Gang Leader for a Day

Pdf fan Tap here to download this LitChart! (PDF)
Sudhir’s primary research subject, JT is a mid-level manager of the Black Kings, one of the larger, predominantly African-American gangs in Chicago in the 1980s and ‘90s. JT makes a living organizing the drug trade and managing other illicit or half-legal economies, including prostitution, within projects like the Robert Taylor Homes. He is also interested in the nature of Sudhir’s research, having studied some sociology himself in college, and he hopes that Sudhir will one day write his “biography.”

JT Quotes in Gang Leader for a Day

The Gang Leader for a Day quotes below are all either spoken by JT or refer to JT. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Hustling Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Penguin edition of Gang Leader for a Day published in 2008.
Chapter 1 Quotes

Go back to where you came from ... and be more careful when you walk around the city. ... You shouldn’t go around asking them silly-ass questions. ... With people like us, you should hang out, get to know what they do, how they do it. No one is going to answer questions like that. You need to understand how young people live on the streets.

Related Characters: JT (speaker), Sudhir Venkatesh
Page Number: 21
Explanation and Analysis:

It’s easy to see this conversation between JT and Sudhir as the foundation of Sudhir’s research. And, in a sense, it is. JT encourages Sudhir to do exactly the opposite of Bill Wilson’s survey – to go out and see what people do, how they live, and how they talk to one another, rather than to impose upon them a set of impressions, questions, and descriptions found on a questionnaire. Because JT has studied some sociology and has a college degree, he’s more familiar than many in the neighborhood with the nature of academic research. JT therefore knows that, despite their best efforts, sociologists sometimes find themselves quite removed from the people they study.

Sudhir, for his part, is very much willing to volunteer to observe the gang and its activities. As Dubner notes in his introduction, and as is apparent throughout the book to perhaps most readers, Sudhir’s work is difficult. It requires him to consistently make decisions about what is ethical, about how much to participate and when – and when to document an event without interfering. The years that Sudhir put into studying Robert Taylor are very little when compared with a life lived in that community – but it is a great deal more than nearly all researchers were willing to spend there until that time.

A+

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other Gang Leader for a Day quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!

Beer? ... You said I should hang out with folks if I want to know what their life is like.

Related Characters: Sudhir Venkatesh (speaker), JT
Related Symbols: Beer
Page Number: 25
Explanation and Analysis:

This is Sudhir’s response to JT and the rest of the BKs he met the night before. Most likely, JT expected that Sudhir would never return, that he would go back to the University of Chicago with a story or two, as he hints during their last conversation – and that would be that. But Sudhir, to his credit, allows not even another day to go by. And he notices right away that there is a form of “hanging out” currency among the gang members: beer.

Thus Sudhir offers to drink and chat with the gang members, and to begin to listen to them rather than to impose on them a set of guidelines the University has created for the “study” of urban populations. It perhaps also helps that many in the BKs are not able to identify the culture from which Sudhir comes – he is a second-generation Indian American from California, but he works and studies at a largely white institution. Thus, Sudhir frustrates some of the most obvious divisions between Hyde Park and the Robert Taylor Homes.

Chapter 2 Quotes

You always take the sure bet in this game. Nothing can be predicted—not supply, not anything. The [person] who tells you he’s going to have product a year from now is lying. He could be in jail or dead. So take your discount now.

Related Characters: JT (speaker), Sudhir Venkatesh
Page Number: 29
Explanation and Analysis:

JT enjoys dispensing advice to Sudhir about the nature of his work and the craft he brings to it. In particular, JT seems not to be fazed by the fact that he sells drugs, particularly crack cocaine, a “cheap high” that cannot be said to do any good for anyone who purchases it. JT instead believes that selling drugs is, at least indirectly, a way to “give back” to the community in which he lives. He justifies this by saying that profits from the drug-selling trade can be plowed back into the Robert Taylor Homes, in the form of donations to after-school programs, or little bits of cash given out to families or people in need.

And JT isn’t wrong in this – the gang really does help the community in some ways, in a symbiosis Sudhir spends much of the book trying to understand. But JT also sells a product that kills the people who use it. And although JT expresses a good deal of introspection over the course of the narrative, he never really questions the sale of crack, believing instead that people who rely on the drug are “crackheads” who deserve whatever comes to them.

And we don’t just fight each other. We have basketball tournaments, softball tournaments, card games. Sometimes it’s just people in the organization who play, but sometimes we find the best people in the building ... so it’s a building thing.

Related Characters: JT (speaker), Sudhir Venkatesh
Page Number: 41
Explanation and Analysis:

One thing Sudhir realizes is the interconnectedness of the BKs to the rest of the Robert Taylor Homes. Many people in the gang, and many people living in the building, second this view. The BKs take over much of what is left behind by a lack of housing authority support in the Homes and the near total lack of a police presence. The BKs really do support certain programs – especially for youth – and they try to arrange voter drives and encourage civic engagement.

But as Sudhir notes throughout the text, this is difficult to square with the reality that the BKs are a thoroughly “criminal enterprise.” Their profits derive largely, if not almost entirely, from the sale of crack cocaine in low-income neighborhoods. People who disagree with the gang are beaten, and, on very rare occasions, killed. And the gang pays off politicians and police officers in order to make sure its rule in the Robert Taylor Homes and in surrounding neighborhoods is secure.

Chapter 3 Quotes

He [JT] had no real sense of what I would actually be writing—because, in truth, I didn’t know myself. Nor did I know if he’d be upset with me for having seen him beat up C-Note, or if perhaps he’d try to censor me.

Related Characters: Sudhir Venkatesh (speaker), JT, C-Note
Page Number: 67
Explanation and Analysis:

This quote uncovers several important features of Sudhir’s work. First, he admits that his “learning” is largely unstructured – once he abandoned the questionnaire script given to him by people in his department, he was no longer operating according to the standardized principles of his discipline. Of course, Sudhir attempts to maintain objectivity and journalistic distance from the people whose lives he is exploring. But there is no stated “mission” or “goal” to his work for years on end.

It is only later, on encouragement from his advisers and after a few key breaks in his work, that Sudhir realizes he can track the flow of money in the underground economies of the Homes – especially once he has access to the ledgers T-Bone provides him. Only then does the research take a certain form. And it is the relative formlessness of Sudhir’s early investigations that provides both its freedom and, occasionally, its ethical ambiguity – as when, for example, he is not sure whether or not to intervene when JT and his lieutenants beat C-Note.

JT’s ambitions ran even higher. What he wanted, he told me, was to return the gang to its glory days of the 1960s, when South Side gangs worked together with residents to agitate for improvements in their neighborhoods.

Related Characters: Sudhir Venkatesh (speaker), JT
Page Number: 75-6
Explanation and Analysis:

As Sudhir notes, JT doesn’t really consider himself to be a leader of a gang. Instead, he believes that his position is one of community elder statesman. It is, for JT, a position that carries real responsibility, and he doesn’t take it lightly, although he does seem to enjoy the work that he does – and the perks the job affords (money, cars, alcohol).

What Sudhir here describes is a refrain throughout the book, and a great many characters speak it: that the gangs of the ‘60s and ‘70s had a real connection to the community in which they worked, and a degree of political influence that current gangs can only hope to achieve. But that is where JT comes in – he believes that there can be a fusion of the gang’s moneymaking and political-social missions, and he hopes to enact exactly this in the area around Robert Taylor.

Shorty-Lee was puzzled. He looked over to the three other BKs. They were toting spiral-bound notebooks in which they “signed up” potential votes. But it seemed that neither Lenny nor JT had told them there was an actual registration form and that registrars had to be licensed.

Related Characters: Sudhir Venkatesh (speaker), JT, Lenny Duster , Shorty-Lee
Page Number: 79
Explanation and Analysis:

Sudhir rapidly realizes that most of the foot soldiers in the gang don’t really know what they’re “registering” people in the building for, and, as a consequence, what voter registration and voter choice entail. They know it is important for the BKs to be involved in the political process, and in some sense their work, as Sudhir notes, echoes the “Chicago machine” politics of the earlier part of the twentieth century.

Thus Shorty-Lee’s lesson in civic engagement, as delivered by this woman at her door, is both a meaningful moment in his (and in Sudhir’s) education, and a reminder of the disconnect between the “official” culture of the world outside Robert Taylor and the unofficial, or gray-market, culture that exists within these neighborhoods. Just as CHA employees and the Chicago PD have relatively circumscribed interactions with the residents of the Homes, so, too, does the political process have only a glancing impact on the lives of most people there – unless JT and others attempt to connect foot soldiers with official institutions of the state, like the voter registry board or the Democratic party.

Chapter 6 Quotes

I spent the next few weeks turning the information in my notebooks into statistical tables and graphs that showed how much different hustlers made. I figured that JT would appreciate this data at least as much as my professors would...

Related Characters: Sudhir Venkatesh (speaker), JT
Page Number: 201
Explanation and Analysis:

This is perhaps Sudhir’s most naïve or disconnected moment in the text. He does not seem to think that his work here, and the information he collects, will be used by JT and Ms. Bailey to extract anything from the other tenants. As C-Note points out later on, however, Sudhir would have recognized this if he had thought more about the other people his work impacts. But, instead, Sudhir seemed only to delight in the amount of information he was receiving, without giving too much regard to the consequences of sharing that information.

This section also demonstrates Sudhir’s continued reliance on mathematical data, even as he has collected an enormous number of narrative accounts of life in the community he’s studying. The mixture of first-person and quantitative analysis will go on to form the basis of his independent work, a dissertation (and then book) on the gray-market and understudied economies of Chicago housing projects.

Chapter 7 Quotes

You didn’t have to get mixed up in this shit.
He must have heard that I’d helped drag Price into the lobby. I didn’t say anything. JT slapped my leg, asked if I wanted a Coke, and walked off to the fridge.

Related Characters: JT (speaker), Sudhir Venkatesh
Page Number: 225
Explanation and Analysis:

Perhaps as a counterpoint to Sudhir’s lack of involvement when C-Note was beaten, and to his participation, however small, in the beating of Bee-Bee, here Sudhir helps Price when he is in need, doing something substantial to save his life. As Sudhir notes, JT does not forget this, nor does he take it lightly. Instead, JT sees it as a sign of loyalty on Sudhir’s part – that Sudhir is willing to do what it takes to pitch in around the Homes, even when things become dangerous and violent.

This is another window into the bond that Sudhir and JT share. Although they do not always agree, they possess a kind of symbiotic relationship that, as Sudhir characterizes it, remains over the years, even as Sudhir rockets forward in his academic life and JT finds himself back in Chicago, with diminished gang prospects and his leadership position in the BKs no longer available.

Chapter 8 Quotes

...perhaps the most unconventional thing I ever did was embrace the idea that I could learn so much, absorb so many lessons, and gain so many experiences at the side of a man who was so far removed from my academic world.

Related Characters: Sudhir Venkatesh (speaker), JT
Page Number: 283
Explanation and Analysis:

Here, Sudhir more or less summarizes just what is so striking about his relationship with JT. On the one hand, nothing could have been less predictable or stranger than the idea that JT and Sudhir would strike up the “bond” that Sudhir here describes. This relationship is a testament not only to Sudhir’s curiosity, but to JT’s willingness to share parts of himself with an “outsider” to the projects, one whom he gradually gets to know.

Sudhir knows that he and JT will not be close forever, and that, as he has said sadly, their relationship itself becomes more and more distant as Sudhir progresses along his academic track. But JT, in a sense, “believed” in Sudhir from the start, and encouraged him to research by putting his heart and body on the line – by daring to think of himself as more than a mere academic “reporter” of life in the projects. And Sudhir here expresses genuine gratitude for what was, from JT, a leap of faith and an “unconventional thing” in its own right.

Get the entire Gang Leader for a Day LitChart as a printable PDF.
Gang leader for a day.pdf.medium

JT Character Timeline in Gang Leader for a Day

The timeline below shows where the character JT appears in Gang Leader for a Day. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1 - How Does It Feel to Be Black and Poor?
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
The young men do not threaten Sudhir, but they surround him until a man named JT arrives, and asks what Sudhir is doing in the Oakland projects. Sudhir repeats that he... (full context)
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
...up much of the night, as the young men around him – “foot soldiers” in JT’s gang, known as the Black Kings – tell stories, smoke, and drink beer. JT comes... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
...But after showering, he buys beer and goes back to the same project. He finds JT and says that, if JT says Sudhir should observe people and their daily lives, then... (full context)
Chapter 2 – First Days on Federal Street
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
Sudhir begins riding around in JT’s car and following him in some of his daily activities, although not, for the first... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Finally, by late spring of the first year of his research, Sudhir is asked by JT to accompany him on a gang-related visit, to Curly, another member of the Black Kings.... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
Sudhir doesn’t take notes when JT and Curly meet in Curly’s mother’s apartment in Robert Taylor. But Sudhir does recall that... (full context)
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
While JT is preparing to take over his new role, Sudhir researches (in the UChicago library) the... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
After a few weeks in the spring of 1990, when JT is situated in his new role as regional drug manager at Robert Taylor, he invites... (full context)
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
In particular, Sudhir gets to know JT’s mother, Ms. Mae. Ms. Mae often cooks for Sudhir, and tells him about her life... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
JT also takes Sudhir on tours of the different high-rises of the Robert Taylor Homes, and... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
...Clarisse, in her thirties, who is a prostitute in Robert Taylor and a relative of JT’s, although JT does not tell Sudhir this—Clarisse does. She says that she’s a “regular” prostitute... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
...his friends, also “regular” squatters, set up an auto-repair open-air market on the basketball courts. JT comes by after some time and tells C-Note to move, that there’s a BK-run basketball... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
C-Note does not back down from JT, and refuses to move his auto-repair equipment from the courts. But JT insists and, finally,... (full context)
Chapter 3 – Someone to Watch Over Me
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
...that, by the summer of 1990, after he has been observing the BKs (and especially JT) for about a year, he is shaken by the relationship between the gang’s “regulatory” function... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
Brass yells back at JT when JT accuses him of living there for free, and JT and others beat him... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
JT responds to Sudhir, however, that both Brass and C-Note had “questioned his authority,” and that... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
...1980s and early 1990s, when Sudhir was visiting the Robert Taylor Homes, gang leaders like JT were selling crack in especially competitive markets. This meant that any advantage one gang gained... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
Sudhir is especially surprised to learn from JT that the Black Kings pay off local city officials, including those on the Board of... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
...neighborhoods in the South Side—also have complex relationships with gangs like the BKs. Sudhir relates JT’s vision for a rejuvenated South Side, one in which, like during the ‘60s and ‘70s,... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
Sudhir follows other members of the Robert Taylor community, since JT is spending more and more time on political organizing efforts. Sudhir meets with Kris and... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
...Robert Taylor hope to organize as a community bonding effort. Sudhir attends and runs into JT, who walks in surrounded by other BKs. JT is surprised to see Sudhir there under... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Sudhir argues that he is still writing JT’s biography, at least primarily, and that he wants to know “what other people think about”... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
After the meeting, JT confronts Sudhir again in private, and politely but firmly tells him that, since Sudhir is... (full context)
Chapter 4 – Gang Leader for a Day
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
Times elapses, and its been three years that Sudhir has observed JT and others in the BKs and in the Robert Taylor Homes. In discussions with his... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
Sudhir listens to JT talk frequently about how he is the “CEO” of a group of people. But Sudhir... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
...on a weekly basis. Pastor Wilkins has offered a church room to the BKs, but JT and the lieutenants caution that Sudhir might not want to be indebted to Wilkins for... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
Sudhir then drives with T-Bone, Price, and JT to meet with Johnny, who owns a corner store near Robert Taylor. Johnny pays the... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
...claims he was stealing because Billy wasn’t paying him his full cut to begin with. JT and Sudhir walk away, and JT asks Sudhir what he would do to resolve the... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
...have broken the rules, their punishments should “offset,” like in the NFL—neither is then punished. JT thinks this is “smart” reasoning, as do the lieutenants, but JT also tells Sudhir that... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
To round out his day with the BKs, Sudhir rides with JT to various “street groups,” where “directors” report to JT what they’ve sold, in what quantities,... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
Sudhir is shocked to learn, during these rounds, that many people “rip off” JT to an extent in the handling of normal drug-selling. For example, “mixers” who bake the... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
...end of his day as gang leader, Sudhir is exhausted, and realizes just how much JT has to keep track of—nearly all of it in his head, as JT is worried... (full context)
Chapter 5 – Ms. Bailey’s Neighborhood
Hustling Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
...down and collected his thoughts, he goes back to the Homes. There, he runs into JT, who says that Ms. Bailey is angry with him. When he speaks to Ms. Bailey,... (full context)
Chapter 6 – The Hustler and the Hustled
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
...him to share his notes with law enforcement, if he’s ever subpoenaed. This is because JT and others in the BKs speak to him about events like drive-by shootings, and Sudhir... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Sudhir meets with Ms. Bailey and JT and tells them what he’s learned about the legal status of some of his research.... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
Sudhir begins interviewing pimps and prostitutes within the buildings – the interviews are arranged by JT and Ms. Bailey, and Sudhir is surprised to hear that many pimps and prostitutes are... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
...was fairly lucrative. One day, Sudhir meets with Ms. Bailey to catch up, and finds JT with her in her office. Sudhir, unthinking, shares a good deal of information with both... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
...days, Sudhir realizes that he’s angered nearly everyone he normally speaks to in the homes. JT and Ms. Bailey have gone around to tenants with boarders, to people like C-Note, and... (full context)
Chapter 7 – Black and Blue
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Sudhir describes an incident that causes him to bond more closely with JT. One day, sitting outside and enjoying the fine weather, Sudhir is talking to JT’s uncle,... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
JT allows other gang members to tend to Price upstairs once they’ve got him stabilized, and... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Sudhir learns from T-Bone that JT has been given a new job in the BK hierarchy, and that he’ll now be... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Shortly thereafter, Sudhir learns from JT that his new job as a higher-up in the BKs is the real thing. Sudhir... (full context)
Chapter 8 – The Stay-Together Gang
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
JT invites Sudhir to several of the BKs’ large-scale “gatherings” in the suburbs of Chicago, where... (full context)
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
...is interrupted by gunfire, which, though not indicative of a gang war (and instead attributable, JT thinks, to people high on drugs), is nevertheless a reminder of the constant dangers of... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
...It’s a prestigious position, and Sudhir realizes that he is pulling away from people like JT and Ms. Bailey, perhaps for good. Sudhir notes that the drug trade in Robert Taylor,... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Sudhir meets with JT one evening in Ms. Mae’s apartment, and tells him that he’ll be moving to Cambridge... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Sudhir recalls a meeting with JT in 1998, when they go out for dinner, and Sudhir realizes that he’s now a... (full context)
Hustling Theme Icon
Teaching and Learning Theme Icon
Objectivity and Empathy Theme Icon
Crime and the Police Theme Icon
Poverty Theme Icon
Sudhir reports to the reader that JT eventually moved into “legitimate” business and had “some money saved” from the gang; he also... (full context)