Going After Cacciato

Pdf fan dd71f526917d6085d66d045bd94fb5b55d02a108dd45d836cbdd4abe2d4c043d Tap here to download this LitChart! (PDF)

Lieutenant Corson Character Analysis

The middle-aged, experienced, and sometimes seemingly senile commander of Paul Berlin’s battalion following the death of Lieutenant Sidney Martin, Lieutenant Corson is ironically one of the least authoritative people in the unit. In the main storyline of the novel, Corson gives the order that the soldiers should pursue Cacciato out of Vietnam, but he’s mostly passive afterwards, usually deferring to the judgment of the younger, more energetic Oscar Johnson. As Corson moves farther from Vietnam, however, he becomes healthier and more spirited, striking up romances with Hamijolli Chand and later Sarkin Aung Wan, much to Berlin’s dismay. Corson is realistic about the futility of the soldiers’ mission to capture Cacciato, and says more than once that it’s downright pointless. In the novel’s ending—that is, in the storyline in which Berlin shoots Cacciato in Vietnam—Corson lies and reports that Cacciato is missing in action, effectively saving Berlin from being court-martialed.

Lieutenant Corson Quotes in Going After Cacciato

The Going After Cacciato quotes below are all either spoken by Lieutenant Corson or refer to Lieutenant Corson . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Broadway Books edition of Going After Cacciato published in 1999.
Chapter 10 Quotes

Then they were falling. Paul Berlin felt it in his stomach. A tumbling sensation. There was time to snatch for Sarkin Aung Wan's hand, squeeze tight, and then they were falling. The road was gone and they were simply falling, all of them, Oscar and Eddie and Doc, the old lieutenant, the buffalo and the cart and the old women, everything, tumbling down a hole in the road to Paris.

Related Characters: Paul Berlin , Lieutenant Corson , Sarkin Aung Wan , Oscar Johnson , Eddie Lazzutti
Related Symbols: Paris, Tunnels
Page Number: 76
Explanation and Analysis:

Paul Berlin and his fellow soldiers have stumbled upon a secret Vietcong lair, which may or may not be booby-trapped. Berlin and his fellow soldiers fall underneath the ground, though O'Brien never describes exactly how. It's left up to us to decide whether the episode is real or imagined: certainly, American soldiers encountered more surreal spectacles during their service in the war (and the Vietcong did have a complex system of tunnels during the war), and yet O'Brien depicts the soldiers' fall underground in fantastical terms that echo Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland, making us wonder if the entire scene is a dream or hallucination of some kind.

The soldiers' fall is deliberately paralleled with Cacciato's flight: Cacciato is slowly freeing himself from his duty to the military, while his fellow soldiers find themselves mired in the horrors of war. Once again, the soldiers associate Paris with peace, escape, and tranquility--and the hole into which they have fallen delays their journey to Paris. (Of course, it's worth noting that the peace and prosperity of Paris comes in part from the exploitation of poorer countries and its former colonies like Vietnam--surely a deliberate choice of symbol on O'Brien's part.)

A+

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other Going After Cacciato quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!
Chapter 15 Quotes

Sarkin Aung Wan uncurled her legs and stood up.
"There is a way," she said.
The lieutenant kept studying his hands. The fingers trembled.
"The way in is the way out."
Li Van Hgoc laughed but the girl ignored it.
"The way in," she repeated, "is the way out. To flee Xa one must join it. To go home one must become a refugee."
"Riddles!" Li Van Hgoc spat. "Insane!"
Sarkin Aung Wan took Paul Berlin's hand. "Do you see?" she said. "You do need me."

Related Characters: Sarkin Aung Wan (speaker), Li Van Hgoc / Van (speaker), Paul Berlin , Lieutenant Corson
Related Symbols: Tunnels
Page Number: 97
Explanation and Analysis:

Sarkin, who is still trapped underground with Paul Berlin and the other soldiers, offers some ambiguous wisdom in this passage: "the way in is the way out." Sarkin thinks that she has a way of escaping the tunnels--even though Hgoc, who's been around for far longer, denies any possibility of escape.

It's hard to take Sarkin's words literally (by this point in the novel, we're so confused about the tunnels that we don't know what to believe). But on a symbolic level, Sarkin's pronouncement has a lot to say about the soldiers' state of mind. Traumatized by war, Berlin and his friends are trying to return "home"--both in the sense that they're trying to make it back to the U.S. in one piece, and in the sense that they're trying to preserve their sanity. Just as Sarkin implies, in order to savor one's home, one must first become an outsider. We see this through Paul Berlin's behavior: not too long ago, he was a frustrated young man, eager to leave his home and fight in the army--now, however, he's desperate to return to the homeland and state of innocence he left behind. In short, Sarkin's ideas reflect the soldiers' broken-down, yet strangely optimistic, worldview.

Chapter 29 Quotes

"There it is. The old man's suffering from an advanced case. Nostalgia, it comes from the Greek. I researched it: straight from the Greek. Algos means pain. Nostos means to return home. Nostalgia: the pain of returning home. And the ache that comes from thinking about it. See my drift? The old man's basic disease is homesickness. Nostalgia for the goddamned war, the army, the lifer's life. And the dysentery, the fever, it's just a symptom of the real sickness."
"So what do we do?"
"Time," Doc said. He put his glasses on. "It's the only antidote for nostalgia. Just give the man time."

Related Characters: Paul Berlin (speaker), Doc Peret (speaker), Lieutenant Corson
Page Number: 183-184
Explanation and Analysis:

The soldiers arrive in the city of Tehran, but their supposed leader, Lieutenant Corson, is almost incapable of leading anyone: he's an older, weak man, and he's pining for a woman named Jolly, whom he met in India. Doc make a slightly different, and rather contradictory claim: that Corson is suffering from nostalgia, the fear of leaving the army behind altogether and the fear of returning home. So it's not clear what Corson's problem really is: if he's sad about leaving something behind, or if he's afraid of returning, or both.

The passage represents one of the closest links between O'Brien's novel and Homer's Odyssey, the Greek epic poem that's often cited as a major influence on this novel. O'Brien writes about a group of old veterans trying to reach home once again; in the same way, Homer wrote about Odysseus and his group of veterans trying to return to their island of Ithaca. Doc's explanation that Corson needs "time" might also suggest that there's no true cure for a soldier's PTSD--Doc can only hope that the soldiers learn to readjust to civilian life.

Chapter 38 Quotes

Like a daughter caring for an ailing father, she encouraged him to eat and exercise, coddled him, scolded him, gently coaxed him into showing some concern for his own welfare and that of his men. The lieutenant seemed deeply attached to her. It was an unspoken thing. They would sometimes spend whole days together, walking the decks or throwing darts or simply sitting in the sun.
When the lieutenant showed signs of the old withdrawal, Sarkin Aung Wan would remind him of his responsibilities. "A leader must lead," she would say. "Without leadership, a leader is nothing."

Related Characters: Sarkin Aung Wan (speaker), Lieutenant Corson
Page Number: 256
Explanation and Analysis:

As Sarkin, Paul, and the other troops get closer and closer to Paris, their commander, Lieutenant Corson, gets more and more healthy. In war, Corson was sickly and ineffectual, but away from battle he seems to have regained his strength. Corson's improving illustrates the personal toll that war takes on a human life, whether one lives or dies. The Lieutenant has fought in many wars, and over a lifetime of battle, he's accumulated more weakness and sadness than most people could bear.

It's also important, of course, to note that it's Sarkin who cares for Corson. Even though Corson is a symbol of destruction and aggression in Sarkin's native country of Vietnam, Sarkin still treats him with kindness.

Chapter 46 Quotes

"I guess it's better this way," the old man finally said. "There's worse things can happen. There's plenty of worse things."
"True enough, sir."
"And who knows? He might make it. He might do all right." The lieutenant's voice was flat like the land. "Miserable odds, but—"
"But maybe."
"Yes," the lieutenant said. "Maybe so."

Related Characters: Paul Berlin (speaker), Lieutenant Corson (speaker), Cacciato
Related Symbols: Paris
Page Number: 336
Explanation and Analysis:

In this final scene, a flashback to the beginning of the novel, Paul and Lieutenant Corson (who will eventually become rivals for Sarkin's love), discuss the possibility that Cacciato--who's just run away from the army--will succeed in reaching Paris. Strangely, both men agree that Cacciato very well might succeed in his quest, unlikely as it seems.

In a way, Cacciato's disappearance is meant to symbolize the soldiers' desire to survive the war in Vietnam--if Cacciato can make it all the way to Paris unharmed, then perhaps Paul, Corson, and the others can make it back to the U.S. sane and in one piece, too. The scene also reminds us that the novel we've just read might be the product of Paul's imagination--perhaps Cacciato is killed early on in his journey, but Paul continues imagining that Cacciato makes it away from the war and completes his unlikely odyssey to Paris. In the end, O'Brien leaves us with a cautious optimism--perhaps it's possible for the soldiers of this bloody, brutal war to survive while also maintaining their sanity--and perhaps it's hope, imagination, and fantasy that helps them do so.

Get the entire Going After Cacciato LitChart as a printable PDF.
Going after cacciato.pdf.medium

Lieutenant Corson Character Timeline in Going After Cacciato

The timeline below shows where the character Lieutenant Corson appears in Going After Cacciato. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
Vietnam and the Chaos of War Theme Icon
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...war.” The other soldiers try to understand what this means, and where he’s gone. Lieutenant Corson, the leader of the soldiers, is so old and weak that he’s developed a bad... (full context)
Vietnam and the Chaos of War Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
Corson calls Cacciato’s friend, Paul Berlin, to discuss Cacciato’s disappearance. Corson asks Berlin if it’s true... (full context)
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...looking through before he deserted the army. Although most of the atlas has been burnt, Corson notices that Cacciato has drawn a red line across the pages of the map. The... (full context)
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
As Corson studies the pages of Cacciato’s atlas, Doc suggests that they let Cacciato go ahead, rather... (full context)
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...followed—as he climbs up the mountain, he looks back and sees his former squad. Lieutenant Corson mutters, “I’m a sick, sick man,” as he and his soldiers proceed. It begins to... (full context)
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
Night falls on the mountains, and the soldiers make camp. Lieutenant Corson vomits from dysentery, but continues to lead the men. He uses his radio to tell... (full context)
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...the distance. Cacciato looks surprisingly calm and casual—in fact, he looks like a civilian. Lieutenant Corson orders Stink to a fire a shot in Cacciato’s general direction—the goal being to scare... (full context)
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Vietnam and the Chaos of War Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...the inevitable “Boom.” But no explosion comes. Instead, there is a hissing sound, and Lieutenant Corson shouts that the squad has triggered a smoke bomb. Bright red smoke engulfs the soldiers.... (full context)
Vietnam and the Chaos of War Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...for the smoke, and asked Johnson how the squad is “holding up.” Johnson asks Lieutenant Corson, “Why not let him go, sir?” Corson only replies that he needs “rest.” (full context)
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Vietnam and the Chaos of War Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...wakes up and sees a small fire in the distance—Cacciato is cooking himself breakfast. Lieutenant Corson wakes up and announces, “let’s do it.” Eddie, Oscar, and Harold Murphy proceed towards Cacciato,... (full context)
Chapter 3
Vietnam and the Chaos of War Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
Doc studies his map and talks to Lieutenant Corson. He shows Corson the group’s progress: they’re nearing the neighboring country of Laos—a dangerous area.... (full context)
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Vietnam and the Chaos of War Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...the border between their country and Laos. There are no bridges over the river, but Corson orders his man to wade across it. They do so, slowly and carefully. To their... (full context)
Vietnam and the Chaos of War Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
One afternoon, the soldiers are marching over a small creek when Lieutenant Corson collapses. He’s been suffering from dysentery lately, and hasn’t been dealing with the march well.... (full context)
Chapter 4
Vietnam and the Chaos of War Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...men. Although Martin is a talented soldier, he dies quickly, to be replaced by Lieutenant Corson. Everyone can sense that Corson is terrified of battle. (full context)
Chapter 6
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Vietnam and the Chaos of War Theme Icon
...Harold Murphy’s desertion, the soldiers continue West into Laos, led by an increasingly unhealthy Lieutenant Corson. Along the way, they find other small objects that seem to signal Cacciato’s presence nearby.... (full context)
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Vietnam and the Chaos of War Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...away from Saigon, where she once lived. The two older women are her aunts. Lieutenant Corson asks Sarkin where she and her aunts are heading, and Sarkin replies that they’re heading... (full context)
Chapter 7
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Vietnam and the Chaos of War Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...sure what to say. He explains that according to Doc, the war is over. Lieutenant Corson, on the other hand, believes that the war is still going on. Sarkin replies that... (full context)
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
Shortly after Berlin’s conversation with Sarkin, Berlin asks Lieutenant Corson about keeping Sarkin around as a guide—she could be useful, since she speaks French. Corson... (full context)
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
Shortly after Corson and Berlin’s conversation, the narrator explains, the soldiers “capture Cacciato.” It remains to be seen... (full context)
Chapter 10
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...find a message: “Look out, there’s a hole in the road.” After reading this, Lieutenant Corson formulates a new plan: based on the maps, it seems that Cacciato is headed for... (full context)
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Vietnam and the Chaos of War Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...as possible. Sarkin squeezes Berlin’s hand and whispers, “You will find a way.” Then Lieutenant Corson swats the buffalo, signaling it to begin driving the cart away. Berlin, overcome with emotion,... (full context)
Chapter 13
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
Lieutenant Corson points a gun at the man in the green uniform and demands to know who... (full context)
Chapter 15
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Vietnam and the Chaos of War Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...them a beautiful lounge area, and a large kitchen full of delicious-smelling food. Suddenly, Lieutenant Corson interrupts Van, and explains that he and his troops “need to get going.” Van laughs... (full context)
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Vietnam and the Chaos of War Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
...Van cries out that Sarkin is speaking in riddles, and can’t be trusted. But Lieutenant Corson, who seems to be in a trance state, looks at Sarkin and decides to follow... (full context)
Chapter 18
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...to Harold Murphy, and to their memories together. Doc then proposes a toast to Lieutenant Corson—a man with, Doc claims, 25 years of combat service. He even proposes a toast for... (full context)
Chapter 21
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...traveling away from Mandalay to Chittagong. The only other soldier who is awake is Lieutenant Corson. Corson confesses to Berlin that he sometimes feels like he’s in the middle of a... (full context)
Chapter 22
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
Lieutenant Corson is a widower, but he still wears his wedding ring. He’s different from other lieutenants,... (full context)
Chapter 23
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
...Delhi, and come to the Hotel Phoenix. It is there, the narrator confides, that Lieutenant Corson falls in love. (full context)
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
At the Hotel Phoenix, Corson sees a woman wearing a blouse and blue jeans. To Corson’s surprise, the woman—an Indian—is... (full context)
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...in the United States, and asks Stink about his family. Jolly is especially nice to Corson, who quickly becomes very drunk. Corson talks about his military service in Korea, and notes... (full context)
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
...goes on, and Berlin spends time with Sarkin, drinking brandy and kissing her neck. Meanwhile, Corson is still talking to Jolly, but then he starts to weep, saying, “What happened to... (full context)
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
The next morning, Corson and Jolly don’t come down for breakfast. Jolly’s husband serves tea to the hotel guests.... (full context)
Chapter 26
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
One day, Corson shows Berlin a copy of the local newspaper. Amazingly, there is a photograph of Cacciato... (full context)
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
Before he leaves, Lieutenant Corson has a glass of cognac with Jolly Chand. Corson seems to be overcome with emotion.... (full context)
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
Doc leaves Corson and tells the troops that Corson isn’t coming. Some of the soldiers want to wait... (full context)
Chapter 27
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...They watch the mountains of Punjab, Peshawar, and Kabul. Sitting with the soldiers is Lieutenant Corson—the soldiers have brought him along. Corson wakes up and asks where he is. Then he... (full context)
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
Paul Berlin watches Corson smoke his cigarette, and thinks back to his own experiences earlier in the year. After... (full context)
Chapter 29
Vietnam and the Chaos of War Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...they celebrate Christmas—making decorations, brewing eggnog, and even smoking the last of Oscar’s marijuana. Lieutenant Corson gets very sick again, but it’s not clear exactly why. Doc tries to care for... (full context)
Vietnam and the Chaos of War Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...the beheading.” It is a cold winter’s afternoon in Tehran, and the soldiers are carrying Corson through the streets so that he can get some fresh air. They notice a large... (full context)
Vietnam and the Chaos of War Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...a deserter, he says, then he must be punished severely, like a dog. Strangely, Lieutenant Corson, who has been listening to Rhallon and Doc’s conversation, seems to scoff at the idea... (full context)
Chapter 33
Vietnam and the Chaos of War Theme Icon
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...is handcuffed and brought into a large room, along with Stink, Eddie, Doc, Oscar, and Corson. Sarkin is thrown into this room as well. She kisses Berlin’s throat. Berlin sees that... (full context)
Chapter 38
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...table in various taverns in the city. The passage to Athens is remarkably calm—indeed, Lieutenant Corson’s health improves with the sun and fresh sea air. Sarkin is largely responsible for restoring... (full context)
Chapter 43
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...that they buy it. Berlin agrees, but tells Sarkin that he has to tell Lieutenant Corson before he buys a place to live. Sarkin agrees, and notes, “Isn’t it better to... (full context)
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
Berlin goes to speak with Lieutenant Corson shortly after Eisenhower’s death. He finds the lieutenant in his hotel room, smelling of alcohol.... (full context)
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
Berlin leaves Corson, returns to Sarkin, and tells her, “it’s done.” Sarkin, pleased, takes Berlin to shop for... (full context)
Chapter 44
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...next morning, the soldiers begin their search. They take maps and divide Paris into sections. Corson refuses to search the city—in part because of his health, and in part because he... (full context)
Chapter 46
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
...“split.” As Berlin and Doc talk, it becomes clear that Doc is talking about Lieutenant Corson. He and Sarkin have left Paris, taking with them everything in the apartment were Berlin... (full context)
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
With Lieutenant Corson gone, Oscar Johnson becomes the soldiers’ official commanding officer. He orders everyone to stake out... (full context)
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Vietnam and the Chaos of War Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
The next day, the soldiers proceed through Vietnam. Lieutenant Corson sends a radio message in which he reports that Cacciato is missing in action. The... (full context)
Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Storytelling Theme Icon
Vietnam and the Chaos of War Theme Icon
Obligation vs. Escape Theme Icon
Discontinuity and Trauma Theme Icon
Survival and Self-Preservation Theme Icon
Later in the night, Berlin wakes up to find Lieutenant Corson sitting next to him. Corson tells Berlin, “I guess it’s better this way.” Together, they... (full context)