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Twelfth Night

Twelfth Night Translation Act 2, Scene 2

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Enter VIOLA, MALVOLIO following

MALVOLIO

Were not you even now with the Countess Olivia?

MALVOLIO

Weren't you with the Countess Olivia just now?

VIOLA

Even now, sir. On a moderate pace I have since arrived but hither.

VIOLA

Yes, just now, sir. I've only made it this far, walking at a moderate pace.

MALVOLIO

She returns this ring to you, sir. You might have savedme my pains to have taken it away yourself. She adds, moreover, that you should put your lord into a desperateassurance she will none of him. And one thing more, that you be never so hardy to come again in his affairs,unless it be to report your lord’s taking of this. Receive it so.

MALVOLIO

She returns this ring to you, sir. You might have saved me the trouble and taken it with you. She also adds that you should make it clear to your lord that there is no hope—she wants nothing to do with him. And one thing more: you should never return here as Orsino's messenger again, unless it is to report how he takes the bad news. Take the ring now.

VIOLA

She took the ring of me. I’ll none of it.

VIOLA

She took that ring from me. I don't want it.

MALVOLIO

Come, sir, you peevishly threw it to her, and her will is it should be so returned. [he throws down the ring] If it be worth stooping for, there it lies in your eye. If not, be it his that finds it.

MALVOLIO

Come, sir, you rudely threw it to her, and she wants it to be returned just as rudely. [he throws down the ring] If it's worth stooping to pick up, there it is where you can see it. If not, let whoever finds it first have it.

Exit

VIOLA

I left no ring with her. What means this lady? Fortune forbid my outside have not charmed her! She made good view of me, indeed so much That sure methought her eyes had lost her tongue, For she did speak in starts distractedly. She loves me, sure! The cunning of her passion Invites me in this churlish messenger. None of my lord’s ring? Why, he sent her none. I am the man. If it be so, as ’tis, Poor lady, she were better love a dream. Disguise, I see thou art a wickedness, Wherein the pregnant enemy does much. How easy is it for the proper false In women’s waxen hearts to set their forms! Alas, our frailty is the cause, not we, For such as we are made of, such we be. How will this fadge? My master loves her dearly, And I, poor monster, fond as much on him, And she, mistaken, seems to dote on me. What will become of this? As I am man, My state is desperate for my master’s love. As I am woman, now, alas the day, What thriftless sighs shall poor Olivia breathe! O time, thou must untangle this, not I. It is too hard a knot for me to untie!

VIOLA

I didn't leave any ring with her. What does this lady mean by this? God forbid that she's smitten by my appearance! She did look intently at me, indeed so much that I thought her eyes had caused her to lose her tongue, for she spoke wildly and distractedly. I think she loves me! She is crafty in her passion, and has used this rude messenger to subtly invite me back. So she doesn't want my lord's ring? Well, he never sent her one. I am the man she wants. If this is true, which it is, then the poor lady would be better off loving a dream. I now see that disguises are a tool to aid the resourceful devil. How easy it is for attractive, deceitful men to mold women's hearts to their will! Alas, it's our female frailty that's to blame—we can't help it. We turn out the way we're made. But how will all this play out? My master loves her dearly, and I, poor androgynous fool, love him just as much. And now she, mistaking me for a man, seems to have fallen in love with me. What will become of all this? In my disguise as a man, I have no hope of winning Orsino's love, but as I am really a woman, Olivia's love for me is hopeless too! Oh time, you must untangle this mess—I can't do it myself. It is too hard a knot for me to untie!

Exit

Twelfth night
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Matt cosby
About the Translator: Matt Cosby
Matt Cosby graduated from Amherst College in 2011, and currently works as a writer and editor for LitCharts. He is from Florida but now lives in Portland, Oregon, where he also makes art, plays the piano, and goes to dog parks.