Angels in America

Angels in America

Pdf fan Tap here to download this LitChart! (PDF)

Angels in America Perestroika: Act 4, Scene 2 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Prior and Belize stand in Joe Pitt’s office building. Belize suggests that they leave, but Prior tells Belize to leave if he’s “chicken.” Prior explains that he wants to meet Joe, his “replacement.”
As the play goes on, the characters who don’t know one another seek each other out. Prior, still in love with Louis, wants to know whom Louis has been seeing.
Themes
Homosexuality in the AIDS Era Theme Icon
The Clash between People and Principles Theme Icon
While Belize waits outside, Prior confronts Joe. He tells Joe, “I’m a prophet.” Joe is confused, but Prior continues to talk. He compares Joe to the dummy he saw in the Mormon Visitors’ Center. He warns Joe of the dangers of stealing other people’s loves, and then leaves abruptly.
Kushner further confuses the idea of fantasy, as (to Harper at least) we have seen that Joe really was the dummy in the Mormon Visitor’s Center. Prior becomes an increasingly volatile, unpredictable character as the play continues—because of his disease, he has nothing to lose, and he seems to be embracing his identity as a prophet.
Themes
Homosexuality in the AIDS Era Theme Icon
Prophets and Prophecies Theme Icon
Progressivism, Conservatism, and Change Theme Icon
Fantasy, Escape, and Tragedy Theme Icon
The Clash between People and Principles Theme Icon
Joe rushes outside, where he finds Prior and Belize. Joe immediately recognizes Belize as Cohn’s nurse—something Belize denies unconvincingly. Prior and Belize try to run away from Joe, but Joe outruns them. Prior claims that he’s a mental patient, trying to “contest a will.” He calls Joe a pig. Joe hesitantly asks Prior if this is about Louis. Prior continues yelling at Joe, rather than answer Joe’s question. Belize, speaking in French, tells Prior that it’s time to leave, and together they walk out of the building.
In this amusing sequence, Belize and Prior do what they do best: they play roles. One thing that unites many of the characters is their talent for impersonation—from dressing in drag to reenacting theatrical roles. Performance and camp are important parts of life for the male gay community, especially as Kushner portrays it.
Themes
Homosexuality in the AIDS Era Theme Icon
Fantasy, Escape, and Tragedy Theme Icon
The Clash between People and Principles Theme Icon