A Thousand Acres

A Thousand Acres

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Rose Cook Lewis Character Analysis

The daughter of Larry Cook, and wife of Pete Lewis. Like her sister, Ginny Cook Smith, Rose is an ambitious, often greedy woman, but Rose is more open about her feelings than Ginny is. While she loves Ginny and Caroline, and often looked out for Caroline over the years, her defining emotion is hatred for her father. Rose remembers that Larry would abuse her when she was a teenager; she’d often encourage him to have sex with her in order to protect Caroline, her little sister. Over the course of the novel, Rose gradually gives in to her desire to get revenge on Larry. At the same time, Rose must contend with breast cancer, which eventually ends her life. She’s driven apart from Ginny over her love for Jess Clark, and by the end of the novel she’s permanently estranged from the rest of her family. Rose corresponds to the character Regan in King Lear.

Rose Cook Lewis Quotes in A Thousand Acres

The A Thousand Acres quotes below are all either spoken by Rose Cook Lewis or refer to Rose Cook Lewis . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
King Lear and Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Anchor Books edition of A Thousand Acres published in 2003.
Book 1, Chapter 6 Quotes

We’ll stop making allowances tomorrow. This is important. He’s handing over his whole life, don’t you understand that? We have to receive it in the right spirit. And Rose and Pete and even Ty are ready to receive it. Just do it this once. Last time, I promise.

Related Characters: Ginny Cook Smith (speaker), Rose Cook Lewis , Caroline Cook , Laurence Cook , Tyler “Ty” Smith , Pete Lewis
Page Number: 34
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Ginny tries to convince her sister, Caroline, to go along with Larry’s plan to divide up his property between his three daughters. Previously, Caroline has been the only daughter to question her father’s sudden decision. Larry is getting older, he drinks a lot, and there are legitimate reasons to believe that he’s not in the right state of mind to voluntarily give up his own land and money. And yet Ginny and Rose go along with Larry’s decision—they want his property, even if they don’t admit it. Caroline, who, Ginny notes, has always loved Larry most dearly, is the only one to question Larry’s decision: an act that, on the surface of things, might seem disobedient, but is actually a sign of respect. It’s also important to note that Caroline is more financially independent than either of her siblings (she’s a lawyer) and less closely tied to her father’s farmland (unlike her siblings, she lives in Des Moines). It’s easier for Caroline to speak about the farmland frankly, because she’s not as biased by financial motives or by an emotional connection to the land.

The passage also implies some of Ginny’s latent guilt at accepting her father’s property so eagerly: she wants Caroline to accept her father’s generosity because of her own guilty conscience. Ginny tries to trick Caroline into accepting the money out of a sense of duty to her father—when in reality (as Caroline seems to know), the truly “dutiful” thing to do is probably to turn down the property altogether, or at least advise Larry to wait before making a rash decision.

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Book 2, Chapter 9 Quotes

I have this recurring nightmare about grabbing things that might hurt me, like that straight razor Daddy used to have, or a jar of some poison that spills on my hands. I know I shouldn’t and I watch myself, but I can’t resist.

Related Characters: Rose Cook Lewis (speaker), Ginny Cook Smith , Laurence Cook
Related Symbols: The Jar of Sausages
Page Number: 62
Explanation and Analysis:

Rose differs from her sister in many important ways; one of these is her acquisitiveness. Rose has no illusions about her personality: she was always a greedy person, even when she was a young child (or dreaming, as here). Whenever she saw something she liked, she had to have it immediately—even if the item in question was bad for her. Rose knows perfectly well that her greediness is a flaw: she recognizes that sometimes, she desires things that are bad for her; hence her nightmare about grabbing razor blades and poison. And yet Rose is powerless to change who she is.

The passage is important because it foreshadows the events of the rest of the novel. Rose will soon be seduced by her own wealth and power, to the point where she’ll be “chained” to her own farmland, even though she knows that it’s bad for her soul. (Also notice the subtle foreshadowing: Rose mentions a “poisoned jar’ much like the one Ginny will later use in an attempt to kill her.)

Book 2, Chapter 12 Quotes

“He is crazy,” said Rose. Anyway, Ginny, you’re running out of money

and you have all the expensive rentals left before you get to Go.”

Related Characters: Rose Cook Lewis (speaker), Ginny Cook Smith
Related Symbols: Monopoly
Page Number: 82
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Smiley uses the symbol of Monopoly to signal her characters’ latent greed and selfishness. The characters are playing a friendly game of Monopoly, but they’re also talking about Larry, who continues to spend money on elaborate house purchases, like cabinets and countertops. Rose moves the discussion from Larry to Monopoly, but because of the syntax of the paragraph, we think that she’s talking about real life when she says, “You’re running out of money.”

Smiley’s point is that, even if they won’t say so explicitly, Rose and Ginny are afraid that Larry is going to spend all their money before he dies. Now that Rose and Ginny are in power, they don’t like the idea of their father wasting his (and their) cash on things he doesn’t need. Smiley never comes right out and says that Rose and Ginny are greedy for land and cash—one has to read between the lines to see that they are, and this passage is a great example of how Smiley uses subtle hints (and the façade of a game) to alert readers to the truth.

Book 2, Chapter 16 Quotes

After you’ve confided long enough in someone, he or she assumes the antagonism you might have just been trying out. It was better for now to keep this conversation to myself.

Related Characters: Ginny Cook Smith (speaker), Rose Cook Lewis
Page Number: 119
Explanation and Analysis:

In this strange passage, Ginny has just had a long, angry conversation with her sister, Caroline, in which Caroline accuses Ginny or dong a bad job of taking care of her father. Caroline suggests that Ginny and Rose are ungrateful children; in spite of everything their father has done for them, they treat him like an annoyance, to be tended to from time to time without any affection or compassion. Although Ginny denies that Caroline has a point, she declines to tell Rose about the conversation. Her stated reason for doing so is fascinating: essentially, she says that when somebody accuses you of being evil, you’ll eventually become evil. This fits with the novel’s complicated ideas about appearances and reality: sometimes appearances are a mask or diversion from reality, but sometimes one’s reality actually shifts to fit appearances.

The passage is especially ambiguous because it’s not clear if Ginny really is innocent of any maliciousness toward her father, or if, deep down, she senses that Caroline is right. If the former possibility is the case, the quote might suggest that Ginny and Rose aren’t really “villainous” at all at this point; they’re driven to mistreat their father because their father hates them and thinks of them as “whores.” If the latter possibility is true, then Ginny refuses to tell Rose about the conversation because she senses that Caroline is telling the truth.

Book 3, Chapter 19 Quotes

She wore a cast for eight weeks, and she made a sleeve for it with the words PETE DID THIS, glued on it in felt letters.

Related Characters: Ginny Cook Smith (speaker), Rose Cook Lewis , Pete Lewis
Page Number: 141
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, we learn that Pete Lewis beat his wife, Rose, until he eventually he broke her arm. Rose was so furious about Pete’s actions that when she wore a cast, she wrote, “Pete did this” on it. The cast acted as a reminder to everybody in the community that Pete wasn’t the good, easygoing man he pretended to be: Rose refused to give Pete the luxury of hiding from his crimes.

As we’ll eventually learn, though, Rose’s actions have a deeper meaning. Rose advertises Pete’s abuse because she refuses to let someone else get away with mistreating her, after Larry. Larry raped Rose repeatedly when she was a teenager, and Rose has been living with the trauma for decades. She refuses to let anyone take advantage of her ever again—hence the sleeve on the cast. Rose’s willingness to publicize Pete’s abusiveness contrasts with her reluctance to tell anyone about her father’s actions. In part, the difference is that, in the case of Larry’s abuse, there is no “this”—in other words, there is no physical mark that Rose can point to as a sign of her father’s cruelty. (See quotes from Chapter 24 for more on Rose’s reaction to Larry’s abuse.)

Book 3, Chapter 23 Quotes

I flattered you when I called you a bitch! What do you want to reduce me to? I’ll stop this building! I’ll get the land back! I’ll throw you whores off this place. You’ll learn what it means to treat your father like this. I curse you!

Related Characters: Laurence Cook (speaker), Ginny Cook Smith , Rose Cook Lewis
Page Number: 183
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, a direct homage to King Lear, Larry Cook accosts his two eldest daughters in the middle of a wild storm. Larry is furious that his daughters have mistreated him and disrespected him. It’s hard to say exactly what Larry’s children have done to offend him, however; they take care of him and invite him to spend more time with them. And yet, by Ginny’s own admission, the Cook daughters have also taken some pleasure in belittling their father—treating him like a child—and perhaps Larry is reacting to his children’s barely-concealed (and, in light of his abuse and rape, justified) contempt. Moreover, Larry is angry with himself for rejecting Caroline, and he takes out his frustration on Rose and Ginny.

As a result, Larry yells at Rose and Ginny, accusing them of being bad daughters and bad people. He even claims that he should never have given up his land, and that he’s going to try to get it back. The passage reiterates what an important part of Larry’s identity his land was: now that Larry has signed away his property, he’s “naked,” stripped of his identity and power. (Notice also that Larry calls his daughters “bitches” and “whores,” both exposing his deep sexism and foreshadowing the events of the next few chapters.)

Book 3, Chapter 24 Quotes

“He didn’t rape me, Ginny. He seduced me. He said it was okay, that it was good to please me, that he needed it, that I was special. He said he loved me.”
I said, “I can’t listen to this.”

Related Characters: Ginny Cook Smith (speaker), Rose Cook Lewis (speaker), Laurence Cook
Page Number: 190
Explanation and Analysis:

In this horrifying passage, Rose confesses that Larry had sex with her when she was only a teenager. Curiously, Rose refuses to admit that Larry raped her—even thought it’s pretty clear that, for all intents and purposes, he did. The way Rose puts it, she was “seduced” by Larry—suggesting that, on some level, she feels responsible for her own father’s incestuous crimes (“raped” would suggest that Rose had no control in the matter; “seduced” would suggest that on some level she chose to have sex with Larry).

The passage is a good example of the irrational guilt that survivors of rape and incest often feel: they believe that they themselves are responsible for their own abuse. Rose’s explanation is not logical; she was a child, and can hardly be blamed for not fighting back against her intimidating, frightening father. But her guilt explains why she’s wrestled with her traumatic memories for so long. Also notice that Ginny refuses to listen to the truth about her father; she’s in denial about Rose’s mistreatment because she’s also in denial of her own.

“He won’t get away with it, Ginny. I won’t let him get away with it. I just won’t.”

Related Characters: Rose Cook Lewis (speaker), Ginny Cook Smith , Laurence Cook
Page Number: 192
Explanation and Analysis:

One question hangs over the second half of the novel: why doesn’t Rose go to the police or make Larry’s crimes public? Why can’t she just tell the authorities and townspeople that her father is a criminal, an incestuous rapist? What we gather, based on this chapter, is that Rose feels partly responsible for her own rape—an irrational, but all-too common response among traumatized rape victims. Furthermore, there’s no indication that anybody would believe Rose if she said that Larry raped her years ago (as is often the case in situations like this, unfortunately). Finally, as the quote suggests, Rose would never be satisfied with merely a legal punishment for her father: she wants to destroy her father completely, expunging her own sense of guilt in the process.

The only way for Rose to totally destroy her father, Smiley implies, is to control everything he owns, including the farm. Rose’s plan is to humiliate her father until the day he dies: reshaping his farmland into a hog farm, and never showing compassion or love of any kind for him. By asserting her ownership of the farmland, Rose hopes to purge all memory of Larry from her surroundings, and therefore from her own mind. The problem, however, is that such an obsession with revenge usually leads to more pain and corruption for the person seeking vengeance than punishment for the original offender.

Book 3, Chapter 28 Quotes

It was incredible to hear Rose speak like this, but it was intoxicating, too, as sweet and forbidden as anything I had ever done.

Related Characters: Ginny Cook Smith (speaker), Rose Cook Lewis
Page Number: 216
Explanation and Analysis:

As the novel goes on, Rose and Ginny become more overtly villainous, confirming, perhaps, Ginny’s observation that she has a habit of taking on the antagonism people attribute to her. At the church potluck, Rose confides to Ginny that she wants to humiliate Larry—show him how far he’s fallen from his former glory and prestige. Ginny, who’s always thought of herself as a kind, loyal daughter, is a little shocked by Rose’s cruelty. But as she says here, she’s also “intoxicated,” knowing that Larry deserves whatever humiliation and punishment he might receive because of his past crimes, and relishing the shift in the family’s power dynamic.

The passage, at the simplest level, is about evil and how evil perpetuates itself. Ginny might not be an “evil” person, but she finds herself seduced by evil in trying to punish her father’s evil. While Regan and Goneril, the counterparts to Rose and Ginny in King Lear, are presented as more overtly and unambiguously villainous, Smiley wants to treat Rose and Ginny’s seemingly “wicked” actions with more nuance, particularly by identifying their source (Larry’s past abuse). Rose and Ginny both commit some horrible crimes of their own during the novel, but at the same time, they are the victims of their monstrous father; they’re trying to escape the traumatic past, but are trapped in a cycle of suffering and vengeance.

Since then I’ve often thought we could have taken our own advice, driven to the Twin Cities and found jobs as waitresses, measured out our days together in a garden apartment, the girls in one bedroom, Rose and I in the other, anonymous, ducking forever a destiny that we never asked for, that was our father’s gift to us.

Related Characters: Ginny Cook Smith (speaker), Rose Cook Lewis , Laurence Cook , Pamela , Linda
Page Number: 220
Explanation and Analysis:

Here Ginny expresses her desire to escape from the farmland where she’s spent most of her life and go to the Twin Cities (Minneapolis and Saint Paul). Ginny recognizes that she’ll never be entirely happy on the farm: there are too many bad memories. The farmland itself is a symbol of her family and her family’s legacy (the tiles themselves were laid by Larry’s ancestors), so Ginny can’t live on the farm and also forget about Larry and Larry’s crimes. As long as she accepts his property, she has to accept his influence and her memories of him. The alternative to accepting Larry’s influence is to “escape” the influence of Larry’s property by moving to a city. This is why the thousand acres is both a blessing and a curse to the Cook daughters.

But even if working as a waitress in the city would be a welcome release from Larry’s overbearing, intimidating presence, Ginny isn’t strong enough to leave (yet). She wants her father’s land and money, and she feels a legitimate family connection to the land. (She also feels she deserves it, and wants to get back at Larry by taking his power and wealth.) Like Rose in her nightmares, Ginny feels drawn to the things that slowly kill her.

Book 5, Chapter 40 Quotes

I continued to behave as if I was living in the sight of all our neighbors, as Mr. Cartier had told us to. I waited for Rose to die, but the weather was warm for sauerkraut and liver sausage—that was a winter dish.

Related Characters: Ginny Cook Smith (speaker), Rose Cook Lewis , Jean Cartier
Related Symbols: The Jar of Sausages
Page Number: 316
Explanation and Analysis:

The strength, but also the weakness, of Ginny’s murder plot is that it’s slow-acting and relies heavily on chance. As a result, it’s less likely that Ginny will be linked to the murder—but until Rose dies, Ginny has to twiddle her thumbs and wait. Moreover, until that time, Ginny can’t focus on anything but the murder. There’s a constant cloud of vengeance hanging over her—her life is “stalled” until the day that Rose dies.

Ginny’s murder plot is intended to free Ginny from her anxieties about life on the farmland: by killing Rose, she can (she assumes) run off with Jess and escape Larry forever. But because the sausages don’t kill Rose right away, Ginny can’t live normally; she’s always looking over her shoulder and putting on appearances of normality (as her lawyer told her to, mentioned here). As we’ll see soon enough, Ginny will spend the next decade and more with the burden of Rose’s potential murder.

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Rose Cook Lewis Character Timeline in A Thousand Acres

The timeline below shows where the character Rose Cook Lewis appears in A Thousand Acres. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book 1, Chapter 1
Women, Sexual Abuse, and Fertility Theme Icon
Inheritance, Land, and Memory Theme Icon
...Ericson family had two daughters, about the narrator’s age. The narrator also has a sister, Rose. Her other neighbors are the Clarks, who have two sons, Loren and Jess. The narrator’s... (full context)
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As a young child, the narrator and Rose used to take rides with their father in his new car. These rides stopped abruptly... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 2
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On Valentine’s Day (a few weeks before the narrator’s meeting with Loren), Rose is diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 34. As a result, the narrator... (full context)
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In the fall of 1978, Rose decides to send her two children, Pammy and Linda, to a boarding school. Pammy and... (full context)
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Jess greets Rose and the narrator and gives them both a hug. As they chat, they see a... (full context)
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...very well mannered. He gets along well with Ginny’s father, in contrast to Pete Lewis, Rose’s husband, who often quarrels with Ginny’s father. (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 4
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Ginny comes to Harold Clark’s house, where she finds Rose, Caroline, and Larry. Larry is explaining his plan to form a corporation, in which Ginny... (full context)
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...As Ginny witnesses this exchange, she realizes a crucial difference between Caroline and herself and Rose: Ginny and Rose are always careful to speak to their father as daughters, never as... (full context)
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...a diaphragm, and went about trying to get pregnant without telling Tyler. Ginny has told Rose about her secret, and Rose has sworn not to tell anyone. Ginny enjoys keeping a... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 5
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Ginny thinks back to Rose’s decision to marry Pete. Ginny was impressed with Pete, since Pete was handsome and charming,... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 6
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...into giving up his property in order to get rich quick. Caroline walks off with Rose and Pete, who drive her away from the church. As Ginny watches her sisters drive... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 7
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...car pulls up, carrying Marv Carson and Ken LaSalle (Larry’s lawyer and friend). Pete and Rose arrive, and soon there are lots of people inside the house, talking happily. Ginny sees... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 8
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After the corporation is established, Ginny and Rose take turns having Larry over for dinner. For months, Larry visits his two daughters every... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 9
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Ginny knows that it’s been three months since Rose’s operation, meaning that Rose, who’s been undergoing chemotherapy, has to check in with the hospital.... (full context)
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Rose and Ginny walk through the city, and Rose admits that she’s been depressed for a... (full context)
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While shopping, Ginny and Rose talk about Caroline, who hasn’t spoken to Larry since he slammed the door in her... (full context)
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Ginny admits to Rose that she’s always had problems opening up to people outside her family; she remembers that... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 10
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...an agreeable child who never bothered anyone, and Larry often said she was better than Rose or Ginny. Larry would ask Caroline to give him a kiss, and she’d oblige right... (full context)
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Rose and Ginny looked out for Caroline, their little sister. In high school, they made sure... (full context)
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After driving Rose home, Ginny decides to call Caroline. She drives back to her home, past Larry’s house,... (full context)
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Rose calls Ginny later that evening and reports that she can see Larry from her house,... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 12
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The next evening, Jess comes for dinner again. Rose, Ginny has heard, will be out of town tomorrow to pick up Linda and Pammy... (full context)
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One night, Jess comes over for Monopoly with Rose and Pete, and says that Harold is planning to remodel his house using concrete in... (full context)
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At Monopoly night, Ginny and Rose talk about Larry’s expensive, irresponsible orders, and Rose notes that Ginny is “running out of... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 13
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...thinks about what Mary has said: Mary sized her up completely. She also realizes that Rose has ended up a lot like their mother, Mrs. Cook: both women ended up in... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 14
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Back at Rose’s home, Ginny finds Ty, Rose, and Pete. Rose tells Ginny that Jess is coming over... (full context)
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...right. When Caroline is sure that Larry is fine, she asks Ginny if she and Rose have signed the corporation paperwork, and Ginny says that everything has been taken care of.... (full context)
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After her phone call, Rose tells Ginny that Caroline barely visited her during her time in the hospital, and suggests... (full context)
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A few days after the dinner, Ginny and Rose go to visit Larry for their annual Father’s Day dinner. At dinner, Larry is morose—the... (full context)
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After dinner, Ty says that Ginny and Rose don’t understand their father at all. Ty explains that Larry is now afraid of his... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 16
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...eggs, even though she could have simply gone across the street to get some from Rose. (full context)
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Ginny remembers that Caroline always got along with Larry better than she or Rose did. In college, Caroline would have complicated psychological theories about why Larry was the way... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 19
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...Ginny and her family learn that Caroline has gotten married to Frank in Des Moines. Rose only discovers the marriage while she’s shopping at the store and absent-mindedly reading the paper.... (full context)
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Rose angrily stands up from the Monopoly game and throws the board to the ground, infuriating... (full context)
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...he reports that Larry has been in a car accident, and he’s in the hospital. Rose mutters, “It’s about time.” Rose and Ginny drive separately to the hospital, and in their... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 20
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In the hospital, Ginny and Rose find Larry in the waiting room, being very quiet. Larry has been mildly injured, but... (full context)
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...and put him in bed. The next morning they fix him breakfast as usual, and Rose drops by to see him. Privately, Ginny and Rose discuss what to do about their... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 22
King Lear and Good vs. Evil Theme Icon
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...the appointment, Larry and Ginny go eat dinner, though Ginny isn’t hungry. Larry mutters that Rose and Ginny should show him more respect—just because his land is theirs doesn’t mean they... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 23
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Rose calls Ginny at night, saying that Pete’s truck has disappeared; Larry might have taken it.... (full context)
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...watching TV. Late at night, after the nieces are asleep, Ty returns home and tells Rose and Ginny that he’s found Larry: Larry has some things to tell his daughters. Rose... (full context)
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...warns her that her own children will treat her just as horribly when she’s old. Rose pulls Ginny into the house. Ginny sees that outside, Larry has punched Pete in the... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 24
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...to go check if Larry has found his way back to his own place or Rose’s place. (full context)
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...whore—she wonders if he could possibly know about her affair with Jess. Inside the house, Rose says that Larry is clearly crazy. The phone rings, and Ty reports that Larry is... (full context)
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Rose and Ginny continue talking about Larry. Rose remembers the time after Mrs. Cook died, when... (full context)
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Rose continues to tell Ginny about Larry’s sexual abuse. In high school, Rose felt that it... (full context)
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Ginny doesn’t know what to say to Rose, except, “It didn’t happen to me.” Rose hisses that she won’t let Larry get away... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 25
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...asleep, Ginny can’t stop thinking about what she’s just learned: Larry used to sexually abuse Rose. Although Larry never had sex with Ginny (that Ginny can remember), Ginny remembers Larry coming... (full context)
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...to Harold’s house, where he yelled until Loren found him there. Larry was yelling about Rose and Ginny being whores. Jess also mentions that he and Pete had an argument: Pete... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 26
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...be able to honor their loan, due to Larry’s “problems.” Ginny is confused: she and Rose control the land because of their corporation deal. Marv explains that the bank feels uncomfortable... (full context)
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...by to tell Ginny that there’s a problem: Larry refuses to visit with Ginny or Rose anymore. Ginny insists that Larry is being foolish; she and her sister treat their father... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 27
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...decides that it’s time for her family to start seeing a psychiatrist: about Larry’s insanity, Rose’s sexual abuse and trauma, etc. Ginny tries to find a suitable psychiatrist, but then it... (full context)
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Ginny meets with Rose and tells her that it’s time to confront Larry about his abuse. Rose is reluctant... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 28
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It’s Sunday, and the church holds a huge potluck. Ginny and Rose wear their best clothes and go to church, where they find Larry, looking oddly submissive... (full context)
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Finally, Larry comes to speak with Rose and Ginny. He immediately launches into a description of homes for the elderly, insisting that... (full context)
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Everybody takes food and sits down to enjoy the meal. Rose and Ginny sit near Larry and Harold and try to make conversation with their father,... (full context)
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Rose and Ginny leave the potluck—Harold Clark’s insults have left them unable to talk to their... (full context)
Book 4, Chapter 29
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After the disastrous potluck, Jess tells Ginny and Rose that he needs a new place to stay while Larry and Harold calm down. Rose... (full context)
Book 4, Chapter 30
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...about Harold’s blindness, and seems angry that Ginny isn’t more sympathetic. Ginny goes to tell Rose about the accident. Rose is completely unsympathetic to the news: she reminds Ginny of how,... (full context)
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Jess enters the house, and has a serious talk with Ginny and Rose. Rose accuses Jess of pretending to feel sorry for his father because he wants to... (full context)
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After their conversation, Ginny, Rose, and Jess don’t visit Harold in the hospital at all. When Ginny sees Loren, they... (full context)
Book 4, Chapter 31
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Back in the present, Ginny learns that Caroline is helping Larry sue her and Rose, citing the revocation clause of the corporation agreement. Several days after hearing the news, Ginny... (full context)
Book 4, Chapter 32
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...Ginny tells him about her lawsuit. Without answering, Pete asks Ginny, “What do you think Rose wants?” Ginny isn’t sure what to say—eventually, she answers, “For this all to be over.” (full context)
Book 4, Chapter 33
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...never told Ty about. Ty reveals that he already knew that Ginny had another secret miscarriage—Rose told him about it. Ginny is surprised that Rose would betray her trust. Ginny also... (full context)
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...lately she’s hated Ty: for talking to Caroline about Larry, for weakening her trust in Rose, etc. Ty says that Ginny has destroyed his excitement in the hog pen: he was... (full context)
Book 4, Chapter 34
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...peace with her father. He hints that there’s been a lot of “gossip” about what Rose and Ginny have done to Larry, but when Ginny presses him for details, he gives... (full context)
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...to the center of Cabot, her town. She goes to an old antique store where Rose used to sell furniture. There, the store’s owner, Dinah, recognizes Ginny, and tells her that... (full context)
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...Larry. While they shop, Caroline tells Larry that they’ll need to talk to Ginny and Rose today. Larry insists that there’s no need: he’s perfectly happy spending his time shopping with... (full context)
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Afterwards, Ginny leaves the store and drives back the town. There, she tells Rose that she overheard Caroline and Larry, and she was shocked by how kindly and affectionately... (full context)
Book 5, Chapter 36
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In Mason City, Ginny, Ty, Rose, and Pete meet with their new lawyer, Jean Cartier. Ginny thinks of Mr. Cartier as... (full context)
Book 5, Chapter 37
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The morning after Pete’s death, Rose comes to Ginny’s house and tells her that Pete has “drowned himself.” Ginny is stunned,... (full context)
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Rose gathers Linda and Pammy and tells them “some really bad news.” Meanwhile, Ginny proceeds with... (full context)
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Late at night, Rose calls Ginny and asks her to come over. Ginny remembers that after Rose was diagnosed... (full context)
Book 5, Chapter 38
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Immediately after the events of the last chapter, Ginny goes to see Rose, where she finds her sister very drunk. Rose confesses to Ginny that she’s furious with... (full context)
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Rose and Ginny walk outside, and Rose admits that her marriage to Pete was sad, even... (full context)
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Rose reminds Ginny that Larry used to beat them and have sex with them. As Ginny... (full context)
Book 5, Chapter 39
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The immediate effect of Ginny’s discovery that Rose is sleeping with Jess is that she thinks she understands everyone in her life now.... (full context)
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...find an especially deadly poison, like arsenic, and explains that she was trying to kill Rose with it. After much research, she settles on hemlock for the murder, and thinks with... (full context)
Book 5, Chapter 40
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...few able-bodied men around who’s willing to help Ty). There’s less than a month until Rose and Ginny are set to appear in court. Ginny watches her husband and Jess harvest... (full context)
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A month goes by, and Caroline and Frank appear in court opposite Ginny and Rose. In court, Caroline ignores her sisters but smiles at Ty, who smiles back. Ginny is... (full context)
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...win: the harvest has been a great success, meaning that, per Cartier’s advice, she and Rose will be able to withstand Larry’s attacks. The first witness is Larry, and he’s examined... (full context)
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...shouts, “Caroline’s dead.” Caroline, who’s sitting in court rushes to Larry’s side. Larry mutters that Rose and Ginny, “those bitches,” have killed Caroline. Larry says that Caroline used to sing “like... (full context)
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...the hearing is to determine if the farmland has been mismanaged—not how poorly Ginny and Rose treated Larry. (full context)
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Marv testifies that the farm is in debt, but only because Ginny and Rose are planning a hog farm that, in Marv’s opinion, will be highly successful. After Marv’s... (full context)
Book 5, Chapter 41
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After the verdict, Rose and Ginny pursue their farming ventures: they have no other choice, since they’re deep in... (full context)
Book 6, Chapter 42
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...with customers. She stays in the YMCA until Christmas, when she writes a note to Rose telling her where she is. Ginny is surprised to get a note in return: she... (full context)
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In Rose’s note, she explains that she and Ty divided the farm evenly: Rose and Jess will... (full context)
Book 6, Chapter 43
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...and she realizes that the man is Ty. Ginny greets Ty casually and asks how Rose is doing—to Ginny’s surprise, Ty explains that Rose is just fine. Ginny realizes that today... (full context)
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...work out well for Ty: the work nearly “killed” him. Ty hasn’t gotten along with Rose in years, and claims that Rose has just become Larry all over again. Nevertheless, he’s... (full context)
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...talking to Caroline all those years ago: giving her the information about how Ginny and Rose ignored Larry. Ty doesn’t deny it, but just says he was “on one side” of... (full context)
Book 6, Chapter 44
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Ginny continues to get letters and postcards from Rose, and each one infuriates her: they’re proof that Rose still isn’t dead, and that she... (full context)
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One day, Ginny gets a letter from Rose: Rose will be in the hospital in Mason City. Ginny agrees to go see her.... (full context)
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Ginny drives back to see Rose in the hospital, and tells her that Linda and Pammy are coming to see her... (full context)
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Rose tells Ginny what’s going to happen: after she dies, she’s leaving the farmland to Ginny... (full context)
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Ginny tells Rose that she tried to kill her years ago with the jar of poisoned sausages. Rose... (full context)
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Rose takes Ginny’s hand and tells her what she thinks about her own life: Rose hasn’t... (full context)
Book 6, Chapter 45
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...casually but not warmly. As they explore the house, they decide how to divide up Rose’s old things, such as her clothes and glasses. (full context)
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...who any of the other people are. Even the baby in the picture could be Rose, or Caroline, or Ginny. (full context)
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Caroline tells Ginny that she can’t understand how Ginny and Rose bankrupted Larry’s farm. She reminds Ginny that she (Caroline) was very close to Larry toward... (full context)
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...Caroline the truth about Larry, but in the end she loses her nerve. She imagines Rose, urging her to talk about how Larry raped his own children. But there are some... (full context)
Epilogue
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In the aftermath of Rose’s death and the sale of the farm, Caroline and Ginny find that they owe 34,000... (full context)