Cyrano De Bergerac

Pdf fan dd71f526917d6085d66d045bd94fb5b55d02a108dd45d836cbdd4abe2d4c043d Tap here to download this LitChart! (PDF)
A poor, struggling man who performs many different jobs during the play, usually because of his friend Cyrano de Bergerac’s help. At the start of the play, Ragueneau is a popular pastry chef who runs a popular business, but loses money because of his own generosity. When his wife, Lise, leaves him, Ragueneau begins working for Roxane, thanks to Cyrano’s recommendation. Years later, Ragueneau is still working for Roxane, though he remains fiercely loyal to his friend Cyrano—indeed, Cyrano dies with Ragueneau close beside him.

Ragueneau Quotes in Cyrano De Bergerac

The Cyrano De Bergerac quotes below are all either spoken by Ragueneau or refer to Ragueneau . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the G. W. Dillingham Company edition of Cyrano De Bergerac published in 1898.
Act 1, Scene 2 Quotes

RAGUENEAU:
He's prouder than all the fierce Artabans of whom Gascony
has ever been and will ever be the prolific Alma Mater! Above his Toby ruff
he carries a nose!--ah, good my lords, what a nose is his! When one sees it
one is fain to cry aloud, 'Nay! 'tis too much! He plays a joke on us!' Then
one laughs, says 'He will anon take it off.' But no!--Monsieur de Bergerac
always keeps it on.

Related Characters: Ragueneau (speaker), Cyrano de Bergerac
Related Symbols: Cyrano’s Nose
Page Number: 28
Explanation and Analysis:

In this section, Ragueneau, a popular tavern-keeper, explains a few things about his friend, Cyrano de Bergerac. Cyrano, we're told, is an intensely proud person. He also has an enormous nose--so enormous that it looks like a prop for a party.

Ragueneau establishes the two key facts about Cyrano: 1) he's proud, and 2) he's got a huge nose. As we'll see very soon, these two facts are really one and the same: in other words, Cyrano is proud because he was born with a large nose. Cyrano has always had to defend his honor from bullies and wisecrackers. Although his nose could be considered an embarrassing debility, Cyrano has learned to "wear" his nose with pride, defending his honor against anyone foolish enough to poke fun at him.

A+

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other Cyrano De Bergerac quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!
Act 2, Scene 1 Quotes

LISE:
Before you were the sworn comrade of all that crew, my friend, you did not
call your wife ant and Bacchante!

RAGUENEAU:
To turn fair verse to such a use!

LISE:
'Faith, 'tis all it's good for.

RAGUENEAU:
Pray then, madam, to what use would you degrade prose?

Related Characters: Ragueneau (speaker), Lise (speaker)
Page Number: 76-77
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Ragueneau quarrels with his wife, Lise, about his practices as a store owner. Ragueneau has a soft spot for poetry and prose--as a result, he'll sometimes allow his literarily-minded customers to eat for free, provided that they can compose something for him in exchange.

Ragueneau's behavior is indicative of the Romantic ideal of the 19th century, when Rostand was writing his plays. Ragueneau is, above all, not a practical person--even if allowing people to eat for free is really bad business, Ragueneau values the world of ideas, feelings, and beautiful words more highly than the world of money. Much like Cyrano, Ragueneau is willing to live recklessly and romantically because of the strength of his ideals.

Act 2, Scene 4 Quotes

CYRANO (who has been watching, goes toward Ragueneau):
Lulled by your voice, did you see how they were stuffing themselves?

RAGUENEAU (in a low voice, smiling):
Oh, ay! I see well enough, but I never will seem to look, fearing to
distress them; thus I gain a double pleasure when I recite to them my poems;
for I leave those poor fellows who have not breakfasted free to eat, even
while I gratify my own dearest foible, see you?

CYRANO (clapping him on the shoulder):
Friend, I like you right well!. . .

Related Characters: Cyrano de Bergerac (speaker), Ragueneau (speaker)
Page Number: 86-87
Explanation and Analysis:

In this scene, Cyrano and Ragueneau bond over their common interest in poetry and art. Ragueneau is a popular tavern owner, but he’s not much of a businessman: he allows his patrons to eat for free if they’ll listen to his poetry. Cyrano’s reaction to Ragueneau’s situation is intriguing. He suggests that Ragueneau’s patrons are just taking advantage of him; i.e., they’re not really interested in listening to some tavern owner’s poetry, but just want the free food.

Cyrano’s observations about Ragueneau are important because Ragueneau’s situation parallels his own. Like Cyrano, Ragueneau’s commitment to poetry and romantic ideals lead him to throw away substantive sums of money. Ironically, Cyrano is capable of noticing the flaws in Rageneau’s behavior, but not his own. And at the end of the conversation, Cyrano confirms that he and Ragueneau really are guilty of the same tragic flaw: in spite of his objections, Cyrano admires anyone who savors poetry and performance, especially at the expense of worldly goods.

Get the entire Cyrano LitChart as a printable PDF.
Cyrano de bergerac.pdf.medium

Ragueneau Character Timeline in Cyrano De Bergerac

The timeline below shows where the character Ragueneau appears in Cyrano De Bergerac. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act 1, Scene 2
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
The Many Kinds of Love Theme Icon
Panache Theme Icon
Social Hierarchy and the Romantic Ideal Theme Icon
Suddenly, a short, fat man named Ragueneau enters the Hotel. Everyone cries out his name—Ragueneau is a beloved man and a famous... (full context)
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
Panache Theme Icon
...Marquises that Cyrano is a poet, a soldier, a philosopher, and a musician. And yet, Ragueneau joins in, Cyrano has one strange quality: his nose. Cyrano’s nose is enormous—so big that... (full context)
Act 1, Scene 3
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
Panache Theme Icon
Loyalty and Honor Theme Icon
...de Guiche sitting on the stage, watching. As the music plays, Le Bret whispers to Ragueneau that Cyrano has not come to the hotel that night. On the stage, the actor... (full context)
Act 1, Scene 6
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
The Many Kinds of Love Theme Icon
...tells the Duenna to tell Roxane to meet him at the pastry shop belonging to Ragueneau. The Duenna nods and leaves. (full context)
Act 2, Scene 1
Social Hierarchy and the Romantic Ideal Theme Icon
The second act (still set in Paris in the year 1640) takes place in Ragueneau’s pastry shop, where Cyrano has agreed to meet the love of his life, his cousin... (full context)
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
Social Hierarchy and the Romantic Ideal Theme Icon
Ragueneau walks through his shop, eager to start his day. His cooks are preparing nougat, custard,... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 2
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
The Many Kinds of Love Theme Icon
Social Hierarchy and the Romantic Ideal Theme Icon
Two children walk into Ragueneau’s pastry shop, asking for pies. Ragueneau prepares the pies but finds he has nothing in... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 3
The Many Kinds of Love Theme Icon
Panache Theme Icon
Cyrano de Bergerac enters Ragueneau’s pastry shop, and tells Ragueneau that he has one hour to wait. Ragueneau greets Cyrano... (full context)
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
The Many Kinds of Love Theme Icon
...to write love verses to Roxane. He produces a pen and goes to work as Ragueneau and Lise go about their mornings. (full context)
Act 2, Scene 4
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
The Many Kinds of Love Theme Icon
Panache Theme Icon
...he writes, a group of poets, dressed in black, enters the shop. The poets greet Ragueneau warmly, and Ragueneau notes that he always feels comfortable with poets right away. As Cyrano... (full context)
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
The Many Kinds of Love Theme Icon
Panache Theme Icon
Social Hierarchy and the Romantic Ideal Theme Icon
Ragueneau shows the poets something he’s been working on: a recipe in verse. He explains how... (full context)
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
The Many Kinds of Love Theme Icon
Panache Theme Icon
Loyalty and Honor Theme Icon
Cyrano and Ragueneau notice that Lise is speaking “tenderly” to a shop patron, a young Musketeer. Cyrano points... (full context)
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
The Many Kinds of Love Theme Icon
Ragueneau motions for the poets to follow him into a separate room, where they can read... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 5
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
Panache Theme Icon
...accompanied by the Duenna. Cyrano greets the Duenna and offers her some cakes and pastries (Ragueneau isn’t present to protest). Cyrano invites the Duenna to eat the cakes outside, and then... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 7
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
The Many Kinds of Love Theme Icon
Panache Theme Icon
As Cyrano sits alone in the shop, contemplating what Roxane has just told him, Ragueneau and the poets walk in. Ragueneau is about to ask Cyrano how his meeting with... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 8
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
The Many Kinds of Love Theme Icon
Panache Theme Icon
Social Hierarchy and the Romantic Ideal Theme Icon
Loyalty and Honor Theme Icon
Cyrano sits in the pastry shop with his cadets, Ragueneau, and Lise. The cadets ask Cyrano why he’s been picking fights with so many powerful... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 9
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
The Many Kinds of Love Theme Icon
Panache Theme Icon
Loyalty and Honor Theme Icon
...makes a nose joke, and Cyrano bellows, “Out! All of you!” The cadets, Carbon, and Ragueneau, sure that Cyrano is going to murder Christian, flee the room instantly. (full context)
Act 3, Scene 1
The Many Kinds of Love Theme Icon
Social Hierarchy and the Romantic Ideal Theme Icon
...the year 1640) begins in a small public square in Paris, adjacent to Roxane’s house. Ragueneau and the Duenna stand talking, and Ragueneau explains to the Duenna that his wife, Lise,... (full context)
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
The Many Kinds of Love Theme Icon
Panache Theme Icon
Social Hierarchy and the Romantic Ideal Theme Icon
The Duenna, listening to Ragueneau’s story, calls out to Roxane. Roxane is scheduled to visit a nearby house to hear... (full context)
Act 3, Scene 10
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
The Many Kinds of Love Theme Icon
Social Hierarchy and the Romantic Ideal Theme Icon
...that he’s still looking for Roxane’s home. He greets Cyrano, and then Roxane, Christian, and Ragueneau emerge from Roxane’s house. Roxane asks what’s going on, and the Monk explains that he’s... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 6
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
The Many Kinds of Love Theme Icon
...for the army: pasties, wine, etc. The cadets sprint to the carriage, where they find Ragueneau, bearing boxes of delicious food. The cadets feast on their food, yet neither Cyrano nor... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 2
Panache Theme Icon
Social Hierarchy and the Romantic Ideal Theme Icon
The nuns then tell Roxane that Ragueneau has come to the convent. Roxane tells de Guiche and Le Bret that Cyrano has... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 3
Panache Theme Icon
Social Hierarchy and the Romantic Ideal Theme Icon
Loyalty and Honor Theme Icon
Ragueneau arrives at the convent and explains to Le Bret that Cyrano has been attacked. While... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 5
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
The Many Kinds of Love Theme Icon
Panache Theme Icon
Loyalty and Honor Theme Icon
...“Christian” wooed her from outside her window. Before Cyrano can say more, Le Bret and Ragueneau enter. (full context)
Act 5, Scene 6
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
Panache Theme Icon
Loyalty and Honor Theme Icon
Le Bret and Ragueneau stare at Cyrano, shocked to see their friend in so much pain and suffering. They... (full context)
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
The Many Kinds of Love Theme Icon
Panache Theme Icon
...ground, drawing his sword and vowing never to surrender to death without a fight. Roxane, Ragueneau, and Le Bret are extremely surprised. Cyrano boasts that, in spite of his ugly appearance,... (full context)