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Troilus and Cressida

Troilus and Cressida Translation Act 4, Scene 2

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Enter TROILUS and CRESSIDA

TROILUS

Dear, trouble not yourself: the morn is cold.

TROILUS

Don't get up, my dear, it's cold this morning.

CRESSIDA

Then, sweet my lord, I'll call mine uncle down;He shall unbolt the gates.

CRESSIDA

Then I'll have my uncle open the gates, my lord.

TROILUS

Trouble him not; To bed, to bed: sleep kill those pretty eyes, And give as soft attachment to thy senses As infants' empty of all thought!

TROILUS

Don't trouble him, go to bed, go to bed. Let sleep close your beautiful eyes, and rest peacefully.

CRESSIDA

Good morrow, then.

CRESSIDA

Goodbye, then.

TROILUS

I prithee now, to bed.

TROILUS

I beg you, go to sleep.

CRESSIDA

Are you a-weary of me?

CRESSIDA

Are you tired of me?

TROILUS

O Cressida! but that the busy day,Waked by the lark, hath roused the ribald crows,And dreaming night will hide our joys no longer,I would not from thee.

TROILUS

Oh Cressida! If it was still night and day hadn't broken, I'd stay with you.

CRESSIDA

Night hath been too brief.

CRESSIDA

Night has been too short.

TROILUS

Beshrew the witch! with venomous wights she stays As tediously as hell, but flies the grasps of love With wings more momentary-swift than thought. You will catch cold, and curse me.

TROILUS

Curse the witch! If you have troubled sleep she seems to last forever, but if you are holding your lover she barely lasts long enough to realize. You'll catch a cold and hate me, if you stay out at this time of day.

CRESSIDA

Prithee, tarry: You men will never tarry. O foolish Cressid! I might have still held off, And then you would have tarried. Hark! there's one up.

CRESSIDA

I beg you, stay. You men never stick around. Oh foolish Cressida! If I hadn't given in to you you might have stayed. Listen! Someone's nearby.

PANDARUS

[Within] What, 's all the doors open here?

PANDARUS

[Within] What, why are all the doors open?

TROILUS

It is your uncle.

TROILUS

It is your uncle.

CRESSIDA

A pestilence on him! now will he be mocking:I shall have such a life!

CRESSIDA

Curse him. He's going to start mocking me again. I'll never hear the end of this!

Enter PANDARUS

PANDARUS

How now, how now! how go maidenheads? Here, youmaid! where's my cousin Cressid?

PANDARUS

Well, well. What's the price of virgin? Hey, you there young girl! Where's my cousin Cressida?

CRESSIDA

Go hang yourself, you naughty mocking uncle!You bring me to do, and then you flout me too.

CRESSIDA

Go hang yourself, naughty mocking uncle! You go about making me do something, and then you laugh at me for it as well.

PANDARUS

To do what? to do what? let her saywhat: what have I brought you to do?

PANDARUS

Do what? Do what? Let her say what, what have I helped you do?

CRESSIDA

Come, come, beshrew your heart! you'll ne'er be good,Nor suffer others.

CRESSIDA

Oh behave, have some decency! You'll never live a good life, nor allow others to live good lives.

PANDARUS

Ha! ha! Alas, poor wretch! ah, poor capocchia! hast not slept to-night? would he not, a naughty man, let it sleep? a bugbear take him!

PANDARUS

Ha ha! Alas, poor wretch! Ah, poor thing. Haven't you slept last night? Would the naughty boy not let the thing sleep? Oh what a naughty man!

CRESSIDA

Did not I tell you? Would he were knock'd i' the head!

CRESSIDA

What did I say he would be like? I wish someone would knock him out.

Knocking within

CRESSIDA

Who's that at door? good uncle, go and see.My lord, come you again into my chamber:You smile and mock me, as if I meant naughtily.

CRESSIDA

Who's at the door? Good uncle, go and see. [To TROILUS] My lord, come back into my bedroom. Why are you smiling? Oh, not like that!

TROILUS

Ha, ha!

TROILUS

Haha.

CRESSIDA

Come, you are deceived, I think of no such thing.

CRESSIDA

Come on, you're wrong, I'm not thinking about that.

Knocking within

CRESSIDA

How earnestly they knock! Pray you, come in:I would not for half Troy have you seen here.

CRESSIDA

They are knocking so loudly! Please, come in. I don't want anyone to know you are here.

Exeunt TROILUS and CRESSIDA

PANDARUS

Who's there? what's the matter? will you beatdown the door? How now! what's the matter?

PANDARUS

Who's there? What's the matter? You're going to break the door down! What's the matter?

Enter AENEAS

AENEAS

Good morrow, lord, good morrow.

AENEAS

Good morning, lord, good morning.

PANDARUS

Who's there? my Lord AEneas! By my troth,I knew you not: what news with you so early?

PANDARUS

Who's there? My lord Aeneas! I honestly, didn't recognize you. What's wrong that means you come here so early in the day?

AENEAS

Is not Prince Troilus here?

AENEAS

Is Prince Troilus here?

PANDARUS

Here! what should he do here?

PANDARUS

Here? Why would he be here?

AENEAS

Come, he is here, my lord; do not deny him:It doth import him much to speak with me.

AENEAS

Look, he's obviously here, don't deny it. It's important he speaks to me.

PANDARUS

Is he here, say you? 'tis more than I know, I'llbe sworn: for my own part, I came in late. Whatshould he do here?

PANDARUS

You say he's here? Oh, well, I wouldn't know, honestly. I only came back recently. Why would he be here?

AENEAS

Who!—nay, then: come, come, you'll do him wrong ere you're ware: you'll be so true to him, to be false to him: do not you know of him, but yet go fetch him hither; go.

AENEAS

You mean "who" should he be doing here! No, come on then. You'll hurt him if you're not careful. You're covering for him, but betraying him. I don't care if you know he is here, go get him. Now.

Re-enter TROILUS

TROILUS

How now! what's the matter?

TROILUS

Hey, what's the matter?

AENEAS

My lord, I scarce have leisure to salute you, My matter is so rash: there is at hand Paris your brother, and Deiphobus, The Grecian Diomed, and our Antenor Deliver'd to us; and for him forthwith, Ere the first sacrifice, within this hour, We must give up to Diomedes' hand The Lady Cressida.

AENEAS

My lord, I hardly have time to say hello, my business is so important. Outside the house are your brother Paris, Deiphobus, the Greek Diomedes and the Trojan Antenor, who has been returned to us. And in return for Antenor, before we even go to prayer, right now, we must give up Lady Cressida to Diomedes.

TROILUS

Is it so concluded?

TROILUS

This has been decided?

AENEAS

By Priam and the general state of Troy:They are at hand and ready to effect it.

AENEAS

By Priam and the politicians of Troy, they are outside ready to make it happen.

TROILUS

How my achievements mock me!I will go meet them: and, my Lord AEneas,We met by chance; you did not find me here.

TROILUS

My success has turned to despair! I will go and meet them, my lord Aeneas, I'll pretend to have just been passing by, don't say you saw me here.

AENEAS

Good, good, my lord; the secrets of natureHave not more gift in taciturnity.

AENEAS

Yes, my lord. No one is more discrete than me.

Exeunt TROILUS and AENEAS

PANDARUS

Is't possible? no sooner got but lost? The devil take Antenor! the young prince will go mad: a plague upon Antenor! I would they had broke's neck!

PANDARUS

Is it possible? No sooner got than it is lost? I'd give Antenor to the devil! The young prince will go mad, I hope a plague takes Antenor! I wish the Greeks had broken his neck!

Re-enter CRESSIDA

CRESSIDA

How now! what's the matter? who was here?

CRESSIDA

Hey, what's the matter? Who was here?

PANDARUS

Ah, ah!

PANDARUS

Ah, ah!

CRESSIDA

Why sigh you so profoundly? where's my lord? gone!Tell me, sweet uncle, what's the matter?

CRESSIDA

Why are you sighing so deeply? Where's my lord? He's gone! Tell me, sweet uncle, what's the matter?

PANDARUS

Would I were as deep under the earth as I am above!

PANDARUS

I wish I were dead!

CRESSIDA

O the gods! what's the matter?

CRESSIDA

Oh gods! What's the matter!

PANDARUS

Prithee, get thee in: would thou hadst ne'er beenborn! I knew thou wouldst be his death. O, poorgentleman! A plague upon Antenor!

PANDARUS

I beg you, go inside, I wish you had never been born! I knew you'd be the thing that kills him. Oh, poor gentleman! A plague upon Antenor!

CRESSIDA

Good uncle, I beseech you, on my knees! beseech you,what's the matter?

CRESSIDA

Good uncle, I beg you, on my knees, I beg you, what's happened?

PANDARUS

Thou must be gone, wench, thou must be gone; thou art changed for Antenor: thou must to thy father, and be gone from Troilus: 'twill be his death; 'twill be his bane; he cannot bear it.

PANDARUS

You must go, girl, you must be gone, you are going to be traded in return for Antenor. You must go to your father and away from Troilus. It will be his death, his torture, the one thing he couldn't possibly bear.

CRESSIDA

O you immortal gods! I will not go.

CRESSIDA

Oh gods! I will not go.

PANDARUS

Thou must.

PANDARUS

You have to.

CRESSIDA

I will not, uncle: I have forgot my father; I know no touch of consanguinity; No kin no love, no blood, no soul so near me As the sweet Troilus. O you gods divine! Make Cressid's name the very crown of falsehood, If ever she leave Troilus! Time, force, and death, Do to this body what extremes you can; But the strong base and building of my love Is as the very centre of the earth, Drawing all things to it. I'll go in and weep,—

CRESSIDA

I will not, uncle. I have broken relations with my father, and don't recognize him as my family. He is not my relative, I feel no love for him, I am not of his blood, and there is no soul worth so much to me as that of Troilus. Oh divine gods! Make my name a common by-word for infidelity if I ever leave Troilus! Oh Time, Force, and Death: do whatever you can to me, my love for Troilus is stronger than the gravity that holds us on the earth. I'll go into my room to cry...

PANDARUS

Do, do.

PANDARUS

Do, do.

CRESSIDA

Tear my bright hair and scratch my praised cheeks,Crack my clear voice with sobs and break my heartWith sounding Troilus. I will not go from Troy.

CRESSIDA

I'll tear out my hair and scratch at my cheeks, scream until my throat hurts, and break my heart crying Troilus's name. I will not leave Troy.

Exeunt

Troilus and cressida
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Tom hill
About the Translator: Tom Hill

Tom Hill lives in his native London where he has just finished studying for an MA in Shakespeare Studies at King's College London and Shakespeare's Globe Theatre. He has worked in education both in the UK and in Asia. His favorite Shakespeare play is The Merchant of Venice.