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Farewell, ungrateful traitor! Summary & Analysis
by John Dryden

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"Farewell, ungrateful traitor!" is a song from John Dryden's 1681 play The Spanish Friar. In this ferocious poem, a speaker laments that her lover has abandoned her, and swears she'll never love again. Men are liars who lose interest in you as soon as you fall for them, she says bitterly, and the pleasures of love come at a terrible cost. But there's rueful humor in this lament as well as pain; the poem's jaded, witty tone fits right into the traditions of the Restoration comedy, a 17th-century theatrical movement of which Dryden was a well-known master.

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