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The Two Gentlemen of Verona

The Two Gentlemen of Verona Translation Act 4, Scene 2

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Enter PROTEUS

PROTEUS

Already have I been false to Valentine And now I must be as unjust to Turio. Under the colour of commending him, I have access my own love to prefer: But Silvia is too fair, too true, too holy, To be corrupted with my worthless gifts. When I protest true loyalty to her, She twits me with my falsehood to my friend; When to her beauty I commend my vows, She bids me think how I have been forsworn In breaking faith with Julia whom I loved: And notwithstanding all her sudden quips, The least whereof would quell a lover's hope, Yet, spaniel-like, the more she spurns my love, The more it grows and fawneth on her still. But here comes Turio: now must we to her window, And give some evening music to her ear.

PROTEUS

I have already lied to Valentine, and now I have to be unfair to Turio. Under the pretense of praising him, I have access to my own love, and can praise her. But Silvia is too beautiful, too true, too saintly, to be corrupted by my worthless gifts. When I swear true loyalty to her, she'll taunt me for how falsely I've treated my friend. When I declare my vows to her beauty, she'll ask me to think about how I have broken a promise to Julia, whom I loved. Despite all her sudden sharp retorts—the smallest of which would crush a lover's hope—I'll be devoted to her like a dog. The more she rejects my love, the more it grows and flatters her still. But here comes Turio. Now we must go to her window, and play some evening music for her.

Enter TURIO and Musicians

TURIO

How now, Sir Proteus, are you crept before us?

TURIO

How are you, Sir Proteus? Have you snuck here quietly before us?

PROTEUS

Ay, gentle Turio: for you know that loveWill creep in service where it cannot go.

PROTEUS

Yes, noble Turio. Because you know that love will crawl in service where it is forbidden to go.

TURIO

Ay, but I hope, sir, that you love not here.

TURIO

Yes. But I hope, sir, that you don't come here as a lover.

PROTEUS

Sir, but I do; or else I would be hence.

PROTEUS

But I do, sir. Otherwise I wouldn't be here.

TURIO

Who? Silvia?

TURIO

Whom do you love? Silvia?

PROTEUS

Ay, Silvia; for your sake.

PROTEUS

Yes, Silvia—in your name.

TURIO

I thank you for your own. Now, gentlemen,Let's tune, and to it lustily awhile.

TURIO

Thank you, for your own sake, that you made your meaning clear. Now, gentlemen, let's play and do so heartily!

Enter, at a distance, Host, and JULIA in boy's clothes

HOST

Now, my young guest, methinks you're allycholly: Ipray you, why is it?

HOST

My young guest, I think you're melancholic. Tell me, what's wrong?

JULIA

Marry, mine host, because I cannot be merry.

JULIA

Indeed, I can't be happy, my host.

HOST

Come, we'll have you merry: I'll bring you whereyou shall hear music and see the gentleman that you asked for.

HOST

Come, we'll make you happy! I'll bring you where you will hear music, and see the gentleman that you asked for.

JULIA

But shall I hear him speak?

JULIA

But will I hear him speak?

HOST

Ay, that you shall.

HOST

Yes, you will.

JULIA

That will be music.

JULIA

Now that will be music.

Music plays

HOST

Hark, hark!

HOST

Listen, listen!

JULIA

Is he among these?

JULIA

Is he among these gentlemen?

HOST

Ay: but, peace! Let's hear 'em.

HOST

Yes, but quiet! Let's hear them!

PROTEUS/MUSICIAN

[sings the song] Who is Silvia? What is she? That all our swains commend her? Holy, fair and wise is she; The heaven such grace did lend her, That she might admired be. Is she kind as she is fair? For beauty lives with kindness. Love doth to her eyes repair, To help him of his blindness, And, being help'd, inhabits there. Then to Silvia let us sing, That Silvia is excelling; She excels each mortal thing Upon the dull earth dwelling: To her let us garlands bring.

PROTEUS/MUSICIAN

[Singing]
Who is Silvia? What is she? 
That all our lovers praise her? 
She is saintly, beautiful and wise. 
The heavens lent her such virtue, 
So that she might be admired. 
Is she as kind as she is beautiful? 
Because beauty lives with kindness. 
Love hastens to her eyes, 
To help him with his blindness, 
And being helped, stays there. 
Then let us sing to Silvia, 
That Silvia is perfection. 
She is better than every mortal thing
Dwelling on this dull earth: 
Let us bring wreaths to her.

HOST

How now! Are you sadder than you were before? Howdo you, man? The music likes you not.

HOST

What's this? Are you sadder than you were before? What's wrong, man? The music doesn't please you.

JULIA

You mistake; the musician likes me not.

JULIA

You're wrong. The musician doesn't please me.

HOST

Why, my pretty youth?

HOST

Why, my pretty young boy?

JULIA

He plays false, father.

JULIA

He plays out of tune, old man.

HOST

How? Out of tune on the strings?

HOST

Out of tune on the strings?

JULIA

Not so; but yet so false that he grieves my veryheart-strings.

JULIA

No. But yet he's so out of tune that he makes my heart-strings sad.

HOST

You have a quick ear.

HOST

You have a sharp ear.

JULIA

Ay, I would I were deaf; it makes me have a slow heart.

JULIA

Yes. I wish that I were deaf. This is making my heart heavy.

HOST

I perceive you delight not in music.

HOST

I see that you don't enjoy music.

JULIA

Not a whit, when it jars so.

JULIA

Not at all, when it sounds discordant like this. 

HOST

Hark, what fine change is in the music!

HOST

Listen, what a nice variation in the music!

JULIA

Ay, that change is the spite.

JULIA

Yes, that change is what vexes me.

HOST

You would have them always play but one thing?

HOST

You would have them always play only one melody?

JULIA

I would always have one play but one thing.But, host, doth this Sir Proteus that we talk onOften resort unto this gentlewoman?

JULIA

I would always have one play only one melody. But, host, does this Sir Proteus that we are talking about come to see this gentlewoman often?

HOST

I tell you what Lance, his man, told me: he lovedher out of all nick.

HOST

I'll tell you what his servant Lance told me. He loved her beyond reckoning. 

JULIA

Where is Lance?

JULIA

Where is Lance?

HOST

Gone to seek his dog; which tomorrow, by hismaster's command, he must carry for a present to his lady.

HOST

He's gone to look for his dog, which he must carry to his lady as a present tomorrow—as his master ordered. 

JULIA

Peace! Stand aside: the company parts.

JULIA

Quiet! Let's back up. The men are leaving. [JULIA and the HOST step back, unseen by the others]

PROTEUS

Sir Turio, fear not you: I will so pleadThat you shall say my cunning drift excels.

PROTEUS

Sir Turio, don't be afraid. I will carry on so that you shall say my clever plan is successful. 

TURIO

Where meet we?

TURIO

Where should we meet?

PROTEUS

At Saint Gregory's well.

PROTEUS

At Saint Gregory's Well. 

TURIO

Farewell.

TURIO

Goodbye.

Exeunt TURIO and Musicians

Enter SILVIA above.

PROTEUS

Madam, good even to your ladyship.

PROTEUS

Madam, good evening to your Ladyship.

SILVIA

I thank you for your music, gentlemen.Who is that that spake?

SILVIA

Thank you for your music, gentlemen. Who was the man that spoke to me? 

PROTEUS

One, lady, if you knew his pure heart's truth,You would quickly learn to know him by his voice.

PROTEUS

One whose voice you would quickly learn to recognize, if you knew the truth of his pure heart.

SILVIA

Sir Proteus, as I take it.

SILVIA

I take it that it's Sir Proteus. 

PROTEUS

Sir Proteus, gentle lady, and your servant.

PROTEUS

Sir Proteus, noble lady. I am your servant.

SILVIA

What's your will?

SILVIA

What's your intent?

PROTEUS

That I may compass yours.

PROTEUS

That I may fulfill your wishes.

SILVIA

You have your wish; my will is even this: That presently you hie you home to bed. Thou subtle, perjured, false, disloyal man! Think'st thou I am so shallow, so conceitless, To be seduced by thy flattery, That hast deceived so many with thy vows? Return, return, and make thy love amends. For me, by this pale queen of night I swear, I am so far from granting thy request That I despise thee for thy wrongful suit, And by and by intend to chide myself Even for this time I spend in talking to thee.

SILVIA

You have your wish. My wish is this: that you hurry home to bed immediately. You treacherous, lying, false, disloyal man! Do you think that I am so shallow, so witless that I can be seduced by your flattery; you that have deceived so many with your promises? Return, return, and make things right with your beloved. I swear by this moon that I am so far from agreeing to your request that I hate you and your insulting courtship. And for that, I plan to scold myself for spending even this time talking to you. 

PROTEUS

I grant, sweet love, that I did love a lady;But she is dead.

PROTEUS

I agree, sweet love, that I did love a lady. But she is dead.

JULIA

[Aside] 'Twere false, if I should speak it;For I am sure she is not buried.

JULIA

[To herself] That's not true, if I should say it. I'm sure she's not buried yet.

SILVIA

Say that she be; yet Valentine thy friend Survives; to whom, thyself art witness, I am betroth'd : and art thou not ashamed To wrong him with thy importunacy?

SILVIA

Even if she is dead, your friend Valentine is alive. You know that we are engaged, and yet you're not ashamed to wrong him with your persistent courtship? 

PROTEUS

I likewise hear that Valentine is dead.

PROTEUS

I also heard that Valentine is dead.

SILVIA

And so suppose am I; for in his graveAssure thyself my love is buried.

SILVIA

So then, imagine that I am dead too. You can be sure that my love is buried with Valentine in his grave.

PROTEUS

Sweet lady, let me rake it from the earth.

PROTEUS

Sweet lady, let me gather your buried love from the earth.

SILVIA

Go to thy lady's grave and call hers thence,Or, at the least, in hers sepulchre thine.

SILVIA

Go to your lady's grave, and call her there. Or at least bury your love with hers there.

JULIA

[Aside] He heard not that.

JULIA

[To herself] He didn't hear that.

PROTEUS

Madam, if your heart be so obdurate, Vouchsafe me yet your picture for my love, The picture that is hanging in your chamber; To that I'll speak, to that I'll sigh and weep: For since the substance of your perfect self Is else devoted, I am but a shadow; And to your shadow will I make true love.

PROTEUS

Madam, if your heart is so unyielding, allow me to get your picture for my love. The picture that is hanging in your room. I'll speak to that; I'll sigh and cry to that. Since the substance of your perfect self is devoted elsewhere, I am only a shadow. I will woo your image. 

JULIA

[Aside] If 'twere a substance, you would, sure,deceive it,And make it but a shadow, as I am.

JULIA

[To herself] If this picture of Silvia were a real live woman, you would be unfaithful to it. You'd act as if it were a mere shadow to be discarded—the same way you've treated me. 

SILVIA

I am very loath to be your idol, sir; But since your falsehood shall become you well To worship shadows and adore false shapes, Send to me in the morning and I'll send it: And so, good rest.

SILVIA

I hate to be your idol, sir. It would be just like you to worship shadows and adore false shapes, because you are so false to women. Send for the picture in the morning and I'll give it to you. And so, goodnight.

PROTEUS

As wretches have o'ernightThat wait for execution in the morn.

PROTEUS

I feel like the wretches who have to wait overnight for an execution in the morning.

Exeunt PROTEUS and SILVIA severally

JULIA

Host, will you go?

JULIA

Host, will you go?

HOST

By my halidom, I was fast asleep.

HOST

By all I consider holy, I fell asleep.

JULIA

Pray you, where lies Sir Proteus?

JULIA

Tell me, where is Sir Proteus staying?

HOST

Marry, at my house. Trust me, I think 'tis almostday.

HOST

Indeed, at my inn. Trust me, I think it's almost day.

JULIA

Not so; but it hath been the longest nightThat e'er I watch'd and the most heaviest.

JULIA

No, it's not. But it has been the longest night that I've ever stayed up, and the most sorrowful. 

Exeunt

The two gentlemen of verona
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Nina romancikova
About the Translator: Nina Romancikova

Nina Romancikova is from Slovakia but her love of literature and theater has brought her to the UK and she has been living and studying there for the past six years. She graduated with a degree in English Literature and Language at University of Glasgow in 2016. Nina is now finishing her Masters in Shakespeare Studies at King's College London and is currently working as a Research Intern at Shakespeare's Globe.