Paradise Lost

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God’s greatest enemy and the ruler of Hell. Satan (his original name is erased; “Satan” means “Adversary”) was one of the most powerful Archangels, but then became jealous of God and convinced a third of God’s angels to rebel with him. Satan is cast into Hell, which he proudly rules until he realizes Hell is inside his soul and he can never escape suffering. He resolves to corrupt whatever he can of God’s goodness, and flies to Earth to tempt Adam and Eve. Satan is meant to be the antagonist of the poem, but he is also the most dynamic, interesting character.

Satan Quotes in Paradise Lost

The Paradise Lost quotes below are all either spoken by Satan or refer to Satan. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Hierarchy and Order Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Penguin Classics edition of Paradise Lost published in 2003.
Book 1 Quotes

Fall’n Cherub, to be weak is miserable
Doing or suffering: but of this be sure,
To do aught good never will be our task,
But ever to do ill our sole delight,
As being the contrary to his high will
Whom we resist. If then his Providence
Out of our evil seek to bring forth good,
Our labour must be to pervert that end,
And out of good still to find means of evil…

Related Characters: Satan (speaker)
Page Number: 1.157-165
Explanation and Analysis:

Critics have often noted the irony of Milton's poem: although he's writing about God and the fall of man, the most fascinating character in the book isn't a man at all; it's Satan. In this passage, Milton shows Satan's fall from Heaven--cast out by God for rebellion, Satan writhes in agony in Hell. Satan tells his loyal follower, Beelzebub, that they must find hope: even if they've been punished for their acts of evil against God, they must spend their time doing evil and undermining the work of God.

A natural question, then, is how can Satan hope to undermine the authority of almighty, omnipotent God? Satan seems not to know himself--he's so new to the world of evil that he's working it out as he goes. In a way, Satan's ambition to overcome his odds and do evil is oddly inspiring, and Milton actually seems to build sympathy for Satan by narrating the story from his point of view. Some have argued that Milton is trying to "tempt" readers to sympathize with Satan, while others have argued that Milton actually  (subconsciously) sympathizes with Satan himself.

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The mind is its own place, and in itself
Can make a Heav’n of Hell, a Hell of Heav’n…
Here we may reign secure, and in my choice
To reign is worth ambition though in Hell:
Better to reign in Hell, than serve in Heav’n.

Related Characters: Satan (speaker)
Page Number: 1.254-263
Explanation and Analysis:

In this famous passage, Satan claims that he would rather be free and independent of God's authority, even if it means living in Hell, than serve God mindlessly and be rewarded with Heaven. In other words, Satan aspires to be "his own boss"--he wants to rule over his henchmen the devils, essentially being the "god" of Hell. His argument here is that the devils can turn Hell into their own Heaven, as long as they remain free in their minds. This also foreshadows Satan's later realization that "Hell" is not a place at all--it's something he carries within himself. So far from being able to turn Hell into Heaven, he can in fact never escape Hell, no matter where he goes. But at this point in the poem he remains more optimistic.

While Satan's statement seems bitter, petty, and manipulative, on another level it's also somewhat inspiring--the way he talks about using his mind and his imagination to achieve happiness is, one could argue, deeply human. Satan is a kind of Romantic hero--a bold, imaginative, yet evil figure who aspires to cause pain and suffering to everyone rather than submit his pride to another's.

Book 2 Quotes

Thus Beelzebub
Pleaded his devilish counsel, first devised
By Satan, and in part proposed; for whence,
But from the author of all ill could spring
So deep a malice, to confound the race
Of mankind in one root, and earth with Hell
To mingle and involve, done all to spite
The great Creator? But their spite still serves
His glory to augment.

Related Characters: Satan, God the Father, Beelzebub
Page Number: 2.379-386
Explanation and Analysis:

Satan has assembled a vast group of devils, his henchmen (who were cast out of Heaven along with him). Satan has held the council to decide what to do now that their open revolt against God has failed, and everyone is confined to Hell. After a series of speakers come forward, Beelzebub takes the floor, proposing that the devils work their mischief on God's new creations, the human race.

Notice that Satan has actually planted Beelzebub to propose such an idea--the whole "debate" is just a farce, allowing the other devils to think that they have a democratic voice. (In this devilish council Milton also critiques the human politics of his time). Beelzebub is trying to persuade his fellow devils to go along with Satan's plan: to use fraud, instead of open rebellion, to try to hurt God--and to do this by corrupting mankind, God's favored new creation. And while we know the result of this plan of "deep malice," Milton also notes the bright side: all of Satan's mischief will be in vain. One day, God will send Jesus Christ to redeem mankind, saving the human race from damnation in Hell. It is characteristic of the Christian universe that evil, while horrific by itself, is actually useful for achieving good ends. Milton will show how Satan's rebellious evil actually helps God and ensures God's plan.

If him by force he can destroy, or worse,
By some false guile pervert; and shall pervert;
For man will hearken to his glozing lies,
And easily transgress the sole command,
Sole pledge of his obedience: so will fall
He and his faithless progeny: whose fault?
Whose but his own? Ingrate, he had of me
All he could have; I made him just and right,
Sufficient to have stood, though free to fall.

Related Characters: God the Father (speaker), Satan, Adam
Page Number: 2.91-99
Explanation and Analysis:

In this Book, we transition from Hell to Heaven, and the contrast couldn't be clearer. God wields effortless authority over his angel followers, the setting is filled with light and music, and everything is also a little bit less interesting. Here, the angels ask God what will happen when the devils try to corrupt mankind. To everyone's surprise, God says that Satan will succeed: he will tempt Adam and Eve to disobey God.

The big question here is, why isn't God himself responsible for mankind's fall? If God is all-powerful and created the human race, and foresaw their fall, then isn't he liable for the corruption of his own creations? God responds that he created mankind with the gift of free will: mankind is "sufficient to have stood yet free to fall." Therefore, God isn't directly responsible for humans' decisions--he allows them to be free of all control, including his own.

Why does God endow mankind with free will? One could argue that he does so because free will allows human beings to achieve more and please God further. It's true that free will can be dangerous, since devils can tempt human beings into sin. And yet it's only through free will that humans can truly embrace God--they choose to do so, rather than being forced to.

This passage also brings up the important idea of predestination--if God can foresee what will happen, and states it now (and God is never wrong), then do Adam and Eve really have free will? Many of Milton's contemporaries, the Calvinists, believed wholly in predestination--that God has already chosen who goes to Hell and who goes to Heaven, and all human action is just the playing out of that predetermined plan. Milton doesn't buy this idea, however, as he emphasizes with the "free to fall" statement. God's foreknowledge can then be explained with the idea of time. In many versions of Christianity, God exists outside of time, and so he can see what will happen in the future, but it's not the future to him--all times exist at once in the scheme of divine eternity. Thus within their own concept of time, Adam and Eve have free will, but to God it's as if they've already chosen to sin.

Book 4 Quotes

Be then his love accursed, since love or hate,
To me alike, it deals eternal woe.
Nay cursed be thou; since against his thy will
Chose freely what it now so justly rues.
Me miserable! Which way shall I fly
Infinite wrath, and infinite despair?
Which way I fly is Hell; myself am Hell;
And in the lowest deep a lower deep
Still threat’ning to devour me opens wide,
To which the Hell I suffer seems a Heav’n.

Related Characters: Satan (speaker), God the Father
Page Number: 4.69-78
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Satan flies from Hell to Earth. As he travels, he thinks to himself about the misery that is his life now. In Heaven, Satan was happy to be a powerful angel--in Hell, however, Satan is tormented by constant misery; the misery of being hated by God and being the enemy of the universe itself. Satan goes on to say that he carries Hell with him wherever he goes--his bitterness and lust for power is now so intense that he is always miserable, even if he should fly back to Heaven itself.

In short, the passage shows Satan in the depths of despair. He's a glutton for authority--and God will never allow him to satisfy his appetite. As a result, Satan's only solace is to cause misery and pain to others, such as Adam and Eve.

And should I at your harmless innocence
Melt, as I do, yet public reason just,
Honour and empire with revenge enlarged,
By conquering this new world, compels me now
To do what else though damned I should abhor.

Related Characters: Satan (speaker), God the Father
Page Number: 4.388-392
Explanation and Analysis:

In this surprising passage, Satan has arrived in terrestrial paradise. He's stunned by the sight of Adam and Eve--he's never seen a human being before. Moreover, Satan finds the Garden of Eden, and Adam and Eve themselves, to be extremely beautiful. As he stares, Satan goes through inner torment: he realizes that, were he still an obedient angel, he would love the humans' world and try to nurture it, enjoying their beauty and innocence. Yet Satan refuses to allow his own sympathies to change his will. Instead, he resolves to do what he was sent to do: corrupt mankind and destroy this beautiful world.

The passage shows Satan in a somewhat sympathetic light: he's committed to evil yet instinctively still longs for good, and laments what his past actions have brought about. In his pride, however, he feels that he has no choice but to harden his heart and go on with his hateful plan. Milton thus suggests that evil isn't liberation from God's authority; rather, it's a prison of its own. Satan gets no pleasure from undermining paradise--it's a bitter burden for him.

Book 5 Quotes

Will ye submit your necks, and choose to bend
The supple knee? ye will not, if I trust
To know ye right, or if ye know yourselves
Natives and sons of Heav’n possessed before
By none, and if not equal all, yet free,
Equally free; for orders and degrees
Jar not with liberty, but well consist.
Who can in reason then or right assume
Monarchy over such as live by right
His equals, if in power and splendour less,
In freedom equal?

Related Characters: Satan (speaker)
Page Number: 5.787-797
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, narrated by Raphael to Adam, Satan assembles his angels and urges them to rebel against the divine authority of God. To do this, he makes a long speech in which he invokes the principles of equality, pride, and freedom. His speech is full of contradictions and hypocrisies, and yet it's also full of interesting points. Notice that Satan's language (freedom, equality, liberty) parallels the language of the European Enlightenment. Furthermore, Satan makes a surprisingly democratic argument, saying that no being should live under the ultimate authority of another being, even if that being is more powerful.

The argument is particularly surprising since Milton actually supported the rebellion of English people against the authority of the king of England--he favored the "commonwealth" of Cromwell over the monarchy of Charles I. Some people have interpreted the speech to mean that Milton himself subconsciously supported Satan's rebellion against God--he couldn't help casting Satan as a democratic crusader challenging a tyrant. Others have argued that Milton saw divine authority as entirely different from earthly authority, and believed that while it's right to depose kings because they are merely human, and don't deserve absolute power, God himself is the appropriate divine authority in the hierarchy of the universe, so it's entirely proper that he should rule absolutely.

Unjust thou say’st
Flatly unjust, to bind with laws the free,
And equal over equals to let reign,
One over all with unsucceeded power.
Shalt thou give law to God, shalt thou dispute
With him the points of liberty, who made
Thee what thou art, and formed the Powers of Heav’n
Such as he pleased, and circumscribed their being?

Related Characters: Abdiel (speaker), Satan
Page Number: 5.818-825
Explanation and Analysis:

Satan has assembled a band of followers to rebel against God, and tried to sway the angels with bold arguments about rebelling against tyranny. And yet there's one angel who disagrees with Satan: Abdiel. Abdiel tells Satan that he's being absurd for suggesting that he (Satan) has the right to rebel against the supreme authority of the universe, the being who created everyone, including Satan himself. This argument is similar to God's own argument in the Biblical book of Job. God afflicts Job, a righteous man, with all kinds of trials and tribulations, and Job finally cries out at his unjust treatment. God's ambiguous response is mostly to invoke his own power and wisdom--who is Job to question the being who created Job in the first place? What laws of justice or fairness can Job (or in this case Satan) invoke that God himself didn't create, and doesn't already embody perfectly?

The character of Abdiel also shows that (in Milton's universe at least) angels, like humans after them, have a degree of free will--they can choose to obey or disobey God. This makes Abdiel all the more admirable, in that he not only chooses freely to return to God, but goes against his leader and all his peers in doing so.

Book 9 Quotes

O foul descent! that I who erst contended
With Gods to sit the highest, am now constrained
Into a beast, and mixed with bestial slime,
This essence to incarnate and imbrute,
That to the heighth of Deity aspired…
Revenge, at first though sweet,
Bitter ere long back on itself recoils;
Let it; I reck not, so I light well aimed,
Since higher I fall short, on him who next
Provokes my envy, this new favourite
Of Heav’n, this man of clay, son of despite,
Whom us the more to spite his Maker raised
From dust: spite then with spite is best repaid.

Related Characters: Satan (speaker), Adam
Page Number: 9.163-178
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Satan transforms into a snake. He's come into the Garden of Eden to tempt Eve into disobeying God's authority and eating from the Tree of Knowledge. Satan feels great shame and self-hatred as he transforms into a snake, which he sees as a lowly, ugly beast--he remembers the time when he lived in Heaven and his body was beautiful, and when he even aspired to be equal to God himself. He's fallen a long, long way since that time: now, every second of his life is full of misery. Indeed, he's so miserable that his only pleasure is to cause misery to other.

Milton uses clever language to foreshadow Satan's own punishment. In the final line, Satan mentions dust--after tempting Eve, God punished snakes by condemning them to eat "dust." Furthermore, the word "spite" (echoing several times in the last few lines) recalls the hissing sound of the snake, reflecting Satan's transformation.

Queen of this universe, do not believe
Those rigid threats of death; ye shall not die:
How should ye? by the fruit? it gives you life
To knowledge. By the Threat’ner? look on me,
Me who have touched and tasted, yet both live,
And life more perfect have attained than Fate
Meant me, by vent’ring higher than my lot.
Shall that be shut to man, which to the beast
Is open? or will God incense his ire
For such a petty trespass, and not praise
Rather your dauntless virtue, whom the pain
Of death denounced, whatever thing death be…

Related Characters: Satan (speaker), God the Father, Eve
Related Symbols: The Fruit of the Tree of Knowledge
Page Number: 9.684-695
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Satan, disguised as a snake, tries to tempt Eve into eating from the Tree of Knowledge. The snake uses a series of arguments. It claims that it can talk because it ate of the Tree of Knowledge, and the fruit made it wise. The snake also suggests that eating from the tree will elevate Eve's status in life, making her more divine and majestic. Finally, the snake insists that the Tree will not, as God had claimed, make Eve die--the snake has eaten from the tree, and it's clearly not dead. In fact, the snake says that God will praise Eve for eating the fruit, rather than punish her, because eating the fruit shows that she is brave enough to risk death, "whatever thing death be."

One thing to notice about the snake's arguments is that they suggest two opposing sets of morals. One set of morals favors bravery, heroism, striving, and daring uncertainty--one could call this a romantic or chivalric set of values. The other set of values (which the snake criticizes) favors obedience, loyalty, and trust in one's station in life. In the end, the first set of values is just more fun: Eve, who's been shown to be ambitious and curious, wants above her allotted station in life, and this is the sin for which she's ultimately punished.

O Eve, in evil hour thou didst give ear
To that false worm, of whomsoever taught
To counterfeit man’s voice, true in our Fall,
False in promised rising; since our eyes
Opened we find indeed, and find we know
Both good and evil, good lost, and evil got,
Bad fruit of knowledge, if this be to know…

Related Characters: Adam (speaker), Satan, Eve
Related Symbols: The Fruit of the Tree of Knowledge
Page Number: 9.1067-1073
Explanation and Analysis:

After Adam and Eve have both eaten from the Tree of Knowledge, they at first feel excited and pleased with themselves, and they have lustful sex for the first time. But afterwards, they come to realize that the fruit of the Tree has condemned them to a life of misery: they're aware of sin and evil now, and they're ashamed to be alive. A sure sign of their sinful nature is that they immediately begin to argue amongst themselves. Here, for instance, Adam claims that Eve has destroyed him by tempting him to eat from the Tree--he blames Eve for listening to the snake.

It's ironic that Adam and Eve have begun arguing so forcefully, since only a few hours before, Adam had claimed that he and Eve were "one." Milton shows how feeble and nonsensical such declarations of love really are: Adam and Eve are not, in fact, "one" at all anymore--their sin, instead of romantically bringing them together, has only torn them apart.

Book 10 Quotes

Fair daughter, and thou son and grandchild both,
High proof ye now have giv’n to be the race
Of Satan (for I glory in the name,
Antagonist of Heav’n’s Almighty King)
Amply have merited of me, of all
Th’ infernal empire, that so near Heav’n’s door
Triumphal with triumphal act have met,
Mine with this glorious work, and made one realm
Hell and this world, one realm, one continent
Of easy thoroughfare.

Related Characters: Satan (speaker), Sin, Death
Page Number: 10.384-393
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Satan has returned to Hell, and encounters his two incestuous offspring, Sin and Death, who have been busy building a bridge from Hell to Earth. Satan proudly tells his children that he has successfully corrupted the entire human race, allowing Sin and Death a "free reign" on Earth.

The passage shows Satan at the height of his power: he thinks that he's succeeded in defeating (or at least wounding)  God by tempting Eve and Adam into sin. As a result, Satan believes, Death and Sin are free to further lead Adam and Eve down the path of evil, and make "Hell and this world, one realm" (an echo and perversion of God's earlier plan to make Earth and Heaven one). He even fully accepts the name Satan (which means "Adversary") for the first time--it's not his original angelic name, but one that he now embraces, as he thinks himself as a worthy antagonist to God.

Yet even here at the height of his success, Satan's victory rings hollow: he's spread misery and pain to others, but done nothing to alleviate his own. Indeed, he won't be allowed to glory in his "victory" for long, as God will further punish and humiliate him and the other devils.

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Satan Character Timeline in Paradise Lost

The timeline below shows where the character Satan appears in Paradise Lost. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book 1
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...answers himself that they were deceived into “foul revolt” by the “infernal Serpent,” who is Satan. Satan was an angel who aspired to overthrow God, and started a civil war in... (full context)
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The poem then focuses on Satan as he lies dazed in a lake of fire that is totally dark. Next to... (full context)
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...and he may have let the rebellious angels live just so they could suffer forever. Satan doesn’t contradict this, but he remains resolved to “ever do ill” and try to pervert... (full context)
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Milton describes the terrible size and appearance of Satan’s body, which is like a whale or a Greek Titan floating on the waves. Slowly... (full context)
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As they fly Satan laments the desolation of Hell as compared to the glory of Heaven, but he accepts... (full context)
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Satan takes up his terrible armor, and he calls to his legions to join him on... (full context)
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...violent god who will corrupt places like Sodom. These fallen angels are given hope by Satan’s strong appearance, and they flock to him. They are still dressed in their war gear... (full context)
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Satan is encouraged by the sight of his glorious army, which is far more magnificent than... (full context)
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At Satan’s words the rebel angels all draw their flaming swords and reaffirm their defiance against Heaven.... (full context)
Book 2
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Satan addresses his armies from a magnificent golden throne. He claims that Heaven is not yet... (full context)
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Beelzebub then proposes an “easier enterprise” – he returns to Satan’s rumor that God planned to create a new world. This world will be filled with... (full context)
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...a long silence, as all the devils are afraid to take this “dreadful voyage.” Finally Satan grandiosely volunteers himself, promising to undergo all the hardships of the journey and earn his... (full context)
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Satan commands the other devils to work at making Hell “more tolerable” while he is away,... (full context)
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Meanwhile Satan flies off towards the gates of Hell, and sees that there are actually nine gates... (full context)
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Satan burns with anger and the two are about to do battle, but the “snaky sorceress”... (full context)
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Satan, who seems to have forgotten all of this, now speaks more kindly to Sin and... (full context)
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...Chaos personified rules this realm, the “dark materials” that God used to create the universe. Satan spreads his wings and leaps into the abyss, but he immediately starts to fall. He... (full context)
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Satan flies over the strange, “boggy” landscape and then hears a great cacophony of noise. He... (full context)
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Satan moves onward, but his path grows very difficult and dangerous. Milton compares it to the... (full context)
Book 3
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...Together they watch Adam and Eve in the “happy garden” of Eden, and they see Satan flying across the gulf between Hell and Earth. God sees not only this but also... (full context)
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God says that Adam and Eve will listen to Satan’s “glozing lies” and disobey God, leading to their “fall.” Though God foresees all this, he... (full context)
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...in his punishment of mankind, as Adam and Eve will be led into disobedience by Satan instead of on their own. For Satan and his angels, however, there will be no... (full context)
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The scene then returns to Satan as he approaches Earth. He lands in what is now China and walks about, but... (full context)
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...about, with angels descending and ascending. In this pre-Fall world Heaven directly overlooks the Earth. Satan flies over the gate and climbs a little way up the stairs. He look down... (full context)
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Satan lands on the surface of the sun and Milton describes its magical substance, like liquid... (full context)
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Satan approaches Uriel and addresses him respectfully, saying that he has just come down from Heaven... (full context)
Book 4
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...by again lamenting the Fall of Man, and wishing that Adam and Eve had escaped Satan’s “mortal snare.” Meanwhile Satan lands on a mountain near Eden and looks upon the glory... (full context)
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Satan briefly considers what would happen if he repented and subdued himself to God, but he... (full context)
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Finally embracing his fallen state and doom of eternal misery, Satan decides to pursue the only path he perceives as left to him – he will... (full context)
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Satan then comes to the border of Paradise, which is surrounded by a high wall of... (full context)
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Satan looks down on Paradise, the Garden of Eden, and examines its lushness and geography. Next... (full context)
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...predators like lions and bears are tame and vegetarian. The sun begins to set and Satan is speechless at the beauty and innocence of these creatures, but then he begins an... (full context)
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Satan experiences new grief and envy, and he feels he could have loved these humans. He... (full context)
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As Satan approaches, the man, whose name is Adam, speaks to the woman, Eve. Adam says that... (full context)
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Eve finishes her speech and she and Adam embrace and kiss. Satan looks away in envy but then is strengthened in his resolve, as it seems unfair... (full context)
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...not last much longer. Meanwhile Gabriel sends his angels to scour Paradise and look for Satan. Two of them, Ithuriel and Zephon, find Satan in the shape of a toad, whispering... (full context)
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Ithuriel and Zephon don’t recognize Satan at first, which wounds Satan’s pride, and he mocks them as lesser angels. Zephon then... (full context)
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Gabriel recognizes Satan and confronts him, asking why he left Hell and entered Eden, and is now disturbing... (full context)
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Gabriel calls Satan a liar and laments how far the once-great Archangel has fallen. He threatens to drag... (full context)
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...which God ponders the outcomes of all events. On one side is the result of Satan staying and fighting, and on the other side is the result of Satan running away.... (full context)
Book 5
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The scene shifts to Heaven, where God calls the Archangel Raphael and tells him that Satan has entered Paradise and is trying to corrupt Adam and Eve. God does not want... (full context)
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...of the most powerful (if not the most powerful) Archangels, he who is now called Satan. That night during the heavenly twilight this Archangel could not sleep, for he was tormented... (full context)
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That same night Satan spoke to his second-in-command (now called Beelzebub) and ordered him to assemble all the angels... (full context)
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God and his Son watched all this happen, though Satan thought he was being secret. God was pleased at this opportunity to display his omnipotence... (full context)
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Satan called his armies before him and delivered a speech, saying that they had been unjustly... (full context)
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Satan was then interrupted by the angel Abdiel, who alone of all the legions objected to... (full context)
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Satan argued that he could not remember when he was created by God, so he must... (full context)
Book 6
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...Michael the leader of the army of Heaven (which was fairly equal in number to Satan’s army), with Gabriel as his second-in-command, and God instructed them to drive the rebel angels... (full context)
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...army of Heaven then flew off to battle arranged in perfect ranks, and they met Satan’s army, and the two sides lined up and faced each other. Raphael comments on how... (full context)
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Abdiel condemned Satan for his disobedience and defiance of omnipotence, and Satan responded with insults of Abdiel’s cowardice... (full context)
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...not God limited the strength of each angel and arranged their strategies of battle. Finally Satan fought his way through to Michael. (full context)
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Before engaging each other Michael and Satan traded insults, with Michael promising to banish Satan to Hell and Satan to “turn this... (full context)
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Satan bled “nectarous humour” from his wound, and the rebel angels protected him from Michael until... (full context)
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Night fell and both armies rested and regrouped. Satan, already healed, gathered his army for a council. He encouraged them with their realization that... (full context)
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...cause the good angels pain, as pain is “perfect misery, the worst / Of evils.” Satan answered with an idea of mining “materials dark and crude” from under the ground, which... (full context)
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The next morning the armies faced off again, and Satan revealed his cannons with a sarcastic speech about sending “proposals” of peace. The good angels... (full context)
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Satan and Belial then made more sarcastic, punning speeches, feeling assured of victory, until the good... (full context)
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...into the abyss, but this was less terrifying than the Son’s wrath behind them, so Satan and his followers flung themselves into the pit. (full context)
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Satan and his angels fell for nine days, at last landing in Hell, where they now... (full context)
Book 7
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...“appetite” for knowledge requires temperance, but then he begins his story: After the Son drove Satan and his angels from Heaven, God decided to create a new race of creatures and... (full context)
Book 9
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...old or the world starts decaying with “cold / Climate.” The scene then turns to Satan, who has been hiding on the dark side of the Earth for seven days after... (full context)
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Satan studies all the creatures of Eden, considering which one he should disguise himself in, and... (full context)
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Satan finally controls his thoughts and reaffirms his purpose to bring evil out of God’s good,... (full context)
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Satan further laments how far he has fallen, from the highest Archangel to the “mazy folds”... (full context)
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...approve of this idea, as he worries that the two will be more susceptible to Satan’s temptation if they are alone, and in times of danger the woman’s place is “by... (full context)
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Eve responds that she “overheard” Raphael’s warning about Satan, but she wishes to prove herself should Satan attack her alone. She also recognizes that... (full context)
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Eve is slightly put out by this, and argues that if they defend themselves against Satan alone, they will gain “double honour,” and that surely God would not make their happiness... (full context)
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Eve replies that the proud Satan will surely seek out Adam first, so she is in little danger. Then she departs... (full context)
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Meanwhile Satan has been seeking out the pair, hoping but not expecting to find them separated. He... (full context)
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When Eve notices him Satan speaks to her, praising her beauty and grace and calling her a “goddess amongst gods.”... (full context)
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...though she says the snake is “overpraising” her, she asks him where this tree grows. Satan offers to show her, and Eve follows him the short distance to the Tree of... (full context)
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Satan raises himself up like “some orator renowned / In Athens or free Rome” and then... (full context)
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Satan further says that God has forbidden the fruit so as to keep Adam and Eve... (full context)
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...at the fruit, which seems especially perfect and delicious to her, and she thinks about Satan’s persuasive words. She muses that the fruit must be very powerful if God has forbidden... (full context)
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Satan immediately slinks back into the undergrowth. Eve is overcome by the delicious fruit and she... (full context)
Book 10
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...guards of Eden also know, and they fly up to Heaven to ask God how Satan re-entered Paradise, as they guarded it as best they could. God tells them that they... (full context)
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...serpent to forever crawl on its belly as a punishment for being the vehicle of Satan. He ordains that Adam and Eve’s offspring will bruise the serpent’s head, and the serpent... (full context)
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...jumps slightly back in time, as Sin and Death wait at the Hell’s gates where Satan left them. Sin suddenly senses that Satan has succeeded in his task, and she convinces... (full context)
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Just as they finish their work Satan greets them at the edge of Paradise, and he is delighted at the bridge they... (full context)
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Satan ends his speech by telling his followers to fly up to Earth and “enter now... (full context)
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...to take this in a metaphorical sense – that one of Eve’s offspring will defeat Satan. Therefore if Eve kills herself, Satan will escape his punishment. (full context)
Book 11
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...of the prophecy about bruising the serpent’s head, saying that she will have revenge on Satan by being the “Mother of all things living,” and so the ancestor of the one... (full context)
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...almost a whole hemisphere of the Earth – Milton compares it to the hill where Satan will tempt Jesus by offering him all of Earth’s kingdoms. Michael drops water from the... (full context)
Book 12
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...overjoyed at this news and he asks Michael to describe the Messiah’s glorious battle with Satan, but Michael says that they will not fight with violence – instead the Son becomes... (full context)