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The Two Gentlemen of Verona

The Two Gentlemen of Verona Translation Act 5, Scene 2

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Enter TURIO, PROTEUS, and JULIA

TURIO

Sir Proteus, what says Silvia to my suit?

TURIO

Sir Proteus, what does Silvia say about my wooing?

PROTEUS

O, sir, I find her milder than she was;And yet she takes exceptions at your person.

PROTEUS

Oh, sir, I think she is more gracious than she was before. And yet, she is not so sure about your physical appearance. 

TURIO

What, that my leg is too long?

TURIO

What? Is it because my legs are too long?

PROTEUS

No; that it is too little.

PROTEUS

No, it's because your legs are too thin.

TURIO

I'll wear a boot, to make it somewhat rounder.

TURIO

I'll wear boots to make my legs look a bit thicker.

JULIA

[Aside] But love will not be spurr'd to whatit loathes.

JULIA

[To herself] But love won't be inspired by something it hates.

TURIO

What says she to my face?

TURIO

What does she say about my face?

PROTEUS

She says it is a fair one.

PROTEUS

She says it's pale.

TURIO

Nay then, the wanton lies; my face is black.

Turio

No, I think that willful woman lies. My face is tan.

PROTEUS

But pearls are fair; and the old saying is,Black men are pearls in beauteous ladies' eyes.

PROTEUS

But pearls are white. And the old saying goes that tan men are pearls in the eyes of beautiful ladies.

JULIA

[Aside] 'Tis true; such pearls as put outladies' eyes;For I had rather wink than look on them.

JULIA

[To herself] That's true. Such pearls make ladies' eyes useless. I would rather shut my eyes than look at them.

TURIO

How likes she my discourse?

TURIO

How does she like my conversation?

PROTEUS

Ill, when you talk of war.

PROTEUS

She doesn't like it when you talk about violence.

TURIO

But well, when I discourse of love and peace?

TURIO

Then, what does she think when I speak about love and peace?

JULIA

[Aside] But better, indeed, when you hold your peace.

JULIA

[To herself] It's better when you just keep silent.

TURIO

What says she to my valour?

TURIO

What does she say about my bravery?

PROTEUS

O, sir, she makes no doubt of that.

PROTEUS

Oh, sir, she has no doubt of that.

JULIA

[Aside] She needs not, when she knows it cowardice.

JULIA

[To herself] She doesn't need to doubt your bravery, because she knows that you're a coward.

TURIO

What says she to my birth?

TURIO

What does she say about my noble ancestry?

PROTEUS

That you are well derived.

PROTEUS

That you are well descended.

JULIA

[Aside] True; from a gentleman to a fool.

JULIA

[To herself] True. You've gone from a gentleman to a fool.

TURIO

Considers she my possessions?

turio

Does she consider my possessions?

PROTEUS

O, ay; and pities them.

PROTEUS

Oh, yes, and she feels sorry for them.

TURIO

Wherefore?

TURIO

Why?

JULIA

[Aside] That such an ass should owe them.

JULIA

[To herself] Because such an ass owns them. 

PROTEUS

That they are out by lease.

PROTEUS

That they are borrowed or rented and not entirely in your possession. 

JULIA

Here comes the duke.

JULIA

Here comes the Duke. 

Enter DUKE

DUKE

How now, Sir Proteus! How now, Turio!Which of you saw Sir Eglamour of late?

DUKE

Sir Proteus! How's it going? And Turio, how are you? Which of you saw Sir Eglamour recently?

TURIO

Not I.

TURIO

I didn't.

PROTEUS

Nor I.

PROTEUS

Neither did I. 

DUKE

Saw you my daughter?

DUKE

Have you seen my daughter?

PROTEUS

Neither.

PROTEUS

Not her either.

DUKE

Why then, She's fled unto that peasant Valentine; And Eglamour is in her company. 'Tis true; for Friar Laurence met them both, As he in penance wander'd through the forest; Him he knew well, and guess'd that it was she, But, being mask'd, he was not sure of it; Besides, she did intend confession At Patrick's cell this even; and there she was not; These likelihoods confirm her flight from hence. Therefore, I pray you, stand not to discourse, But mount you presently and meet with me Upon the rising of the mountain-foot That leads towards Mantua, whither they are fled: Dispatch, sweet gentlemen, and follow me.

DUKE

Well, then, she has run away to find that peasant Valentine, and Eglamour has accompanied her. It's true. Friar Lawrence has met them both as he wandered through the forest, repenting. He recognized Eglamour, and guessed that it was Silvia—but since she was masked, he wasn't sure of it. Besides, she was planning on going to confession tonight at Patrick's place, but she wasn't there. All of these instances confirm that she has run away. Therefore, please, don't delay by talking. Get on horseback at once, and meet me by the base of the mountain that leads toward Mantua, where they are going. Hurry up, sweet gentlemen, and follow me. 

Exit

TURIO

Why, this it is to be a peevish girl, That flies her fortune when it follows her. I'll after, more to be revenged on Eglamour Than for the love of reckless Silvia.

TURIO

Well, she's a foolish girl for fleeing from a good courtship when it follows her. I'll go after her—not so much because I love the uncaring Silvia, but more because I want to take revenge on Eglamour.

Exit

PROTEUS

And I will follow, more for Silvia's loveThan hate of Eglamour that goes with her.

PROTEUS

And I'll follow—because I love Silvia more than I hate Eglamour, who accompanies her.

Exit

JULIA

And I will follow, more to cross that loveThan hate for Silvia that is gone for love.

JULIA

And I'll follow, so I can frustrate Proteus' love—not because I hate Silvia, who has left for love's sake.

Exit

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Nina romancikova
About the Translator: Nina Romancikova

Nina Romancikova is from Slovakia but her love of literature and theater has brought her to the UK and she has been living and studying there for the past six years. She graduated with a degree in English Literature and Language at University of Glasgow in 2016. Nina is now finishing her Masters in Shakespeare Studies at King's College London and is currently working as a Research Intern at Shakespeare's Globe.