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Titus Andronicus

Titus Andronicus Translation Act 2, Scene 2

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Enter TITUS ANDRONICUS, with Hunters, & c., MARCUS, LUCIUS, QUINTUS, and MARTIUS

TITUS ANDRONICUS

The hunt is up, the morn is bright and grey, The fields are fragrant and the woods are green: Uncouple here and let us make a bay And wake the emperor and his lovely bride And rouse the prince and ring a hunter's peal, That all the court may echo with the noise. Sons, let it be your charge, as it is ours, To attend the emperor's person carefully: I have been troubled in my sleep this night, But dawning day new comfort hath inspired.

TITUS ANDRONICUS

It's time to hunt—the morning is bright and gray, the fields are sweet-smelling, and the trees are in bloom. Let's separate here and make some noise to wake up the emperor and his lovely bride; we'll make enough sound to wake up the prince too, and the whole court. Sons, make sure you watch the emperor carefully, as I will. I had a bad night's sleep, but felt better when I woke up. 

A cry of hounds and horns, winded in a peal. Enter SATURNINUS, TAMORA, BASSIANUS, LAVINIA, DEMETRIUS, CHIRON, and Attendants

TITUS ANDRONICUS

Many good morrows to your majesty;Madam, to you as many and as good:I promised your grace a hunter's peal.

TITUS ANDRONICUS

Good morning, your majesty; and madam, good morning to you, too. I promised that I would wake you up with the sound of the hunt.

SATURNINUS

And you have rung it lustily, my lord;Somewhat too early for new-married ladies.

SATURNINUS

And you have made quite a noise, my lord—somewhat too early for ladies who just got married. 

BASSIANUS

Lavinia, how say you?

BASSIANUS

Lavinia, what do you think?

LAVINIA

I say, no;I have been broad awake two hours and more.

LAVINIA

I disagree; I've been awake for more than two hours already.

SATURNINUS

Come on, then; horse and chariots let us have,And to our sport. [To TAMORA] Madam, now shall ye seeOur Roman hunting.

SATURNINUS

Come on, then; let's get our horses and chariots and begin the hunt.

[To TAMORA] Madam, now you'll see our Roman hunting. 

MARCUS ANDRONICUS

I have dogs, my lord,Will rouse the proudest panther in the chase,And climb the highest promontory top.

MARCUS ANDRONICUS

I have dogs, my lord, that can outrun the proudest panther in the chase, and climb the highest tops of the mountains. 

TITUS ANDRONICUS

And I have horse will follow where the gameMakes way, and run like swallows o'er the plain.

TITUS ANDRONICUS

And I have horses that will follow wherever the prey goes, flying like swallows over the open field. 

DEMETRIUS

Chiron, we hunt not, we, with horse nor hound,But hope to pluck a dainty doe to ground.

DEMETRIUS

Chiron, we don't hunt with horses or dogs—but hope to catch a dainty doe, nonetheless. 

Exeunt

Titus andronicus
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Eve houghton
About the Translator: Eve Houghton

Eve Houghton graduated from Yale College in 2017 and is currently pursuing the MPhil in Renaissance Literature at the University of Cambridge. In 2018, she will return to Yale to begin her PhD in English. Her research interests include early modern commonplace books and note-taking practices, paratexts, reception studies, and the history of reading.