Daisy Miller

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Randolph Miller Character Analysis

Daisy’s younger brother, a boy of nine. He possesses some of Daisy’s same characteristics: he speaks his mind, is rather forward with strangers, and doesn’t like to be told what to do—especially when this concerns his bedtime. Lacking Daisy’s beauty and charm, however, Randolph is more clearly just a spoiled child. He adores everything American and feels the difference between America and Europe keenly.

Randolph Miller Quotes in Daisy Miller

The Daisy Miller quotes below are all either spoken by Randolph Miller or refer to Randolph Miller. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
European and American Character Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Dover Publications edition of Daisy Miller published in 1995.
Part 1: Les Trois Couronnes Quotes

He thought it very possible that Master Randolph’s sister was a coquette; he was sure she had a spirit of her own; but in her bright, superficial little visage there was no mockery, no irony.

Related Characters: Mr. Winterbourne (speaker), Daisy Miller, Randolph Miller
Page Number: 6
Explanation and Analysis:

Winterbourne has just met the young Randolph, followed by his sister Daisy, in the garden of the hotel in Vevay, Switzerland where they all are staying. To Winterbourne, Daisy seems distracted and casual, though entirely frank in her attitude towards him. Here, he attempts to classify her within the available frameworks he has for interpreting female behavior. A "coquette" or flirt would usually be a pejorative term for a lady, suggesting that she breaks with established decorum. Winterbourne links the idea of a coquette with that of an independent spirit, something equally frowned upon for young woman. "But," he adds, there is something quite appealing in her attitude as well. To him she seems innocent rather than jaded: the label of a coquette might imply that a woman is perfectly aware of the seductive power she has over a man, and yet Daisy doesn't align with this attitude at all. 

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Part 2: Rome Quotes

Winterbourne meditated a moment. “They are very ignorant—very innocent only. Depend upon it they are not bad.”

Related Characters: Mr. Winterbourne (speaker), Daisy Miller, Mrs. Miller, Randolph Miller, Mrs. Costello
Page Number: 29
Explanation and Analysis:

Winterbourne has just arrived in Rome, and Mrs. Costello is updating him about the earlier arrival of the Millers and their shocking behavior—particularly that of Daisy, who has taken to showing up at parties with an Italian man with a moustache. Here, Winterbourne seems to carefully consider his aunt's judgment, though not to embrace it wholeheartedly. Although he seems to only be thinking about the evidence that his aunt has laid out for him, it is clear that his own experience with Daisy influences what he tells his aunt as well. 

Winterbourne does not entirely challenge his aunt's condemnation, but only seeks to explain it. "Ignorance" for him is not exactly a positive trait, but it is justifiable in terms of "innocence," rather than stemming from any kind of maliciousness. Winterbourne thus seeks to defend the Miller family's moral standing even as he refrains from justifying their behavior—for him it is simply that this behavior is socially rather than morally wrong. He seems to place a great deal of importance on his ability to describe and classify the Millers fairly, as well as on his ability to be an impartial judge in the matter. In that, Winterbourne fails to fully understand, or perhaps admit to himself, how much his own fascination for Daisy plays into this process of judgment.

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Randolph Miller Character Timeline in Daisy Miller

The timeline below shows where the character Randolph Miller appears in Daisy Miller. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1: Les Trois Couronnes
European and American Character Theme Icon
Observing vs. Living Theme Icon
...boy starts playing with a walking-stick he’s carrying, and the girl calls him by name, Randolph. Randolph cries that Winterbourne is “an American man,” and the girl calmly suggests that Randolph... (full context)
European and American Character Theme Icon
Judgment, Knowledge, and Knowability Theme Icon
Female Independence Theme Icon
...Geneva except under special circumstances. But the girl largely ignores him, bending down and asking Randolph if he’s going to take his pole to Italy. Winterbourne asks the lady if she’s... (full context)
European and American Character Theme Icon
Judgment, Knowledge, and Knowability Theme Icon
...she’s from New York State. Winterbourne asks her brother his name, and he says it’s Randolph C. Miller: his sister, he says, is Annie P. Miller, but she goes by Daisy,... (full context)
Female Independence Theme Icon
Daisy tells Winterbourne that Randolph misses home, and that there aren’t many boys around to play with him. Their mother... (full context)
Judgment, Knowledge, and Knowability Theme Icon
Innocence Theme Icon
...last week, but Daisy’s mother grew ill, she says; she regularly suffers from dyspepsia (indigestion). Randolph doesn’t care about castles and would rather stay at the hotel, she confides, but their... (full context)
European and American Character Theme Icon
Innocence Theme Icon
Female Independence Theme Icon
...suggestions, but Daisy looks at him and cries that she wishes he would stay with Randolph. Winterbourne hesitates, then says he’s rather go to the castle with Daisy. Winterbourne knows that... (full context)
European and American Character Theme Icon
Observing vs. Living Theme Icon
Judgment, Knowledge, and Knowability Theme Icon
Innocence Theme Icon
Female Independence Theme Icon
...alone. She was with her mother, she tells him, but she left to go pursue Randolph, who doesn’t like to go to bed. They remain there for a time, and Daisy... (full context)
Judgment, Knowledge, and Knowability Theme Icon
Female Independence Theme Icon
...gaily what she’s doing here, Mrs. Miller responds that she doesn’t know. She couldn’t get Randolph to bed, she says. Winterbourne says he’s had the pleasure of meeting Randolph. Mrs. Miller... (full context)
Judgment, Knowledge, and Knowability Theme Icon
Innocence Theme Icon
Female Independence Theme Icon
Eugenio frigidly announces that Randolph has gone to bed. Mrs. Miller tells Daisy to accompany her back, and Daisy looks... (full context)
European and American Character Theme Icon
Observing vs. Living Theme Icon
Female Independence Theme Icon
...that Winterbourne would travel with her and her family and educate them. He could be Randolph’s tutor, even. Winterbourne says he would love to do this, but he says he has... (full context)
Part 2: Rome
European and American Character Theme Icon
Observing vs. Living Theme Icon
Judgment, Knowledge, and Knowability Theme Icon
Female Independence Theme Icon
...Geneva. After ten minutes, however, the lady’s servant announces the arrival of Mrs. Miller, with Randolph and Daisy with her. Upon entering, Randolph declares that he knows Winterbourne. Winterbourne greets the... (full context)
European and American Character Theme Icon
Winterbourne asks if Mrs. Miller has been well. Randolph exclaims that she has dyspepsia, and he and his father do as well. Mrs. Miller... (full context)
Judgment, Knowledge, and Knowability Theme Icon
Female Independence Theme Icon
Daisy tells her mother to leave without her, as she’s going to walk. Randolph says she’s meeting Mr. Giovanelli. It’s the end of the afternoon, when many people are... (full context)
European and American Character Theme Icon
Female Independence Theme Icon
...the hotel at once, where a few other acquaintances are in Mrs. Miller’s salon, and Randolph is declaring that Daisy is sick with the fever from wandering around at night. (full context)