The Help

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The novel’s antagonist, Hilly is on the surface the ideal of the Southern housewife: loyal to her husband, adored by her friends and neighbors, and loving to her two children. But underneath the surface, Hilly harbors viciously racist beliefs that spur her to treat the black women in the novel as if they were subhuman. Hilly jeopardizes Minny’s financial security by spreading vindictive rumors about her, also uses her influence in the white community to have her own maid, Yule May, sentenced to four years in prison just for stealing one of her rings. As conniving as she is heartless, Hilly influences the other white women to accept her beliefs, spearheading a campaign to pass a bill that would require every Mississippi household to have a separate bathroom for black domestic workers. In the end, Minny takes revenge on Hilly by including in Skeeter’s book the story about feeding her the “special ingredient” pie.

Hilly Holbrook Quotes in The Help

The The Help quotes below are all either spoken by Hilly Holbrook or refer to Hilly Holbrook. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Racism Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Berkley Books edition of The Help published in 2009.
Chapter 8 Quotes

Aibileen just stood there and I wished I wasn’t in the room. Please, I thought, please don’t say thank you.
“Yes ma’am.” Aibileen opened a drawer and reached inside, but Hilly kept looking at her. It was so obvious what she wanted.
Another second passed with no one moving. Hilly cleared her throat and finally Aibileen lowered her head. “Thank you, ma’am,” she whispered. She walked back into the kitchen. It’s no wonder she doesn’t want to talk to me.

Related Characters: Eugenia “Skeeter” Phelan (speaker), Aibileen Clark, Hilly Holbrook
Page Number: 129
Explanation and Analysis:

While Hilly is at Elizabeth's house one day, Hilly tells Aibileen that her husband was responsible for the construction of Aibileen's bathroom. After Hilly describes this, she clearly waits for Aibileen to say thank you, creating the silence and social tension present in this passage. Hilly acts as if Aibileen's bathroom is a gift (a form of "help" for the help), ignoring this bathroom's other implications: that black women are "dirty" or disease-ridden and that racially-segregated spaces are more suitable than integrated ones.

Skeeter knows that this form of help from the Holbrooks is hypocritical, but again her view of social degradation becomes about Skeeter's own emotions. Skeeter reflects that Aibileen likely doesn't want to talk to her because of her friendship with Hilly. Of course, Aibileen could also not wish to talk to Skeeter because of Skeeter's own actions. Earlier, Skeeter attempted to bribe Aibileen into participating in her project. Skeeter tried to give Aibileen an envelope of money, as thanks for her help with the Miss Myrna letters but also as an incentive to encourage Aibileen to share her story as a maid. As we've seen earlier, even Skeeter is hypocritical; she'd like to help AIbileen but she'd also like to help herself.


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Chapter 13 Quotes

I realize, like a shell cracking open in my head, there’s no difference between these government laws and Hilly building Aibileen a bathroom in the garage, except ten minutes’ worth of signatures in the state capital.

Related Characters: Eugenia “Skeeter” Phelan (speaker), Aibileen Clark, Hilly Holbrook
Page Number: 203
Explanation and Analysis:

When Skeeter browses at the library and searches for books that might help her describe the lives of black domestic workers, she discovers  a booklet which details the "Jim Crow Laws of the South." She reads a few pages, "mesmerized" by the factual and direct wording of these laws, which everyone seems to implicitly know but never openly discusses. 

Skeeter makes herself stop reading because she feels this material is off topic; she is writing about maids instead of Southern legislation. However, Skeeter then realizes that "there's no difference" between these simple, matter-of-fact laws that enforce segregation and less direct attempts to separate individual blacks and whites (such as Hilly's attempt to separate Aibileen from Miss Leefolt's regular bathroom). All of the previous, more personal events of The Help are here connected to the larger legislative forces at work in the 1960s.

Chapter 14 Quotes

I feel my lip curling. A course we different! Everbody know colored people and white people ain’t the same. But we still just people! Shoot, I even been hearing Jesus had colored skin living out there in the desert. I press my lips together.

Related Characters: Aibileen Clark (speaker), Hilly Holbrook, Elizabeth Leefolt
Page Number: 218
Explanation and Analysis:

One afternoon, Hilly brings her children over to Miss Leefolt's and, while the children are playing, Hilly tries to prod Aibileen into saying that she would prefer segregated schools. When Aibileen refuses to comply with Hilly's implicit command, Hilly responds that "colored people and white people are just so... different."

Now, Aibileen must revert back to her silence; she could only briefly stand up to Hilly. Turning quiet, she reflects that white and black folks are indeed different, but are both "just people." This quote essentially captures the (rather over-simplistic) "moral" of the book—that if everyone would fully recognize that blacks and whites are both "just people," racism would end.

Furthermore, it's likely that Jesus—the supposed center of these religious white women's lives—himself "had colored skin." When Aibileen comments on this, she draws our attention to other characters' hypocritical practice of religion. Religion is a complicated force in The Help: we see Aibileen selflessly use prayer to intercede for other members of her community; we see Skeeter pretend to participate in religious gatherings or initiatives in order to disguise her true activities (while she works on her book with Aibileen and Minny); and we see Miss Hilly wholeheartedly believe she is a Christian, despite her attempts to dehumanize the black individuals around her.

But this bag is different. Even what would fit me in that paper sack, I can’t wear. Can’t give to my friends either. Ever piece in that bag—the culotte pants, the shirt with the Peter Pan collar, the pink jacket with the gravy stain on it, even the socks—they all got the letters H.W.H. sewn in. Red thread, pretty little cursive letters. I reckon Yule May had to sew them letters. Wearing those, I’d feel like I’s personal-owned property a Hilly W. Holbrook.

Related Characters: Aibileen Clark (speaker), Hilly Holbrook, Yule May
Page Number: 220
Explanation and Analysis:

While Aibileen sits at her kitchen table, a cockroach scuttles under the unopened bag of clothes which Miss Hilly gave her a few months ago. Although Aibileen often uses clothes which other white women similarly give to her, she knows she could never bring herself to wear a piece of Hilly's donated clothing. The clothes—with their "red thread, pretty little cursive letters"—represent Hilly herself, and indeed have all been marked with her initials, so that Aibileen would feels as if she was almost branded with Hilly's "ownership" if she wore the clothes (a poignant echo of how slavery has ended in the South, but institutionalized oppression has not). With her put-together, elegant appearance, beautiful looking children, and veneer of politeness, Hilly seems to embody the pretense of well-meaning Southern society.  

Yet, Aibileen knows what lies under Hilly's appearances. She sees how Hilly's greed for control extends into the way she treats black people as individuals who must obey her demands (as"personal-owned property"). Hilly represents the South that Aibileen attempts to stand up against, through her writing. "Miss Hilly" was Aibileen's reason for helping Skeeter with this project, and when Aibileen refuses to use or even unpack the clothes which Miss Hilly gave her, we see that Aibileen is rising against Hilly in whatever ways she can.

After while, my mind done drifted to where I wish it wouldn’t. I reckon I know pretty well what would happen if the white ladies found out we was writing about them, telling the truth a what they really like. Womens, they ain’t like men. A woman ain’t gone beat you with a stick. Miss Hilly wouldn’t pull no pistol on me. Miss Leefolt wouldn’t come burn my house down.
No, white womens like to keep they hands clean. They got a shiny little set a tools they use, sharp as witches’ fingernails, tidy and laid out neat, like the picks on a dentist tray. They gone take they time with em.

Related Characters: Aibileen Clark (speaker), Hilly Holbrook, Elizabeth Leefolt
Page Number: 220
Explanation and Analysis:

Earlier that afternoon, Aibileen heard Miss Hilly tell Elizabeth "I read it," in regards to something in Skeeter's satchel. Aibileen knows that Hilly might have read her stories, but there is nothing she can do in this situation; she can't even call Skeeter because it would be too difficult to explain why a black woman is calling Skeeter's house. Aibileen can only think about the possible repercussions of her stories. She knows that, if white women such as Hilly or Elizabeth found out, they would use indirect means ("a shiny little set a tools") such as gossip, firing, and manipulation to ensure that Aibileen would lose her life as she knew it—her job, home, and stability. 

As Aibileen here describes, and Minny's difficulty finding a job revealed, a white woman can be just as much of a cruel, racist segregationist as her man, although she uses less obvious means. These white women gain their unfortunate power because of their ability to hold a grudge and "take their time." Because women with maids are typically women in well-off homes who lack major economic worries, they can afford to take whatever time they need to fully satisfy their grudge and destroy the lives of those who are powerless. 

Chapter 21 Quotes

“It is my job, Skeeter! You know well as I do, people won’t buy so much as a slice of pound cake from an organization that harbors racial integrationists!”
“Hilly.” I just need to hear her say it. “Just who is all that pound cake money being raised for, anyway?”
She rolls her eyes. “The Poor Starving Children of Africa?”
I wait for her to catch the irony of this, that she’ll send money to colored people overseas, but not across town.

Related Characters: Eugenia “Skeeter” Phelan (speaker), Hilly Holbrook (speaker)
Page Number: 331
Explanation and Analysis:

This scene occurs moments before Skeeter calls Hilly a hypocrite for the first time and threatens to tell Hilly's hero Genevieve von Hapsburg (the national League president) about Hilly's hypocrisy. Here, Hilly is enraged that Skeeter has not included the Home Help Sanitation Initiative in any weekly League newsletter over the past five months. Hilly is also upset that Skeeter's blossoming integrationist beliefs could harm the League's image. However, Skeeter is also upset. Stuart broke up with her, she is fed up with Hilly's only superficially charitable works, and she is stressed about her mother's declining health. With all of these factors in play, finally Hilly and Skeeter's friendship begins to erupt. 

Only in this scene of anger and conflict does Skeeter so directly address a fundamental theme of The Help—the tension between help and hypocrisy. Although Skeeter has been bothered by Hilly's hypocritical ways in the past, as she heard Hilly make Aibileen say "thank you" for her garage bathroom or saw Hilly disguise her social climbing with the veneer of philanthropy for struggling communities, Skeeter confronts Hilly when her own life is already in shambles (and, for instance, she does not need Hilly to introduce her to Stuart anymore). This, of course, does not take away from the truth underlying Skeeter's comments; Hilly may not understand the "irony" Skeeter pinpoints, but the reader certainly should.

Chapter 22 Quotes

“She needs to learn that she can’t carry on this way. I mean, around us it’s one thing, but around some other people, she’s going to get in big trouble.”
“It’s true. There are some racists in this town,” Miss Leefolt say. Miss Hilly nod her head, “Oh, they’re out there.”

Related Characters: Hilly Holbrook (speaker), Elizabeth Leefolt (speaker), Eugenia “Skeeter” Phelan
Related Symbols: Bathrooms
Page Number: 343
Explanation and Analysis:

After Skeeter edits a newsletter announcement so that members of the League drop off old toilets instead of coats at Hilly's house, Hilly removes Skeeter from bridge club and discusses her other plans against Skeeter with Elizabeth. According to Hilly, Skeeter could "get in big trouble" for carrying around the Jim Crow laws pamphlet, as there are "some racists in this town," as Elizabeth says, who might more severely punish Skeeter.

Here, we see that Hilly's hypocritical kind of "help" extends to her former friends as well; she frames Skeeter's punishments as gifts that will help Skeeter learn an essential lesson. We also see Elizabeth and Hilly describe racism in terms of particular individuals who are "racists." These "racists" perform physical actions that display their beliefs, whereas Hilly and Elizabeth do not. This contrast—between physical violence and more psychological and social realities—is what allows Elizabeth and Hilly to (hypocritically) maintain their own self-identity as well-meaning individuals.

Chapter 34 Quotes

I walk out the back door, to the terrible sound a Mae Mobley crying again. I start down the driveway, crying too, knowing how much I’m on miss Mae Mobley, praying her mama can show her more love. But at the same time feeling, in a way, that I’m free…Freer than Miss Leefolt, who so locked up in her own head she don’t even recognize herself when she read it. And freer than Miss Hilly. That woman gone spend the rest a her life trying to convince people she didn’t eat that pie. I think about Yule May setting in jail. Cause Miss Hilly, she in her own jail, but with a lifelong term.

Related Characters: Aibileen Clark (speaker), Hilly Holbrook, Elizabeth Leefolt, Mae Mobley Leefolt, Yule May
Related Symbols: Minny’s “Special Ingredient” Pie
Page Number: 521
Explanation and Analysis:

After Hilly accuses Aibileen of stealing silver and makes Elizabeth fire her, Aibileen leaves the Leefolt's home for the last time. Like Minny, who recently decided to leave her abusive husband, Aibileen now feels free to decide her future. She is no longer stuck caring for others' children; instead of providing Mae Mobley with daily love, she will only hope that Mae Mobley will experience such love in the future. Aibileen's storytelling has cost her a former way of life, but it provides her with the internal power to determine a more fulfilling future. 

Aibileen recognizes how her storytelling simultaneously removed some of Hilly's freedom; Hilly will forever try to convince others that she did not "eat that pie." The truth of Aibileen's stories set her free, but Hilly's willingness to engage in lies makes her lack freedom, "in her own jail ... with a lifelong term." As The Help closes, we see Hilly as a kind of chained figure, no longer the character with the most authority and control.

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Hilly Holbrook Character Timeline in The Help

The timeline below shows where the character Hilly Holbrook appears in The Help. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
Racism Theme Icon
Gender and the Home  Theme Icon
...day, Miss Leefolt holds a luncheon for her friends Miss Eugenia “Skeeter” Phelan and Miss Hilly Holbrook. Both women are also twenty-three. Miss Hilly’s elderly mother, Miss Walters, also arrives. Miss... (full context)
Racism Theme Icon
Gender and the Home  Theme Icon
Aibileen serves the women food and overhears Miss Hilly accuse her mother’s maid Minny Jackson, Aibileen’s best friend, of stealing family heirlooms. Miss Hilly... (full context)
Racism Theme Icon
After Miss Hilly and Miss Walters leave, Aibileen finds Miss Skeeter waiting for her in the kitchen. She... (full context)
Chapter 2
Racism Theme Icon
Help vs. Hypocrisy Theme Icon
...deaf and crazy employer, Miss Walters. Aibileen sits beside Minny and warns her that Miss Hilly complained about her. Offended by Hilly’s accusation, Minny threatens to give Hilly “a piece a... (full context)
Racism Theme Icon
...spend on food and other expenses every week. Minny calls and tells her that Miss Hilly is putting her mother into a nursing home so she has to find a new... (full context)
Racism Theme Icon
Gender and the Home  Theme Icon
Minny calls Aibileen at work and tells her that Miss Hilly is telling the other white women that she’s a thief. Minny says she’s never going... (full context)
Chapter 5
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...jumps back in time to Skeeter’s perspective on the day of the bridge game when Hilly brought up the bathroom bill. After the game, Skeeter drives home to her family’s cotton... (full context)
Racism Theme Icon
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Hilly calls and says she’s set Skeeter up on a date with her husband’s cousin, Stuart... (full context)
Chapter 8
Racism Theme Icon
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Help vs. Hypocrisy Theme Icon
...two hours for the product to take effect, she remembers going to Elizabeth’s house with Hilly. When Aibileen had brought them coffee, Hilly asked Aibileen demeaning, rhetorical questions about the bathroom... (full context)
Chapter 9
Gender and the Home  Theme Icon
On the day of the double date with Stuart Whitworth and Hilly and her husband William, Skeeter straightens her hair and buys a nice black dress. She... (full context)
Gender and the Home  Theme Icon
Skeeter meets up with Hilly and her husband at their home. Stuart is already there, two drinks in. He’s handsome... (full context)
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After dinner, the four of them drive back to Hilly’s where William asks Skeeter to drive the drunk Stuart home. Before they get into the... (full context)
Racism Theme Icon
Writing, Storytelling, and Freedom Theme Icon
...the interview and explains that she changed her mind by saying only two words: Miss Hilly. Hearing the bitterness in Aibileen’s voice, Skeeter thinks of Hilly’s bathroom bill and all the... (full context)
Chapter 10
Racism Theme Icon
Gender and the Home  Theme Icon
...saw a picture of Johnny and realized that he was the man who dumped Miss Hilly in college. Minny realizes Miss Hilly must still be jealous and must have told the... (full context)
Chapter 12
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Social Class  Theme Icon
Help vs. Hypocrisy Theme Icon
Writing, Storytelling, and Freedom Theme Icon
The following day, Skeeter plays bridge with Elizabeth and Hilly at Elizabeth’s. Elizabeth announces that she is pregnant and that the baby is due in... (full context)
Chapter 13
Racism Theme Icon
Help vs. Hypocrisy Theme Icon
...whites from blacks. Skeeter realizes that there is no real difference between official laws and Hilly’s racist attitude about separate bathrooms. She steals the book because she can’t check it out... (full context)
Racism Theme Icon
Help vs. Hypocrisy Theme Icon
...Skeeter brings a satchel that contains the stolen book and her notes from the interviews. Hilly is telling the other women to donate canned goods for the “Poor Starving Children of... (full context)
Gender and the Home  Theme Icon
When Skeeter joins the group of women surrounding Hilly, the women suddenly bombard Skeeter with questions about if the rumors are true that she’s... (full context)
Racism Theme Icon
That day when Skeeter arrives home, Hilly calls to tell her that she left her satchel at the meeting but that it’s... (full context)
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When Hilly opens the door Skeeter can tell by her friend’s expression that she’s already peeked through... (full context)
Chapter 14
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Gender and the Home  Theme Icon
On a hot March 1963 day, Miss Leefolt and Miss Hilly watch their children play in a plastic kid’s pool at the Leefolt’s. Miss Leefolt is... (full context)
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Help vs. Hypocrisy Theme Icon
Miss Hilly turns away from Aibileen and starts telling Miss Leefolt that her husband is running for... (full context)
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At her home, Aibileen sees a bag of old clothing Miss Hilly gave her, ones she’ll never wear because Hilly’s initials are stitched into the lining. Wearing... (full context)
Racism Theme Icon
Gender and the Home  Theme Icon
Aibileen tries to write down her prayers, but she cannot stop thinking about what Hilly would do if she found out about the book. Aibileen thinks about how women take... (full context)
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Writing, Storytelling, and Freedom Theme Icon
Skeeter calls Aibileen and tells her about Hilly going through her satchel. Aibileen responds that she already knew that something was up. Skeeter... (full context)
Chapter 15
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Social Class  Theme Icon
A few days later, Miss Hilly invites Miss Leefolt and her child to the fancy country club. Miss Leefolt brings Aibileen... (full context)
Racism Theme Icon
Help vs. Hypocrisy Theme Icon
...the club, Miss Skeeter is playing tennis and comes over to Miss Leefolt and Miss Hilly. Skeeter tries to start a conversation, but Hilly is cold towards her, eventually blurting out... (full context)
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Trying to mend things with Hilly, Skeeter flatters her intelligence, saying that if she were up to anything sinister, Hilly would... (full context)
Chapter 16
Racism Theme Icon
...for Medgar Evers. Aibileen sits behind Yule May, a college-educated maid who works for Miss Hilly. Aibileen hasn’t asked Yule May to contribute her stories because anyone attached to Miss Hilly... (full context)
Chapter 19
Racism Theme Icon
...the first time. When Skeeter’s mother is out of earshot, Pascagoula whispers to Skeeter that Hilly’s maid, Yule May, has agreed to be interviewed for the book. (full context)
Racism Theme Icon
...face picking one over the other so she decided to steal an ugly ring from Hilly, one she never wore, to pay for the last part of the tuition. When Hilly... (full context)
Racism Theme Icon
Gender and the Home  Theme Icon
Help vs. Hypocrisy Theme Icon
...put both of her boys through college. Aibileen tells Skeeter how Yule May first asked Hilly for a loan but she refused, saying charity shouldn’t go to those “well and able.”... (full context)
Chapter 21
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At a League meeting, Hilly tells Skeeter she wants the ad about her bathroom initiative in this week’s journal or... (full context)
Help vs. Hypocrisy Theme Icon
Writing, Storytelling, and Freedom Theme Icon
Sitting at her desk at home, Skeeter feels ashamed while she types up Hilly’s ad. She worries what Constantine would think of her now. (full context)
Chapter 22
Racism Theme Icon
Gender and the Home  Theme Icon
Social Class  Theme Icon
...party, which Aibileen wasn’t invited to, Miss Leefolt receives an irate phone call from Miss Hilly. Miss Leefolt rushes out of the house and Aibileen and Mae Mobley follow. When they... (full context)
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Later at Miss Leefolt’s, Miss Hilly shows her Skeeter’s Jim Crow book and says they have to stop whatever integrationist plans... (full context)
Chapter 23
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...more help. She does say that Celia and her husband should attend the Benefit. Miss Hilly comes over and sells two tickets to Celia, saying she should buy ten for all... (full context)
Chapter 24
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Celia acts normally around Minny, which gives Minny the hope that Hilly hasn’t contacted her yet. In the kitchen, they suddenly see a naked white man in... (full context)
Racism Theme Icon
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...– both the ones between whites and blacks and those between Celia and people like Hilly. Aibileen says that the line between black and white people is imaginary and that Minny... (full context)
Racism Theme Icon
Gender and the Home  Theme Icon
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...advice, Minny tells her it’s because they think she’s a white trash hick who stole Hilly’s boyfriend by getting pregnant. Misunderstanding what Minny is saying, Celia mistakenly thinks that if she... (full context)
Chapter 25
Gender and the Home  Theme Icon
Social Class  Theme Icon
...and Minny are in the kitchen working and Skeeter is standing silently against a wall. Hilly has made sure that everyone will shun Skeeter in revenge for putting toilets on her... (full context)
Social Class  Theme Icon
During the silent auction for the Poor Starving Children of Africa fund, Hilly wins Minny’s famous chocolate-custard pie. For some reason, Hilly seems distressed that she won the... (full context)
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The music suddenly cuts when Celia tells Hilly that Johnny never cheated on her, that she and Johnny only slept together after he... (full context)
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At the end of the night, Hilly’s mother, Miss Walters, comes over and says she was the one who bid on the... (full context)
Chapter 26
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...to watch over Celia while he’s away. While cleaning, Minny sees an opened letter from Hilly, stating that Celia can give the two hundred dollars she owes her for the ripped... (full context)
Racism Theme Icon
Gender and the Home  Theme Icon
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Minny decides to tell Celia about what happened with Hilly and the pie, hoping it will make Celia see that Hilly is a cruel person... (full context)
Racism Theme Icon
...home, bakes a chocolate pie, and then returns to the house and gives it to Hilly, who thinks it’s a peace offering. Hilly has two big slices. When Miss Walters asks... (full context)
Racism Theme Icon
Gender and the Home  Theme Icon
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Writing, Storytelling, and Freedom Theme Icon
...mimosa tree she hates. At the kitchen table, Minny sees a check made out to Hilly for two hundred dollars with a note that says, “For Two-Slice Hilly.” (full context)
Chapter 27
Writing, Storytelling, and Freedom Theme Icon
...the best way of telling her. A couple of days later, at a League meeting, Hilly initiates a vote to elect a new editor for the newsletter. No one votes for... (full context)
Racism Theme Icon
Writing, Storytelling, and Freedom Theme Icon
...the pie so that they can put the story in for “protection.” That would mean Hilly would know the truth about where the events of the book take place, but would... (full context)
Chapter 28
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Writing, Storytelling, and Freedom Theme Icon
...close to her ailing mother. One night while they are watching TV, Stuart mentions that Hilly is spreading rumors that Skeeter is “some kind of crazy liberal” who wants integration. Stuart... (full context)
Chapter 30
Gender and the Home  Theme Icon
Minny watches the same news program and starts worrying what Miss Hilly will think when she gets to the last chapter – the one about her and... (full context)
Chapter 31
Racism Theme Icon
...Leefolt’s bookmark inches closer to the second chapter – the one about her. When Miss Hilly comes over one day, Aibileen overhears her saying that she’s up to chapter seven and... (full context)
Chapter 32
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...in the room. She realizes the feeling that woke her was the knowledge that Miss Hilly has just screamed while reading the last chapter. (full context)
Chapter 33
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...beat him. Lou Anne waited there all night with Louvenia. Lou Anne tells Skeeter that Hilly is spreading rumors that Skeeter was the one who wrote the book. Lou Anne says... (full context)
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Lou Anne continues, saying that if Hilly ever tells her to fire Louvenia again, she’ll respond that Hilly deserved that pie. Skeeter... (full context)
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...goes out to her porch for a breath of fresh air. Right then, she sees Hilly’s car pull up to the house. (full context)
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Hilly, who’s gained weight and developed a cold sore on her lip, marches up to the... (full context)
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Skeeter calls Aibileen at her house. Minny is also at Aibileen’s. She tells them about Hilly’s threats and then says she got a job offer as a copy editor’s assistant in... (full context)
Chapter 34
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Late that night, Aibileen gets a call from Minny. Minny says that Miss Hilly used her connections to get Leroy fired. When Leroy came home, he threatened to kill... (full context)
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While Aibileen is at work at the Leefolt’s the next day, Hilly and Miss Leefolt call Aibileen into the parlor. Hilly accuses her of stealing silver and... (full context)
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Miss Leefolt fires Aibileen but Hilly says it’s not worth pressing charges. Aibileen leaves the house and feels as if she... (full context)