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Troilus and Cressida

Troilus and Cressida Translation Act 4, Scene 5

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Enter AJAX, armed; AGAMEMNON, ACHILLES, PATROCLUS, MENELAUS, ULYSSES, NESTOR, and others

AGAMEMNON

Here art thou in appointment fresh and fair, Anticipating time with starting courage. Give with thy trumpet a loud note to Troy, Thou dreadful Ajax; that the appalled air May pierce the head of the great combatant And hale him hither.

AGAMEMNON

You are here fresh and ready, waiting bravely for the time to fight. Blow your trumpet loudly to give a message to Troy, terrifying Ajax, that the awful sound might assault his ears and bring him here.

AJAX

Thou, trumpet, there's my purse. Now crack thy lungs, and split thy brazen pipe: Blow, villain, till thy sphered bias cheek Outswell the colic of puff'd Aquilon: Come, stretch thy chest and let thy eyes spout blood; Thou blow'st for Hector.

AJAX

You, trumpeter, here is my money. Now blow as hard as you can. Blow, man, until you cheeks are more full of air than the entire sky. Now puff out your chest and play until your eyes cry blood. You are blowing to Hector.

Trumpet sounds

ULYSSES

No trumpet answers.

ULYSSES

There is no reply.

ACHILLES

'Tis but early days.

ACHILLES

It's not been long enough.

AGAMEMNON

Is not yond Diomed, with Calchas' daughter?

AGAMEMNON

Isn't that Diomedes with Calchas's daughter?

ULYSSES

'Tis he, I ken the manner of his gait;He rises on the toe: that spirit of hisIn aspiration lifts him from the earth.

ULYSSES

It is him, I recognize the way he walks. He has a spring in his step, and his spirit seems to lift him above the ground.

Enter DIOMEDES, with CRESSIDA

AGAMEMNON

Is this the Lady Cressid?

AGAMEMNON

Is this the lady Cressida?

DIOMEDES

Even she.

DIOMEDES

It is her.

AGAMEMNON

Most dearly welcome to the Greeks, sweet lady.

AGAMEMNON

Welcome to the Greek camp, sweet lady. [AGAMEMNON kisses CRESSIDA]

NESTOR

Our general doth salute you with a kiss.

NESTOR

Our general greets you with a kiss.

ULYSSES

Yet is the kindness but particular;'Twere better she were kiss'd in general.

ULYSSES

But this is just the kindness of one man, she should be kissed by everyone.

NESTOR

And very courtly counsel: I'll begin.So much for Nestor.

NESTOR

That's good advice, I'll begin. This is from Nestor. [NESTOR kisses CRESSIDA]

ACHILLES

I'll take what winter from your lips, fair lady:Achilles bids you welcome.

ACHILLES

I'll warm your lips, fair lady. Achilles welcomes you. [ACHILLES kisses CRESSIDA]

MENELAUS

I had good argument for kissing once.

MENELAUS

I used to have a good reason to kiss. 

PATROCLUS

But that's no argument for kissing now;For this popp'd Paris in his hardiment,And parted thus you and your argument.

PATROCLUS

But that's no reason for kissing now. Paris thrust himself in, with his boldness, and separated you from your reason. [PATROCLUS kisses CRESSIDA]

ULYSSES

O deadly gall, and theme of all our scorns!For which we lose our heads to gild his horns.

ULYSSES

Oh that terrible reason, the reason for all our suffering! The reason is why we lose our heads to decorate his horns.

PATROCLUS

The first was Menelaus' kiss; this, mine:Patroclus kisses you.

PATROCLUS

The first kiss I give you is from Menelaus. This one is your kiss from Patroclus. [PATROCLUS kisses CRESSIDA again]

MENELAUS

O, this is trim!

MENELAUS

Oh, good one.

PATROCLUS

Paris and I kiss evermore for him.

PATROCLUS

Paris and I do all his kissing for him.

MENELAUS

I'll have my kiss, sir. Lady, by your leave.

MENELAUS

I'll have my kiss, sir. Lady, if you don't mind.

CRESSIDA

In kissing, do you render or receive?

CRESSIDA

Do you give a kiss or take one?

PATROCLUS

Both take and give.

MENELAUS

A kiss is both taken and given.

CRESSIDA

I'll make my match to live,The kiss you take is better than you give;Therefore no kiss.

CRESSIDA

I bet my life that the kiss you take is better than the kiss you receive. Therefore I won't kiss you.

MENELAUS

I'll give you boot, I'll give you three for one.

MENELAUS

I'll give you a profit, I'll kiss you three times in return for one kiss from you.

CRESSIDA

You're an odd man; give even or give none.

CRESSIDA

You're an odd man. Give equally or don't give at all.

MENELAUS

An odd man, lady! every man is odd.

MENELAUS

An odd man? Lady, every man is just one person.

CRESSIDA

No, Paris is not; for you know 'tis true,That you are odd, and he is even with you.

CRESSIDA

No, Paris isn't, and you know that because of him you are alone and he has got even with you.

MENELAUS

You fillip me o' the head.

MENELAUS

That hurt.

CRESSIDA

No, I'll be sworn.

CRESSIDA

I don't think it was me that hurt your head.

ULYSSES

It were no match, your nail against his horn.May I, sweet lady, beg a kiss of you?

ULYSSES

It's no competition, your nails against his horn. May I, sweet lady, beg for a kiss from you?

CRESSIDA

You may.

CRESSIDA

You may.

ULYSSES

I do desire it.

ULYSSES

I wish to.

CRESSIDA

Why, beg, then.

CRESSIDA

Go on, then, beg.

ULYSSES

Why then for Venus' sake, give me a kiss,When Helen is a maid again, and his.

ULYSSES

Why then, for Venus's sake, give me a kiss when Helen is a virgin again and back with him.

CRESSIDA

I am your debtor, claim it when 'tis due.

CRESSIDA

I will honor that when what you say is true.

ULYSSES

Never's my day, and then a kiss of you.

ULYSSES

Then I'll never have a kiss from you.

DIOMEDES

Lady, a word: I'll bring you to your father.

DIOMEDES

Lady, may I talk with you. I will bring you to your father.

Exit with CRESSIDA

NESTOR

A woman of quick sense.

NESTOR

She's a quick-witted woman.

ULYSSES

Fie, fie upon her! There's language in her eye, her cheek, her lip, Nay, her foot speaks; her wanton spirits look out At every joint and motive of her body. O, these encounterers, so glib of tongue, That give accosting welcome ere it comes, And wide unclasp the tables of their thoughts To every ticklish reader! set them down For sluttish spoils of opportunity And daughters of the game.

ULYSSES

Bah, sod her! There's wit in her eyes, cheeks, lips, even her foot is witty. Her promiscuous spirits pour out of every joint and limb of her body. Oh, these confident women, so clever with their tongue, they show what they really want to anyone willing to take her up on it! Consider her either an easy prize to be won by anyone bold enough to try or a prostitute.

Trumpet within

ALL

The Trojans' trumpet.

ALL

The Trojans' trumpet.

AGAMEMNON

Yonder comes the troop.

AGAMEMNON

Here come their soldiers.

Enter HECTOR, armed; AENEAS, TROILUS, and other Trojans, with Attendants

AENEAS

Hail, all you state of Greece! what shall be done To him that victory commands? or do you purpose A victor shall be known? will you the knights Shall to the edge of all extremity Pursue each other, or shall be divided By any voice or order of the field? Hector bade ask.

AENEAS

Greetings to you, Greek rulers. How will the winner be rewarded? Or how do you intend that the victory be decided? Do you want the knights to fight to the death, or should they be stopped by a referee? Hector told me to ask you.

AGAMEMNON

Which way would Hector have it?

AGAMEMNON

What conditions does Hector want?

AENEAS

He cares not; he'll obey conditions.

AENEAS

He doesn't care, he'll obey any conditions.

ACHILLES

'Tis done like Hector; but securely done,A little proudly, and great deal misprizingThe knight opposed.

ACHILLES

This is how Hector speaks, confidently, a little proudly, and greatly underestimating his opponent.

AENEAS

If not Achilles, sir,What is your name?

AENEAS

Who are you, if you aren't Achilles?

ACHILLES

If not Achilles, nothing.

ACHILLES

If I'm not Achilles, I am nothing.

AENEAS

Therefore Achilles: but, whate'er, know this: In the extremity of great and little, Valour and pride excel themselves in Hector; The one almost as infinite as all, The other blank as nothing. Weigh him well, And that which looks like pride is courtesy. This Ajax is half made of Hector's blood: In love whereof, half Hector stays at home; Half heart, half hand, half Hector comes to seek This blended knight, half Trojan and half Greek.

AENEAS

Therefore Achilles, or whoever you are, listen: there is great braveness and little pride in Hector. The first is almost infinite, the other almost nothing. If you look at him you'll see that when he seems proud, he is actually being polite. Ajax is a relative of Hector, and so their blood is half the same. Because of this, half of Hector comes to fight. And with only half of his heart, and one of his hands, Hector comes to fight this half-Trojan, half-Greek knight.

ACHILLES

A maiden battle, then? O, I perceive you.

ACHILLES

This won't be a fight to the death then? I see.

Re-enter DIOMEDES

AGAMEMNON

Here is Sir Diomed. Go, gentle knight, Stand by our Ajax: as you and Lord AEneas Consent upon the order of their fight, So be it; either to the uttermost, Or else a breath: the combatants being kin Half stints their strife before their strokes begin.

AGAMEMNON

This is Sir Diomedes. Go, noble knight, and stand with Ajax. Whatever terms you and Lord Aeneas agree to shall be the rules for the battle. Let it be either to death or just a sporting fight, if the combatants are related they won't be able to hate each other fully.

AJAX and HECTOR enter the lists

ULYSSES

They are opposed already.

ULYSSES

They are already prepared to fight.

AGAMEMNON

What Trojan is that same that looks so heavy?

AGAMEMNON

Who is that Trojan who looks so sad?

ULYSSES

The youngest son of Priam, a true knight, Not yet mature, yet matchless, firm of word, Speaking in deeds and deedless in his tongue; Not soon provoked nor being provoked soon calm'd: His heart and hand both open and both free; For what he has he gives, what thinks he shows; Yet gives he not till judgment guide his bounty, Nor dignifies an impure thought with breath; Manly as Hector, but more dangerous; For Hector in his blaze of wrath subscribes To tender objects, but he in heat of action Is more vindicative than jealous love: They call him Troilus, and on him erect A second hope, as fairly built as Hector. Thus says AEneas; one that knows the youth Even to his inches, and with private soul Did in great Ilion thus translate him to me.

ULYSSES

The youngest son of king Priam, a good knight, not yet fully grown up, but still an unequaled knight: an honest man, who speaks with actions not words. It's hard to make him angry, and hard to calm him down when he is angry, but he is generous with both his love and his possessions. Whatever he has he shares, and whatever he thinks he shows, but only to people who he should be generous towards, and he would never be so dishonorable as to say anything inappropriate. He is as manly as Hector but more dangerous. For while Hector can be expected to show mercy even when he is angry, when he is in the heat of the fight, this knight is even more vengeful than a jealous lover. He is called Troilus, and the Trojans see him as a second hope, as well built as Hector. This is what Aeneas said to me in private when I visited Troy, and he knows the young man very well.

Alarum. Hector and Ajax fight

AGAMEMNON

They are in action.

AGAMEMNON

They are fighting.

NESTOR

Now, Ajax, hold thine own!

NESTOR

Come on Ajax, defend yourself.

TROILUS

Hector, thou sleep'st;Awake thee!

TROILUS

Hector you are fighting as if you're asleep, wake up!

AGAMEMNON

His blows are well disposed: there, Ajax!

AGAMEMNON

His attacks are well aimed, good shot, Ajax!

DIOMEDES

You must no more.

DIOMEDES

You must stop fighting.

Trumpets cease

AENEAS

Princes, enough, so please you.

AENEAS

Princes, please stop.

AJAX

I am not warm yet; let us fight again.

AJAX

I haven't even broken a sweat, let's fight again.

DIOMEDES

As Hector pleases.

DIOMEDES

If Hector is happy to continue...

HECTOR

Why, then will I no more: Thou art, great lord, my father's sister's son, A cousin-german to great Priam's seed; The obligation of our blood forbids A gory emulation 'twixt us twain: Were thy commixtion Greek and Trojan so That thou couldst say 'This hand is Grecian all, And this is Trojan; the sinews of this leg All Greek, and this all Troy; my mother's blood Runs on the dexter cheek, and this sinister Bounds in my father's;' by Jove multipotent, Thou shouldst not bear from me a Greekish member Wherein my sword had not impressure made Of our rank feud: but the just gods gainsay That any drop thou borrow'dst from thy mother, My sacred aunt, should by my mortal sword Be drain'd! Let me embrace thee, Ajax: By him that thunders, thou hast lusty arms; Hector would have them fall upon him thus: Cousin, all honour to thee!

HECTOR

Then I will stop here: you are, great lord, my father's sister's son, and the first cousin to all of Priam's sons. Because we are family we are not allowed to kill each other. If it were possible to separate your Greek and Trojan parts so that you could say: "This hand is all Greek, and this one is Trojan, the muscles in this leg are all Greek, and this one is Trojan, my Trojan mother's blood is in my right cheek, and the left cheek is made of my father's Greek blood," then, I swear by Jove, you would not leave this fight with a Greek limb on your body. But the gods forbid that I use my sword to spill any of your mother's, my sacred aunt's, blood! Let me embrace you, Ajax, by Jove, you have strong arms and I'd rather they embraced me than fought me. All honor to you, cousin!

AJAX

I thank thee, Hector Thou art too gentle and too free a man: I came to kill thee, cousin, and bear hence A great addition earned in thy death.

AJAX

Thank you Hector, you are too generous and gentle. I came to kill you, cousin, and gain honor from you dying.

HECTOR

Not Neoptolemus so mirable, On whose bright crest Fame with her loud'st Oyes Cries 'This is he,' could promise to himself A thought of added honour torn from Hector.

HECTOR

Not even the great Achilles, who Fame herself declares is her favourite, could expect to have that honor.

AENEAS

There is expectance here from both the sides,What further you will do.

AENEAS

Both sides wait for your answer about what you will do.

HECTOR

We'll answer it;The issue is embracement: Ajax, farewell.

HECTOR

We'll give you this answer: the outcome of this fight is an embrace. Ajax, goodbye.

AJAX

If I might in entreaties find success— As seld I have the chance— I would desire My famous cousin to our Grecian tents.

AJAX

Maybe I can have more success with my words, something I rarely get a chance to do. I invite my famous cousin to the Greek camp.

DIOMEDES

'Tis Agamemnon's wish, and great AchillesDoth long to see unarm'd the valiant Hector.

DIOMEDES

It is Agamemnon's wish, and great Achilles wants to see the valiant Hector without his weapons.

HECTOR

AEneas, call my brother Troilus to me, And signify this loving interview To the expecters of our Trojan part; Desire them home. Give me thy hand, my cousin; I will go eat with thee and see your knights.

HECTOR

Aeneas, go bring Troilus to me, and tell the Trojans who expect me to come back that I am going to meet the Greeks and that they may go home. Give me your hand, cousin, I will eat with you and meet your knights.

AJAX

Great Agamemnon comes to meet us here.

AJAX

Great Agamemnon is coming to meet us here.

HECTOR

The worthiest of them tell me name by name; But for Achilles, mine own searching eyes Shall find him by his large and portly size.

HECTOR

Tell me the names of the most important people. Except for Achilles, I'll recognize him from his large build.

AGAMEMNON

Worthy of arms! as welcome as to one That would be rid of such an enemy; But that's no welcome: understand more clear, What's past and what's to come is strew'd with husks And formless ruin of oblivion; But in this extant moment, faith and troth, Strain'd purely from all hollow bias-drawing, Bids thee, with most divine integrity, From heart of very heart, great Hector, welcome.

AGAMEMNON

Brave fighters! You are welcome here, even though we would be glad to be rid of such an enemy. But that's no welcome. Understand me clearly, our past and future are full of skeletons and total destruction. But this moment allows you to be welcomed, great Hector, honestly and faithfully, free of any prejudice, with the most divine fair dealing.

HECTOR

I thank thee, most imperious Agamemnon.

HECTOR

Thank you, imperial Agamemnon.

AGAMEMNON

[To TROILUS] My well-famed lord of Troy, noless to you.

AGAMEMNON

[To TROILUS] I welcome you as well, famous Trojan lord.

MENELAUS

Let me confirm my princely brother's greeting:You brace of warlike brothers, welcome hither.

MENELAUS

I'd like to welcome you as well, warrior brothers, you are welcome here.

HECTOR

Who must we answer?

HECTOR

Who are you, may I ask?

AENEAS

The noble Menelaus.

AENEAS

The noble Menelaus.

HECTOR

O, you, my lord? by Mars his gauntlet, thanks! Mock not, that I affect the untraded oath; Your quondam wife swears still by Venus' glove: She's well, but bade me not commend her to you.

HECTOR

Oh it's you? Many thanks, by Mars! Don't be upset that I don't pass on best wishes from your ex-wife, but she told me not to.

MENELAUS

Name her not now, sir; she's a deadly theme.

MENELAUS

Let's not talk about her now, sir, she's a bad topic.

HECTOR

O, pardon; I offend.

HECTOR

Oh, excuse me. I'm offending you.

NESTOR

I have, thou gallant Trojan, seen thee oft Labouring for destiny make cruel way Through ranks of Greekish youth, and I have seen thee, As hot as Perseus, spur thy Phrygian steed, Despising many forfeits and subduements, When thou hast hung thy advanced sword i' the air, Not letting it decline on the declined, That I have said to some my standers by 'Lo, Jupiter is yonder, dealing life!' And I have seen thee pause and take thy breath, When that a ring of Greeks have hemm'd thee in, Like an Olympian wrestling: this have I seen; But this thy countenance, still lock'd in steel, I never saw till now. I knew thy grandsire, And once fought with him: he was a soldier good; But, by great Mars, the captain of us all, Never saw like thee. Let an old man embrace thee; And, worthy warrior, welcome to our tents.

NESTOR

I have, gallant Trojan, often seen you doing Death's job and cruelly cutting a path through ranks of young Greek soldiers, and I have seen you, as hot as Perseus, riding your warhorse showing your scorn for those soldiers who beg for mercy, holding your sword in the air rather than letting it fall on the fallen. And I have said to some other observers: "Look, Jupiter himself has come, deciding who should live and who should die!" And I have seen you pause and catch your breath, when you have been surrounded by a ring of Greek soldiers, like a wrestler entering the ring. This I have seen but until now I never saw your face without a helmet on. I knew your grandfather, and once fought with him. He was a good soldier, but by Mars, the captain of us all, I never saw anyone like you before. Let an old man embrace you, and welcome you to our tents, worthy warrior.

AENEAS

'Tis the old Nestor.

AENEAS

This is old Nestor.

HECTOR

Let me embrace thee, good old chronicle,That hast so long walk'd hand in hand with time:Most reverend Nestor, I am glad to clasp thee.

HECTOR

Let me embrace you, wise old story-teller, that has lived a very long life. Respect-worthy Nestor, I am glad to hold you in my arms.

NESTOR

I would my arms could match thee in contention,As they contend with thee in courtesy.

NESTOR

I wish my arms were as strong as yours, I cannot hold you so tightly.

HECTOR

I would they could.

HECTOR

I wish they could.

NESTOR

Ha!By this white beard, I'ld fight with thee to-morrow.Well, welcome, welcome! I have seen the time.

NESTOR

Ha! By my white beard, I would fight with you tomorrow if I could. Well, welcome, welcome! I cannot believe I have lived to see this.

ULYSSES

I wonder now how yonder city standsWhen we have here her base and pillar by us.

ULYSSES

I wonder how Troy is still standing without you standing there to hold her up.

HECTOR

I know your favour, Lord Ulysses, well. Ah, sir, there's many a Greek and Trojan dead, Since first I saw yourself and Diomed In Ilion, on your Greekish embassy.

HECTOR

I know your face well, Lord Ulysses. Ah, sir, many Greeks and Trojans have died since I last saw you and Diomedes in Troy as ambassadors.

ULYSSES

Sir, I foretold you then what would ensue: My prophecy is but half his journey yet; For yonder walls, that pertly front your town, Yond towers, whose wanton tops do buss the clouds, Must kiss their own feet.

ULYSSES

Sir I told you then what would happen. My prophecy has only been half fulfilled, though. For those walls over there, that hold up your town so shamelessly, and those towers, which so lustfully kiss the clouds, will kiss their own feet when they fall.

HECTOR

I must not believe you: There they stand yet, and modestly I think, The fall of every Phrygian stone will cost A drop of Grecian blood: the end crowns all, And that old common arbitrator, Time, Will one day end it.

HECTOR

I can't believe your visions will come true. Troy's walls are still standing, and they look modest to me. Every stone that falls from our walls will cost a drop of Greek blood. The end is the conclusion of everything, and time will be the judge of everyone.

ULYSSES

So to him we leave it. Most gentle and most valiant Hector, welcome: After the general, I beseech you next To feast with me and see me at my tent.

ULYSSES

Then we will leave it to him. Most gentle and valiant Hector, welcome. After you have visited the general, I ask that you will come and eat with me at my tent.

ACHILLES

I shall forestall thee, Lord Ulysses, thou! Now, Hector, I have fed mine eyes on thee; I have with exact view perused thee, Hector, And quoted joint by joint.

ACHILLES

I shall interrupt you there, lord Ulysses! Now, Hector, I have feasted my eyes on you. I have seen you very well indeed, Hector, and considered every joint.

HECTOR

Is this Achilles?

HECTOR

Is this Achilles?

ACHILLES

I am Achilles.

ACHILLES

I am Achilles.

HECTOR

Stand fair, I pray thee: let me look on thee.

HECTOR

Stand still, please. Let me look at you.

ACHILLES

Behold thy fill.

ACHILLES

Take your fill of looking.

HECTOR

Nay, I have done already.

HECTOR

No, I am already done.

ACHILLES

Thou art too brief: I will the second time,As I would buy thee, view thee limb by limb.

ACHILLES

You are too quick. I'd like to see you a second time, so that I will know what to do with you.

HECTOR

O, like a book of sport thou'lt read me o'er; But there's more in me than thou understand'st. Why dost thou so oppress me with thine eye?

HECTOR

Oh, you'll read me like a hunting book will you? There's more inside me than you understand. Why are you glaring at me like this?

ACHILLES

Tell me, you heavens, in which part of his body Shall I destroy him? whether there, or there, or there? That I may give the local wound a name And make distinct the very breach whereout Hector's great spirit flew: answer me, heavens!

ACHILLES

Tell me, heavens, how I should destroy him? Should I attack there, or there, or there? I need to know so that I may name the place where I wound him, and can know the breach out of which Hector's great spirit flew. Answer me, heavens!

HECTOR

It would discredit the blest gods, proud man, To answer such a question: stand again: Think'st thou to catch my life so pleasantly As to prenominate in nice conjecture Where thou wilt hit me dead?

HECTOR

It would be dishonorable for the blessed gods to answer, proud man. Stand up again. You think it will be so easy to speculate in advance where you will strike me dead?

ACHILLES

I tell thee, yea.

ACHILLES

I think so, yes.

HECTOR

Wert thou an oracle to tell me so, I'd not believe thee. Henceforth guard thee well; For I'll not kill thee there, nor there, nor there; But, by the forge that stithied Mars his helm, I'll kill thee every where, yea, o'er and o'er. You wisest Grecians, pardon me this brag; His insolence draws folly from my lips; But I'll endeavour deeds to match these words, Or may I never—

HECTOR

If you were an oracle and thought so, I would not believe you. From now on protect yourself well. For I won't kill you there, nor there, nor there. But, I swear by Mars, I'll kill you everywhere, yes, over and over again. Wise Greeks, forgive me for boasting like this, I'll make sure I carry out what I have said or I'll never...

AJAX

Do not chafe thee, cousin: And you, Achilles, let these threats alone, Till accident or purpose bring you to't: You may have every day enough of Hector If you have stomach; the general state, I fear, Can scarce entreat you to be odd with him.

AJAX

Don't get angry cousin. And you, Achilles, stop making threats, until by accident or intention you may do it. You can spend every day fighting Hector as much you want, if you have the stomach for it. The generals, I suspect, cannot encourage you enough to triumph over him.

HECTOR

I pray you, let us see you in the field:We have had pelting wars, since you refusedThe Grecians' cause.

HECTOR

I beg you, come find me on the battlefield. We've been play-fighting since you stopped fighting.

ACHILLES

Dost thou entreat me, Hector?To-morrow do I meet thee, fell as death;To-night all friends.

ACHILLES

Are you asking me to do that for you, Hector? Tomorrow I will find you, as terrifying as death. Tonight we are friends.

HECTOR

Thy hand upon that match.

HECTOR

I'll shake to that.

AGAMEMNON

First, all you peers of Greece, go to my tent; There in the full convive we: afterwards, As Hector's leisure and your bounties shall Concur together, severally entreat him. Beat loud the tabourines, let the trumpets blow, That this great soldier may his welcome know.

AGAMEMNON

First, all of you brave men, go to my tent. There we shall feast together, and afterwards you can all meet Hector when you want. Beat the tambourines, play the trumpets, so that this great soldier knows how welcome he is.

Exeunt all except TROILUS and ULYSSES

TROILUS

My Lord Ulysses, tell me, I beseech you,In what place of the field doth Calchas keep?

TROILUS

Lord Ulysses, please tell me where Calchas is staying?

ULYSSES

At Menelaus' tent, most princely Troilus: There Diomed doth feast with him to-night; Who neither looks upon the heaven nor earth, But gives all gaze and bent of amorous view On the fair Cressid.

ULYSSES

He is in Menelaus's tent, Prince Troilus. Diomedes is feasting with him there tonight. He is unable to look up or down, but only has loving eyes for the fair Cressida.

TROILUS

Shall sweet lord, be bound to you so much,After we part from Agamemnon's tent,To bring me thither?

TROILUS

Would you be so kind as to take me there after we leave Agamemnon's tent?

ULYSSES

You shall command me, sir. As gentle tell me, of what honour was This Cressida in Troy? Had she no lover there That wails her absence?

ULYSSES

If you wish, sir. Would you mind telling me what Cressida's reputation was like when she was in Troy. Did she not have a lover there who misses her?

TROILUS

O, sir, to such as boasting show their scars A mock is due. Will you walk on, my lord? She was beloved, she loved; she is, and doth: But still sweet love is food for fortune's tooth.

TROILUS

Oh, sir, those who boast by showing their scars deserve to be mocked. Will you go ahead, lord? [To himself.] She was beloved, she used to love. She is loved, and she loves. But sweet love is the food of fortune.

Exeunt

Troilus and cressida
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Tom hill
About the Translator: Tom Hill

Tom Hill lives in his native London where he has just finished studying for an MA in Shakespeare Studies at King's College London and Shakespeare's Globe Theatre. He has worked in education both in the UK and in Asia. His favorite Shakespeare play is The Merchant of Venice.