]
The master, the deck-cleaner, the boatswain, and I,
The gunman and his crewmate,
All loved Molly, Meg, Marian, and Margery
But none of us much liked Kate,
Because she spoke so cruelly,
And would shout to sailors, “Go hang!”
She did not like the smell of tar or pitch,
But would sleep with a tailor when she was in the mood.
So go to sea, boys, and let her go to hang!

That’s a wretched song too. But here’s my comfort. [He drinks]

CALIBAN

Do not torment me. Oh!

CALIBAN

Don’t punish me. Oh!

STEPHANO

What’s the matter? Have we devils here? Do you put tricks upon ’s with savages and men of Ind, ha? I have not ’scaped drowning to be afeard now of your four legs. Or it hath been said, “As proper a man as ever went on four legs cannot make him give ground,” and it shall be said so again while Stephano breathes at' nostrils.

STEPHANO

What’s happening? Are there devils here? Are you trying to trick me with these savages and men from the Indies, huh? I didn’t escape from drowning only to be frightened by your four legs. As the old saying goes, "He won't back up even for the most handsome man who ever walked on four legs." And they'll say it again for as long as I'm still alive and breathing.

CALIBAN

The spirit torments me. Oh!

CALIBAN

This spirit is torturing me. Oh!

STEPHANO

This is some monster of the isle with four legs who hath got, as I take it, an ague. Where the devil should he learn our language? I will give him some relief if itbe but for that. If I can recover him and keep him tameand get to Naples with him, he’s a present for any emperor that ever trod on neat’s leather.

STEPHANO

This is some four-legged monster of the island, who seems to have some kind of fever, as far as I can tell. How the devil did he learn our language? But since he does, I'll try to give him some relief from his pain. If I can get him better, tame him, and get him back to Naples, he’d be a perfect present to give to any emperor who's ever worn shoes.

CALIBAN

Do not torment me, prithee. I’ll bring my wood home faster.

CALIBAN

Don’t punish me, please. I’ll bring the wood home faster.

STEPHANO

He’s in his fit now and does not talk after the wisest.He shall taste of my bottle. If he have never drunk wine afore, it will go near to remove his fit. If I can recover him and keep him tame, I will not take too much for him. He shall pay for him that hath him, and that soundly.

STEPHANO

He’s having a fit, and saying things that don't make sense. I’ll give him a taste of the wine from my bottle. If he’s never drunk wine before, it’ll go a long way to stop his fit. If I can get him better and tame him, it would be impossible for me to charge too much for people to come and see him. He’ll make a lot of money to whoever owns him, that's for sure.

CALIBAN

Thou dost me yet but little hurt. Thou wilt anon, I know it by thy trembling. Now Prosper works upon thee.

CALIBAN

So far you haven’t hurt me much. You will soon, though, I can tell by your trembling. Prospero made you do this.

STEPHANO

[trying to give CALIBAN drink] Come on your ways. Open your mouth. Here is that which will give language to you, cat. Open your mouth. This will shake your shaking, I can tell you, and that soundly. You cannot tell who’s your friend. Open your chaps again.

STEPHANO

[Trying to get CALIBAN to drink] Come on now. Open your mouth. As the saying goes, "This good liquor will make a cat talk." Open your mouth. This’ll put an end to your trembling—I can tell you that for sure. [CALIBAN opens his mouth and drinks] You can't even recognize a friend. Open your mouth again.

TRINCULO

I should know that voice. It should be—But he is drowned, and these are devils. Oh, defend me!

TRINCULO

I think I recognize that voice. It must be...But he’s drowned, and I'm surrounded by devils. Oh, God protect me!

STEPHANO

Four legs and two voices—a most delicate monster.His forward voice now is to speak well of his friend. His backward voice is to utter foul speeches and to detract. If all the wine in my bottle will recover him, I will help his ague. Come. [CALIBAN drinks] Amen! I will pour some in thy other mouth.

STEPHANO

Four legs and two voices—this is a very unique monster. The voice near the front of him is speaking kindly about his friend. The voice near the back of him shouts curses and abusive language. Even if it takes all the wine in my bottle, I’ll cure his fever. Come on. [CALIBAN drinks] Amen to that! I’ll pour some in your other mouth now.

TRINCULO

Stephano!

TRINCULO

Stephano!

STEPHANO

Doth thy other mouth call me? Mercy, mercy! This is a devil, and no monster. I will leave him. I have no long spoon.

STEPHANO

Is your other mouth calling my name? Save me, save me! This is a devil, not a monster. I'm getting away from him. I'd be a fool to get involved with the devil.

TRINCULO

Stephano! If thou beest Stephano, touch me and speak tome. For I am Trinculo—be not afeard—thy good friend Trinculo.

TRINCULO

Stephano! If you are Stephano, touch me and speak to me. Because I’m Trinculo—don’t be scared—your good friend Trinculo.

STEPHANO

If thou beest Trinculo, come forth. I’ll pull thee by the lesser legs. If any be Trinculo’s legs, these are they. [pulls TRINCULO out from under the gaberdine] Thouart very Trinculo indeed! How camest thou to be the siege of this mooncalf? Can he vent Trinculos?

STEPHANO

If you are Trinculo, then come out from under there. I’ll pull on you by these smaller legs. If any of these four legs are Trinculo’s, these small ones are them. [He pulls TRINCULO out from under the cloak] You're really Trinculo! How did you end up being this monster’s excrement? Does he defecate Trinculos?

TRINCULO

I took him to be killed with a thunderstroke. But art thou not drowned, Stephano? I hope now thou art not drowned. Is the storm overblown? I hid me under the deadmooncalf’s gaberdine for fear of the storm. And art thou living, Stephano? O Stephano, two Neapolitans ’scaped! [dances STEPHANO about]

TRINCULO

I thought that he'd been killed by a bolt of lightning. But aren’t you drowned, Stephano? I hope now that you’re not drowned. Is the storm over? I hid under this dead monster’s cloak because I was afraid of the storm. Are you actually alive, Stephano? Oh, Stephano, two of us from Naples survived the shipwreck![TRINCULO grabs STEPHANO and dances him around]

STEPHANO

Prithee, do not turn me about. My stomach is not constant.

STEPHANO

Please, don't spin me around. My stomach’s not feeling well.

CALIBAN

[aside] These be fine things, an if they be not sprites. That’s a brave god and bears celestial liquor. I will kneel to him.

CALIBAN

[To himself] These are handsome beings, if they’re not spirits. That one's a noble god, who carries liquor from the heavens. I'll bow down before him.

STEPHANO

[to TRINCULO] How didst thou ’scape? How camest thou hither? Swear by this bottle how thou camest hither. I escaped upon a butt of sack which the sailors heaved o'erboard, by this bottle, which I made of the bark of atree with mine own hands since I was cast ashore.

STEPHANO

[To TRINCULO] How did you escape the shipwreck? How did you end up here? Swear on this bottle of wine how you got here. I swear on the bottle—which I made myself from the bark of a tree after I washed up on shore—that I survived by grabbing onto a barrel of wine that the sailors threw overboard during the storm.

CALIBAN

[To STEPHANO] I’ll swear upon that bottle to be thy true subject, for the liquor is not earthly.

CALIBAN

[To STEPHANO] I’ll swear on that wine bottle in order to become your loyal subject, because that wine must come from heaven.

STEPHANO

[to TRINCULO] Here. Swear then how thou escapedst.

STEPHANO

[To TRINCULO] Here, swear, and tell me how you escaped the wreck.

TRINCULO

Swum ashore, man, like a duck. I can swim like a duck, I’ll be sworn.

TRINCULO

I swam ashore, man, like a duck. I can swim like a duck, I swear it.

STEPHANO

Here, kiss the book. Though thou canst swim like a duck, thou art made like a goose.

STEPHANO

Here, kiss the Bible.[STEPHANO gives the bottle to TRINCULO] Though you can swim like a duck, you look like a silly goose.

TRINCULO drinks.

TRINCULO

O Stephano, hast any more of this?

TRINCULO

Oh Stephano, do you have any more of this wine?

STEPHANO

The whole butt, man. My cellar is in a rock by th' seaside where my wine is hid.—How now, mooncalf? How does thine ague?

STEPHANO

I have the whole barrel, man. I keep it in my wine cellar—a cave by the seaside, where I've stowed away the wine barrel.

[To CALIBAN] What’s going on, monster? How is your fever?

CALIBAN

Hast thou not dropped from heaven?

CALIBAN

Have you come down to this island from heaven?

STEPHANO

Out o' th' moon, I do assure thee. I was the man i’ themoon when time was.

STEPHANO

We come from the moon, I promise you. Once upon a time, I was the man in the moon.

CALIBAN

I have seen thee in her and I do adore thee. My mistress showed me thee and thy dog and thy bush.

CALIBAN

I’ve seen you in the moon, and I love you. My mother showed you to me, as well as your dog and bundle of sticks.

STEPHANO

Come, swear to that, kiss the book. I will furnish it anon with new contents, swear.

STEPHANO

Come here, and swear that what you just said was true by kissing the “book.” [STEPHANO gives the bottle to CALIBAN] I’ll fill it back up again soon, I promise.

CALIBAN drinks.

TRINCULO

By this good light, this is a very shallow monster. I afeard of him! A very weak monster. The man i' th' moon!A most poor credulous monster.— Well drawn, monster, in good sooth!

TRINCULO

Now that I see him in this brighter light, it’s clear that he’s not much of a monster. I used to be scared of him! He’s a pretty unconvincing monster. The man in the moon! He’s a poor, gullible monster. 

[To CALIBAN] That’s a good swig of wine you just took, monster! I mean it!

CALIBAN

[to STEPHANO] I’ll show thee every fertile inch o' th' island.And I will kiss thy foot. I prithee, be my god.

CALIBAN

[To STEPHANO] I’ll show you every inch of good land on this island. And I’ll kiss your feet. Please, be my god.

TRINCULO

By this light, a most perfidious and drunken monster.When ’s god’s asleep, he’ll rob his bottle.

TRINCULO

Now I can see that he’s a lying, drunken monster. When his “god” falls asleep, he’ll steal the wine bottle.

CALIBAN

[to STEPHANO] I’ll kiss thy foot. I’ll swear myself thysubject.

CALIBAN

[To STEPHANO] I’ll kiss your feet. I’ll take an oath that I’m your loyal subject.

STEPHANO

Come on then. Down, and swear.

STEPHANO

Come on, then. Kneel down and swear.

TRINCULO

I shall laugh myself to death at this puppy-headed monster.A most scurvy monster. I could find in my heart to beathim—

TRINCULO

I’m going to laugh myself to death at this foolish monster. A disgraceful monster. I could find it in my heart to beat him—

STEPHANO

[To CALIBAN] Come, kiss.

STEPHANO

[To CALIBAN] Now, kiss my feet.

TRINCULO

But that the poor monster’s in drink. An abominable monster!

TRINCULO

—except that the poor monster is drunk. A repulsive monster!

CALIBAN

I’ll show thee the best springs. I’ll pluck thee berries. I’ll fish for thee and get thee wood enough. A plague upon the tyrant that I serve! I’ll bear him no more sticks, but follow thee, Thou wondrous man.

CALIBAN

I’ll show you the best sources of fresh water. I’ll pick berries for you. I’ll fish for you and gather enough firewood for you. May the tyrant I’m serving now die of the plague! I won’t carry any more wood for him. Instead, I’ll serve you now, you miraculous man.

TRINCULO

A most ridiculous monster, to make a wonder of a poor drunkard.

TRINCULO

What a ridiculous monster, to see a poor drunk man and think him a miracle.

CALIBAN

[to STEPHANO] I prithee, let me bring thee where crabs grow. And I with my long nails will dig thee pignuts, Show thee a jay’s nest, and instruct thee how To snare the nimble marmoset. I’ll bring thee To clustering filberts, and sometimes I’ll get thee Young scamels from the rock. Wilt thou go with me?

CALIBAN

[To STEPHANO] Please, let me show you where you can catch crabs to eat. I’ll dig with my long fingernails to find you peanuts. I’ll show you a bird’s nest with eggs inside, and teach you how to catch a quick-moving monkey. I’ll lead you to clusters of hazelnuts, and sometimes I’ll catch seagulls for you on the rocks. Will you come with me?

STEPHANO

I prithee now, lead the way without any more talking. Trinculo, the king and all our company else being drowned, we will inherit here. Here, bear my bottle. Fellow Trinculo, we’ll fill him by and by again.

STEPHANO

Please, lead the way without doing any more talking. Trinculo, since the king and everyone else we were with have drowned, we’re the rightful owners of this place. Here, carry my wine bottle. My good friend Trinculo, we’ll fill that bottle again soon.

CALIBAN

[sings drunkenly] Farewell, master! Farewell, farewell.

CALIBAN

[Singing drunkenly]
Goodbye, master! Goodbye, goodbye.

TRINCULO

A howling monster, a drunken monster.

TRINCULO

A singing, drunken monster.

CALIBAN

[sings] No more dams I’ll make for fish, Nor fetch in firing At requiring, Nor scrape trencher, nor wash dish. 'Ban, 'Ban, Ca-Caliban Has a new master. Get a new man. Freedom, high-day! High-day, freedom! Freedom, high-day, freedom!

CALIBAN

[Singing]
I won’t build any more dams to catch you fish,
Whenever you want,
Or scrape clean the platters, or wash dishes.
'Ban, 'Ban, Ca-Caliban
Has a new master. Get yourself a new servant.
Freedom, hooray, hooray, freedom, freedom, hooray, freedom!

STEPHANO

O brave monster! Lead the way.

STEPHANO

Oh, splendid monster! Lead on.

They exit.

The tempest
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Ben florman
About the Translator: Ben Florman

Ben is a co-founder of LitCharts. He holds a BA in English Literature from Harvard University, where as an undergraduate he won the Winthrop Sargent prize for best undergraduate paper on a topic related to Shakespeare.