The Pearl

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Kino Character Analysis

A strong, young Native American, Kino is The Pearl’s protagonist and the head of its central family. He lives with his wife, Juana, and their son, Coyotito, in a brush house near the Gulf Sea. They lead a simple and dignified life, and Kino works hard to keep his family nourished and protected. In the beginning of the novel, Kino is deeply connected to the culture of his ancestors—to their musical customs, their intimacy with nature, and their veneration of the family structure. When he finds the pearl, however, Kino develops grand ambitions and lofty aspirations, which distract him from these traditional values and lead him to commit uncharacteristic acts of violence in protection of the pearl—against his own wife as well as his greedy neighbors and others. By the end of the novel, after his efforts to keep the pearl have resulted in the disaster of Coyotito's death, Kino demonstrates a renewed respect for his wife and a return to his initial values, particularly when he allows Juana to walk by his side and then offers her the honor of throwing the pearl into the ocean.

Kino Quotes in The Pearl

The The Pearl quotes below are all either spoken by Kino or refer to Kino. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Community Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Penguin Books edition of The Pearl published in 2002.
Prologue Quotes

“In the town they tell the story of the great pearl—how it was found and how it was lost again. They tell of Kino, the fisherman, and of his wife, Juana, and of the baby, Coyotito. And because the story has been told so often, it has taken root in every man’s mind…If this story is a parable, perhaps everyone takes his own meaning from it and reads his own life into it. In any case, they say in the town that…”

Related Characters: Kino, Juana, Coyotito
Related Symbols: The Pearl
Page Number: 1
Explanation and Analysis:

This quote appears as a prologue to the story. The quotation marks that bookend the quote suggest that it is one that is often spoken aloud in the telling of the proceeding story. Thus, the story of the "great pearl" has essentially become a parable, such as The Boy who Cried Wolf or The Tortoise and the Hare. Its perpetual telling is meant to teach the listener a lesson, based on the morals gleaned from the misfortunes of Kino, Juana, and Coyotito that befell them once the Great Pearl came into their lives. The lack of geographic specificity in regards to the "town" in which this story is told suggests that, in addition to becoming a vague kind of legend, the tale is passed along in various towns as a warning of the dangers of sudden fortune.

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Chapter 1 Quotes

This doctor was of a race which for nearly four hundred years had beaten and starved and robbed and despised Kino’s race, and frightened it too, so that the indigene came humbly to the door.

Related Characters: Kino, The doctor
Page Number: 11
Explanation and Analysis:

The perfect morning is irreparably broken when Coyotito is stung on the shoulder by a scorpion. Though Juana quickly sucks out the poison, Kino and Juana fear for their baby's life. Determined to have him healed, Juana declares that they will bring Coyotito to the doctor. In this quote, the narrator notes that the doctor is of a different race than Kino, Juana, and Coyotito. He is a white descendant of Europeans who brutally colonized the lands on which Kino's ancestors have lived for thousands of years. As a result, the doctor has money and influence whereas Kino's people have been subjected to poverty. Collective memory therefore leaves Kino and the townspeople afraid of white people like the doctor, who have historically been cruel and violent to the indigenous people in the area. Juana and Kino's determination to have Coyotito treated by the white doctor is therefore viewed by the town as an act of bravery.

Chapter 2 Quotes

Every year Kino refinished his canoe with the hard shell-like plaster by the secret method that had also come to him from his father. Now he came to the canoe and touched the bow tenderly as he always did.

Related Characters: Kino
Related Symbols: Kino’s Canoe
Page Number: 15
Explanation and Analysis:

As Kino has no money for which to pay for the doctor's treatments, he is turned away from the doctor's house. In desperation, he decides to try his hand at finding a valuable pearl to sell to raise money for Coyotito's medical treatment. In this quote, the narrator shows how much pride and care Kino takes in his canoe. It is a priceless heirloom passed down from his father, and it is the sole source of his livelihood. In coating it with a "hard-shell like plaster," Kino takes care of his canoe in the same matter that a pearl is made (a pearl is created when a grain of sand enters an oyster, and it coats it in a smooth covering to avoid irritation). Kino's canoe represents his indelible connection to his ancestry, to the pearls in the ocean, and his pride in how he provides and cares for Juana and Coyotito. In touching the bow "tenderly," Kino greets his canoe, personifying it to the point that he provides the object with the same respect that he would a person that he cares for. Without the canoe--a representation of his genealogy, and how he feeds himself and his family--Kino would not be alive.

In the surface of the great pearl he could see dream forms. He picked the pearl from the dying flesh and held it in his palm, and he turned it over and saw that its curve was perfect.

Related Characters: Kino
Related Symbols: The Pearl
Page Number: 20
Explanation and Analysis:

In diving to search for oysters, Kino sees a large one separated from the clusters of oysters. He is drawn to it for its singularity and a glimmer between its lips, which hints to a pearl within. When he brings it back to the canoe, he opens the oyster with bated breath and is shocked to find a massive pearl inside. In this quote, Kino pries the pearl from the dying oyster and suddenly realizes that it could be his ticket to great wealth. As Kino has lived in poverty his entire life, he believes that all his dreams can come true with a fortune such as this. Since much of the livelihood of the people in the region come from selling pearls, finding such a perfect one in his time of need seems to be a sign that he is destined to do great things. Unfortunately, it turns out that the opposite is the case--nature is uncaring for human fate, and value and "luck" are often determined by corrupt people in power.

Chapter 3 Quotes

The essence of pearl mixed with the essence of men and a curious dark residue was precipitated. Every man suddenly became related to Kino’s pearl, and Kino’s pearl went into the dreams, the speculations, the schemes…of everyone, and only one person stood in the way and that was Kino, so that he became curiously every man’s enemy.

Related Characters: Kino
Related Symbols: The Pearl
Page Number: 23
Explanation and Analysis:

In the small town, word travels fast, and it is not long until all of the townspeople hear of Kino's pearl. As many of these people earn their living selling pearls from oysters at the bottom of the ocean, they are shocked that it was Kino, a normal man, who has found the "pearl of the world." Immediately, everyone imagines what they would do if they were in possession of such riches--or what they would like to do with Kino's imminent wealth. As the narrator notes, Kino immediately becomes everyone's "enemy"--why was he the one chosen to find such a fortune among a town of pearl divers? Those who wish that they themselves had found the pearl become irrationally angry and jealous that Kino has something they desire. Contrary to the beautiful sheen that coats a pearl and makes it so precious, the town is coated in a "curious dark residue" that makes the previously close, supportive community now envious and vengeful. Without realizing what he has done, Kino is suddenly the target of every man's jealousy and desire, simply because he possesses the pearl.

It was the rifle that broke down the barriers. This was an impossibility, and if he could think of having a rifle whole horizons were burst and he could rush on. For it is said that humans are never satisfied, that you give them one thing and they want something more.

Related Characters: Kino
Page Number: 24
Explanation and Analysis:

The townspeople ask Kino what he will spend his fortune on once he has sold the pearl. He immediately replies that he and Juana will be married in the Church, and that Coyotito will have new clothes and go to school. In this quote, he also notes that he intends to buy a rifle, which is, to an extent, still viewed as an "impossibility" despite his impending riches. This is because rifles are a European invention, and therefore strictly associated with white colonizers, brutality, and forced submission of indigenous peoples. To have a rifle is for Kino to show the rich whites that fortune has made him their equal, and to show his fellow townspeople that he has risen above the circumstances from which his people have been forced. Yet, as the narrator cautions, even this rifle might not be enough for Kino, based on human nature's inherent dissatisfaction, which continues on even after one's dreams come true. Though his seemingly improbably wish to own a rifle and rise above his circumstances has suddenly been made feasible, Kino may buy one only to want bigger and shinier objects. When great riches fill vacancies in one's life, new vacancies appear.

“I hope thou wilt remember to give thanks, my son, to Him who has given thee this treasure, and to pray for guidance in the future.”

Related Characters: The priest (speaker), Kino
Related Symbols: The Pearl
Page Number: 27
Explanation and Analysis:

Having heard about the Pearl, the priest visits Kino under the guise of wishing him well, but with the actual intention of influencing him to donate money to the Church. Rather than praising Kino for his good luck, the priest attributes Kino's good fortune to the generosity and guidance of the Christian God.The priest, a white missionary, calls each of the townspeople his "son" or "daughter" in a manner that is traditional, but in this power dynamic may be seen as patronizing. In the colonization of the Americas, conversion was frequently used as a method of control. Instead of treating the natives as his equal, the priest infantilizes them, and believes he can manipulate them under the guise of tenants of the Church. This is similar, though not as extreme, to the way that the doctor nastily notes that he does not like to treat the natives because he is not a "veterinarian," thus implying that he believes the indigenous people as so inferior to him that they are on par with animals.

But now, by saying what his future was going to be like, he had created it. A plan is a real thing, and things projected are experienced. A plan once made and visualized becomes a reality along with other realities—never to be destroyed but easily to be attacked…He knew that the gods take their revenge on a man if he be successful through his own efforts. Consequently Kino was afraid of plans, but having made one, he could never destroy it.

Related Characters: Kino
Page Number: 28
Explanation and Analysis:

When the townspeople ask Kino how he will spend his riches, he has not thought through his answers: for him and Juana to get married in the Church, for Coyotito to have new clothes and go to school, to buy a rifle for himself. But once he says these plans aloud, and he thinks of the beauty, curve, and size of the pearl, he realizes that these things may very well become a reality. However, the existence of these plans, and their sudden proximity to reality, also means that they are in danger of being attacked and the subject of revenge--just like Kino, now that he is in possession of the Pearl of the World. Knowing this, Kino has never before made such plans, but the Pearl and wealth give his future and imagination a flexibility they have never had before. Having felt the rush of wild dreams that are close to reality, Kino is determined to make these plans come true--but their reality also makes them vulnerable to attack.

And he could not take the chance of pitting his certain ignorance against this man’s possible knowledge. He was trapped as his people were always trapped, and would be until, as he had said, they could be sure that the things in the books were really in the books.

Related Characters: Kino, The doctor
Page Number: 30
Explanation and Analysis:

The doctor hears about Kino's discovery of the pearl, and suddenly becomes interested in the young family with the injured baby. He goes to Kino's house, and asks to see Coyotito. He tells the worried parents that he has seen the attack of a scorpion sting many times before, and that Coyotito, though seemingly healing, is still in danger. In this quote, Kino is wary of the doctor's claims that Coyotito is still in danger of the scorpion's poison. Yet, he notes that he was "trapped," just as his people had been trapped by colonists for years. When the European colonists came with medicines, religion, and shiny tools--namely guns and rifles that forced the indigenous people into subjugation--the native people were forced to become second-class citizens on lands that their ancestors had occupied for thousands of years. Though Juana is determined to have Coyotito treated by the doctor because he has knowledge and medicines, Kino is skeptical of believing everything the white colonists have to say, just because it comes from books that their people have written. However, he cannot be sure that his skepticism is worth denying his only son treatment, and lets the doctor see Coyotito.

[The doctor] held the eyelid down. “See—it is blue.” And Kino, looking anxiously, saw that indeed it was a little blue. And he didn’t know whether or not it was always a little blue. But the trap was set. He couldn’t take the chance.

Related Characters: The doctor (speaker), Kino, Coyotito, The doctor
Page Number: 30
Explanation and Analysis:

After examining Coyotito, the doctor points to a blue vein in the baby's eyelid, and claims it to be the poison from the scorpion's sting. Kino, though worried about his son, is still unsure whether the doctor is making things up that he knows Juana and Kino will believe, or if the baby is actually sick.The doctor gives the baby a little bit of powder, claiming that the poison will "attack within the hour." Sure enough, the baby begins to vomit, and the doctor treats him again, saying he has saved Coyotito's life. The reader is left unsure as to whether Coyitoto was actually still ill, or if the first powder the doctor feeds to the baby is poison to make him vomit and thus seem that the doctor saved Coyotito, so that Juana and Kino will feel indebted to him. Given the doctor's unsavory characterization, it is implied that the situation is likely the latter rather than the former. This, too, is Kino's instinct, though he is too nervous for his son's life to deny him treatment from a certified doctor.

“Who do you fear?” Kino searched for a true answer, and at last he said, “Everyone.” And he could feel a shell of hardness drawing over him.

Related Characters: Kino (speaker), Juana (speaker)
Page Number: 36
Explanation and Analysis:

When Kino goes to bed that evening, he is aware of the fact that he is now a target for those who are jealous of his wealth. He buries the pearl into a spot in the ground beneath his sleeping mat. In the darkness of the night, he hears something enter his hut, and thrusts his knife into the darkness. The figure runs away, and Kino sees blood on his knife. In this quote, Juana asks him who he is afraid of--they don't know who broke into their hut, but they are both aware of the fact that it was someone who wanted to steal the pearl. Kino replies that he is afraid of everyone, for it could have been anyone who broke into the hut. The intrusion represents the hostility that many members of the town now secretly harbor towards Kino due to his seemingly random stroke of luck. Like a grain of sand being coated until it is made into a pearl, Kino feels himself acquiring a shell--though this shell is one of "hardness." Kino knows that he must now be prepared to physically protect himself and his family from his own community--as well as from the pearl itself, which increasingly seems like an omen of evil, rather than good fortune. 

Chapter 4 Quotes

All of the neighbors hoped that sudden wealth would not turn Kino’s head, would not make a rich man of him, would not graft onto him the evil limbs of greed and hatred and coldness. For Kino was a well-liked man; it would be a shame if the pearl destroyed him.

Related Characters: Kino
Related Symbols: The Pearl
Page Number: 42
Explanation and Analysis:

Still reeling from Kino's good fortune, the townspeople continue to gossip about how the riches will affect Kino and his family. In this quote, his neighbors note that they hope the sudden wealth will not change Kino into a greedy and cold man. The only very wealthy people that the townspeople know are white settlers, who cruelly treat the native people as inferiors. As the indigenous people have been subjugated into extreme poverty by the settlers, the luxury of the lives of white people is something that they aspire to, but also one that they abhor. Ironically, it is the townspeople that end up changing Kino, as much as the pearl itself changes him. Because Kino's former friends and peers constantly try to steal the pearl and attack Kino, he becomes paranoid and aggressive, eventually losing not only his potential for wealth and good fortune, but also his past innocence and happiness.

“I am afraid. A man can be killed. Let us throw the pearl back into the sea.” “Hush,” he said fiercely. “I am a man. Hush.”

Related Characters: Kino (speaker), Juana (speaker)
Page Number: 56
Explanation and Analysis:

After refusing to sell the pearl to the pearl-dealer, Kino must defend himself and their home against another intruder. In this quote, Juana, convinced that the pearl is an evil object that will bring them only misfortune, urges Kino to throw it back into the sea. Kino silences Juana's pleas, fiercely telling her that he is "a man." This is the first time that the reader sees discord in Juana and Kino's seemingly harmonious relationship. Though Kino holds great respect for his wife and all she does to take care of the family, he exerts control over her when he does not get his way, in line with the tradition of patriarchy. By simply asserting the fact that he is a "man," he expresses his right to control Juana, a woman, and that he possesses the power and bravery to protect the family against any foes that challenge them. However, it is this hubris--and the jealousy of those who want the pearl--that will end up destroying the family.

Chapter 5 Quotes

A dead man in the path and Kino’s knife, dark bladed beside him, convinced her. All of the time Juana had been trying to rescue something of the old peace, of the time before the pearl. But now it was gone, and there was no retrieving it.

Related Characters: Kino, Juana
Related Symbols: The Pearl
Page Number: 59
Explanation and Analysis:

After violently halting Juana from throwing the pearl back into the sea in the middle of the night, Kino attacks two figures who attempt to steal the pearl from him. One person runs away, while the other further fights back, resulting in his murder by Kino's hand. In this quote, Juana sees the dead body and knows that their lives will never again be the same: the life that they had known before the pearl is gone forever. By creeping out of the hut while Kino was asleep, Juana attempted to banish the pearl from their lives while there was still a chance to return to the poor-but-happy harmony they had (in both their family and their community) before the fateful sting of the scorpion. Now, however, she knows that their is no turning back, and so she commits herself to trusting Kino and protecting the pearl at all costs.

Chapter 6 Quotes

And Kino ran for the high place, as nearly all animals do when they are pursued.

Related Characters: Kino
Page Number: 73
Explanation and Analysis:

With his boat broken, Kino and Juana must escape on foot. They soon hear horses, and realize that they are being followed by skilled trackers. Kino instinctively pulls his family towards the mountains for safety, as this quote notes, "as nearly all animals do when they are pursued." This is the second time in the story that Kino has been compared to an animal, the first time being when the doctor cruelly refers to the native people as animals. In this instance, it symbolizes two things: the first being the basic, animalistic instincts that all humans have to protect themselves when in danger. By heading to a high place, Kino knows that it will take the trackers longer to reach him, particularly on horseback. Second, the narrator may be echoing the thoughts that the trackers, likely white settlers, might have while analyzing the trail. Like the doctor, they may have racist, superior views towards indigenous people in which they do not equate their own intelligences with those of the natives. Similarly, this may just be Steinbeck himself writing his native character as an "other," one who is sympathetic but who is also described with animalistic, simplified language.

“Juana,” he said, “I will go and you will hide…if I can escape them, I will come to you. It is the only safe way.” She looked full into his eyes for a moment. “No,” she said. “We go with you.”

Related Characters: Kino (speaker), Juana (speaker)
Page Number: 75
Explanation and Analysis:

Pursued ever closer by the trackers, Kino is fearful for himself and his family. Since Juana is carrying Coyotito and must constantly make sure he remains silent, she cannot move as quickly as Kino can alone. In this quote, Kino urges her to hide in the mountains while he continues to move alone, creating a fake trail and ultimately sneaking up on the trackers to attack them. However, Juana refuses on the grounds that the family must stay together. This moment is a harkening back to the beginning of the story, before the family was struck with the mixed fortunes of the scorpion sting and the pearl, when everything was in harmony. Throughout all of the trauma that has come with the "good luck" of the pearl, the family has remained the most important thing in their lives, the thing that will be there regardless of the fortune, or misfortune, of the pearl. Though Juana is resigned to the loss of their old lives, she refuses to split up the family.

Everyone in La Paz remembers the return of the family; there may be some old ones who saw it, but those whose fathers and whose grandfathers told it to them remember it nevertheless. It is an event that happened to everyone.

Related Characters: Kino, Juana, Coyotito
Page Number: 84
Explanation and Analysis:

Like the quote at the beginning of the story, this quote notes that the story of Kino, Juana, and the pearl is one that is told for generations. Though the misfortunes specifically befell one family, it is perceived as a tragedy that affected the entire town. Since the town is so small, and everyone knows everything about everybody, no detail of the story remained private to Kino and Juana. Given the brutality that the people endured at the hands of the white settlers, and the subjugation they still face, each fortune is regarded as a collective one--leading to everyone wanting a piece of Kino's pearl--and each tragedy is a burden to every member of the town, not just those people it specifically effects. By retelling the story, generations bear the weight of how the promise of wealth can drive a person mad, and also bear the sadness of Coyotito's senseless death. It is a parable that warns against greed and envy, and places importance in family and safety above riches and wealth. One must always be wary of a sudden stroke of luck--if it seems too good to be true, it just might be.

The two came from the rutted country road into the city, and they were not walking in single file, Kino ahead and Juana behind, as usual, but side by side.

Related Characters: Kino, Juana
Page Number: 85
Explanation and Analysis:

After Coyotito's death, Juana and Kino return to the town, their lives irreparably changed. Having lost one-third of their family unit, the couple no longer cares as to what might happen to them should they return to town and be accused of murder. In this quote, the narrator notes that Juana and Kino walked back into town side by side, rather than Kino leading the way, as the man of the couple (presumably) does in their culture. The tragedy that has befallen their family has made them equals in their misery. The burden of the curse of the pearl is something that they share in equal parts. After seeing the courage and commitment that Juana displayed in their escape from town, Kino no longer believes that his status as a man and Juana's as a woman makes her inferior to him in terms of moral character. The fact that the two walk back side by side, a departure from how the couple used to comport itself, is a signal to the townspeople that a profound event has happened to the couple to change their habits so significantly.

The people say that the two seemed to be removed from human experience; that they had gone through pain and had come out on the other side; that there was almost a magical protection about them.

Related Characters: Kino, Juana
Page Number: 85
Explanation and Analysis:

As Juana and Kino walk back into the town, they seem changed in a way that the observers cannot quite put their fingers on. In this quote, the narrator of the story--which has now changed from the story of Kino and Juana to the parable of the Pearl, told by future generations--notes that the pair seems to have transcended their tragedy to the point that they, like the pearl did at first, seem to be coated in magic. It is implied that this "magical protection" protects the couple from the potential implications of Kino's murder, but more profoundly it's suggested that all the pain they have suffered has hardened them--in the future they might experience the usual bad luck of life, but they are now separate from emotion and normal human experience.

And then Kino laid the rifle down, and he dug among his clothes, and then he held the great pearl in his hand. He looked into its surface and it was gray and ulcerous. Evil faces peered from it into his eyes, and he saw the light of burning.

Related Characters: Kino, Juana
Related Symbols: The Pearl
Page Number: 86
Explanation and Analysis:
Upon returning to town after running for their lives and losing their child, Juana and Kino silently agree that they must be rid of the pearl. Kino bears a rifle, which he won in his altercation with the trackers. Though he finally achieves his dream of owning a rifle, it has come at a great cost--and certainly not one that he would have consented to had he been given the choice. Though the pearl had seemed so beautiful and lovely to him when he first found it, it now seems ugly and evil, as Juana had foretold. In its mottled sheen he sees his own reflection--he has murdered as many people as there have been days since finding the pearl, and he finds his own eyes to be evil. Though Kino knows he cannot earn back what he has lost--his own innocence, and the harmony of their family and community--he knows that he can rid the family of further evil by returning the pearl to the sea. 
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Kino Character Timeline in The Pearl

The timeline below shows where the character Kino appears in The Pearl. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
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Kino awakes in the early morning and looks around him to see his son still asleep... (full context)
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Kino watches a crowd of industrious ants and coaxes a shy dog that has wandered over... (full context)
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Kino goes back into the hut and eats his corncake with Juana, both of them silent... (full context)
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Suddenly, Kino and Juana freeze as they see a movement from Coyotito’s hanging box and turn their... (full context)
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Kino is reaching for the scorpion when it freezes in place and flicks its tail. Coyotito... (full context)
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From Coyotito’s shoulder, Kino takes the scorpion and squashes it angrily. Juana, meanwhile, tries to suck the poison out... (full context)
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Just as Kino is admiring her fortitude, Juana demands that the doctor be gotten. (full context)
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The neighbors follow at the heels of Kino and Juana as they walk to and arrive at the city, replete with plaster, stone,... (full context)
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...know everything about the town—the sins of its inhabitants, the bad ways of the doctor—pin Kino and Juana down as “poverty people,” and look on to see what will come of... (full context)
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At the doctor’s gate, Kino hesitates, recalling that the doctor’s people had historically oppressed his own people. Finally, still enraged... (full context)
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When the servant tells the doctor about Kino and Juana, and Coyotito’s scorpion bite, the doctor becomes angry, insulted by the notion that... (full context)
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The Doctor asks if Kino has any money, so the servant returns to the gate and asks how Kino planned... (full context)
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Shame settles over the group of neighbors and beggars that has followed Kino and Juana; they disperse to save Kino from the humiliation. (full context)
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Kino stands for a while at the gate, before putting back on his hat. In a... (full context)
Chapter 2
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Kino and Juana walk to the beach, in the direction of their canoe. Kino had inherited... (full context)
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On Kino’s blanket, Juana sets down Coyotito, who’s calmed but still swollen. Juana treats his sting with... (full context)
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The narrator notes that Juana has directed her prayers not toward Coyotito’s survival, but toward Kino’s finding a pearl with which to pay a doctor, because her mind is “as unsubstantial... (full context)
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Kino and Juana take off in the canoe, and look down at the oyster bed, which,... (full context)
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Kino dives into the water with his basket. Filling it with oysters, he hears in his... (full context)
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Young and able, Kino stays for a long time underwater, carefully selecting the largest and most promising oysters. (full context)
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He finds one oyster lying alone, with a partly opened shell, revealing a gleam within. Kino’s heart beats excitedly and he hears loudly the Song of the Pearl. (full context)
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Kino reaches the water’s surface and places that final oyster at the bottom of the canoe.... (full context)
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When it comes time to open the promising oyster, Kino hesitates, afraid its glint was an illusion, but Juana encourages him. (full context)
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Kino hears the Song of the Pearl that Might Be resonant and warm and sees dream... (full context)
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...to check on Coyotito and finds that the swelling of his shoulder has gone down. Kino clenches the pearl and howls. (full context)
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Men in neighboring canoes paddle quickly toward Kino’s. (full context)
Chapter 3
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...It takes, therefore, no time at all for everyone in the town to learn that Kino has found "the Pearl of the World." (full context)
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When the doctor hears of Kino’s pearl, he openly declares that Kino is his client and that he is treating Kino’s... (full context)
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When the pearl-dealers hear of Kino’s pearl, their fingers burn with anticipation, scheming of how they might become more powerful than... (full context)
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People in the town begin associating the pearl with their own dreams and desires. Kino, who stands in the way as the pearl’s true owner, becomes the obstacle to the... (full context)
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Kino and Juana, unaware of the envy that surrounds them, assume that everyone feels the joy... (full context)
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When Juan Tomas asks Kino what he will do as a rich man, Juana covers her excitement with her shawl... (full context)
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Kino continues to look into the pearl, seeing new desirable forms in its translucent surface. He... (full context)
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The neighbors echo that Kino will have a rifle. (full context)
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Juana looks admiringly at Kino while he sees in the pearl visions of ever-grander dreams. He pictures Coyotito at a... (full context)
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Kino continues to prophesy, declaring that his son will read and write and make numbers, and... (full context)
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...of this moment and imagine how it will be remembered in years to come. If Kino accomplishes these things, they muse, it will be recalled as a moment of empowerment; if... (full context)
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Kino looks down to see that his knuckles are scabbing. (full context)
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...to the brush house. The Father, who treats the villagers like children, enters, and reminds Kino that he is named after a “great man.” (full context)
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Kino begins to hear the song of evil, but knows not what brought it on. (full context)
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The priest tells Kino that he’s heard of the pearl, and that he hopes that Kino will thank God... (full context)
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The neighbors leave to go to their own houses, and Kino stands outside, feeling alone and unprotected though hearing the Song of the Family from behind... (full context)
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...the brush house, proclaiming his intention to see the baby, with his servant in tow. Kino’s eyes burn with hatred for the years of subjugation that the doctor represents. (full context)
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Kino replies that Coyotito is almost all better, but the doctor retorts that there often appears... (full context)
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Kino feels trapped between rage and fear, but finally lets the doctor enter. The doctor goes... (full context)
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When the doctor has gone, Kino wraps the pearl in a rag and hides it in the floor in the corner... (full context)
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Juana calls to Kino to show him Coyotito’s stomach spasms and flushed face, which convince the couple that the... (full context)
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...he is able to defeat the effect of the poison. He feeds Coyotito ammonia as Kino watches the doctor and his doctor’s bag carefully. The doctor claims that the baby will... (full context)
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Kino says that he will pay the doctor once he’s sold his pearl. The doctor feigns... (full context)
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When everyone has left, Kino listens to the sounds of the night and then reburies the pearl in a hole... (full context)
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As Kino and Juana try to fall asleep, Kino’s mind continues to work, dreaming of a learned... (full context)
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Kino assures Juana that he is alright, and Juana begins to make a fire and clean... (full context)
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Kino cleans his knife by plunging it into the earth. Morning sounds enter the house and... (full context)
Chapter 4
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...person disturbs this pattern, everyone hears about it. So, it’s quickly known by all that Kino intends to sell his pearl. (full context)
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The pearl dealers have heard word of Kino’s intention and they sit in their offices and fantasize. All under the control of a... (full context)
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...deeds and donations, and they hope that the pearl will not do bad things to Kino and his family. (full context)
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The importance of this day for Kino and Juana is felt very strongly. Juana dreams of a baptism for Coyotito. (full context)
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All the neighbors go, as expected, to follow Kino and Juana to the pearl dealers. (full context)
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Juana and Kino prepare to go with Coyotito, Kino tilting his hat forward to convey his serious intentions.... (full context)
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Juan Tomas walks next to Kino, warning his brother that the dealers might cheat him, because Kino doesn’t know what buyers... (full context)
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Kino posits that that old system was a good idea, but that it went against the... (full context)
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The brothers resemble their ancestors and Kino uses his only defense—a stolid facial expression. (full context)
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Kino goes in to one particular dealer, a “jolly man” capable of laughter and sorrow. He... (full context)
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The dealer continues to play with the coin behind his desk as he speaks to Kino, asks to see the pearl, and promises the best price. Kino brings out the bag... (full context)
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...because it is too big and clumsy. He assesses it at a mere 1000 pesos. Kino tries to defend the pearl and accuses the dealer of cheating him. The dealer, now... (full context)
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Kino feels evil swell about him, but gains strength when he looks at Juana. (full context)
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Kino grabs the pearl and cries that he’s been cheated and will go to the capital.... (full context)
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...that the dealers had spoken and plotted beforehand, but dismiss the notion. Some think that Kino has destroyed himself. Others think that Kino is brave. (full context)
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In his house, Kino mulls over the possibility of going to the capital, at first wary of the idea... (full context)
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Juan Tomas comes in and is silent for a long time, before expressing fear for Kino now that has acted against the dealers and the whole system they represent. Juan encourages... (full context)
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Kino insists that he must go, at least to give his son a chance, and proclaims... (full context)
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Kino says “Go with God” and, when Juan leaves, Kino sits observing all the sounds that... (full context)
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Kino senses something outside the house and clutches his knife as he walks outside. Juana hears... (full context)
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Juana brings Kino, half conscious, into the house and wipes off his blood. Kino reports that he could... (full context)
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Kino insists that he will defeat the evil forces, declaring himself “a man.” He confirms the... (full context)
Chapter 5
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Kino awakes in the middle of the night to see Juana arise from the bed mat,... (full context)
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Kino hisses at his wife with bared teeth, while Juana looks back with brave eyes. She... (full context)
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...body whose fingers search through his clothes for the pearl. The pearl is forced from Kino’s hand and lands upon the ground. (full context)
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Juana, meanwhile, lifts herself up and reassures herself that Kino is necessary for her survival. She acknowledges and appreciates the differences between the values of... (full context)
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Following after Kino, Juana comes across the pearl. She is considering whether she ought to try disposing of... (full context)
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Seeing that Kino has killed the other figure, Juana recognizes that she and Kino have left the life... (full context)
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Kino begins to complain of having lost the pearl, but Juana silences him by presenting it.... (full context)
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Kino instructs Juana to get Coyotito from the house while he brings the corn and prepares... (full context)
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Kino does not think to steal a neighbor’s canoe. (full context)
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The sounds and smells of morning activity arrive and Kino, determined, runs towards the house, only to find it engulfed in flames. Juana comes towards... (full context)
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Kino is afraid and then slips into Juan Tomas’s hut, pulling his family in behind him.... (full context)
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Kino tells Juan about the attacks and the murder he committed in self-defense, to which Juan... (full context)
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Kino and Juana sit in silence during the day and hear what the neighbors are saying... (full context)
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Kino says that he intends to go north and Juan informs him that men from the... (full context)
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Kino and Juana leave the house before the moon has come out. Juan calls to his... (full context)
Chapter 6
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In strong wind and under a black sky, Kino and Juana begin to follow the sandy road that leads to Loreto, the home of... (full context)
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Something ancient and animal awakens within Kino and exhilarates him. (full context)
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The moon rises and the wind has calmed. Without the wind to erase their tracks, Kino tries to follow an existing wheel rut. (full context)
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Coyotes and owls make their night noises. Evil lurks about. Kino and Juana walk all night, and Kino hears the song of the pearl and the... (full context)
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At dawn, Kino finds a clearing by the road to sleep in for a bit. While Juana nurses... (full context)
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Kino watches ants at his feet as he eats a corncake Juana has offered him. The... (full context)
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Juana and Kino discuss the likelihood of whether they are being followed. Kino is certain that they will... (full context)
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Kino declares aloud that he will have a rifle, but can see in the pearl only... (full context)
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Kino puts the pearl back and the music of evil interweaves again with the music of... (full context)
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Juana is playing with Coyotito and Kino is lightly asleep when Kino cries out in a bad dream and then sits up... (full context)
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...man on a horse and two men walking close to the ground, inspecting like hounds. Kino tries to hold his breath as he recognizes these men as inland trackers, out to... (full context)
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Kino decides that he must lunge for the horseman and grab his rifle, and digs his... (full context)
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Kino backs up, considering it hopeless to cover his tracks, and suggests to Juana that maybe... (full context)
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Kino pictures the trackers coming up the mountain after them, once they find Kino and Juana’s... (full context)
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Kino tells Juana to go north to Loreto or Santa Rosia while he leads the trackers... (full context)
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Kino walks in a zig-zag to throw off the trackers, and sets out for the spot... (full context)
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Kino and Juana arrive at a little spring, with water bubbling out of the stone and... (full context)
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Kino looks down the mountain and sees the trackers scurrying up, ant-like. He estimates that they’ll... (full context)
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Kino tells Juana the plan—when the trackers follow Kino’s path uphill, Kino and Juana will go... (full context)
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Kino pictures the position of the men, and then returns to Juana and informs her that... (full context)
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The moon comes up before Kino had hoped, and Coyotito cries a little from the cave. The trackers hear the cry... (full context)
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Kino leaps out and the gun fires. Kino digs his knife into the watchers’ neck and... (full context)
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The narrator reports that all the people of La Paz remember the moment when Kino and Juana came back to the town as the sun was setting. They walked not... (full context)
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They reach the Gulf shore, not looking towards the ruined canoe, and Kino lays down the rifle and takes out the pearl, offering it to Juana. She insists... (full context)
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Kino and Juana stand next to one another and the music of the pearl fades away. (full context)