A Room with a View

Pdf fan dd71f526917d6085d66d045bd94fb5b55d02a108dd45d836cbdd4abe2d4c043d Tap here to download this LitChart! (PDF)

Mrs. Honeychurch Character Analysis

Lucy’s mother, who adheres to traditional Victorian social norms and ideas about gender roles. (For example, she bristles at learning that Miss Lavish is a novelist, thinking that women shouldn’t be writers.) Mrs. Honeychurch is a kind and rather supportive mother, but doesn’t quite understand what is happening with Lucy when she breaks off her engagement to Cecil. At the end of the novel, she is angry with Lucy for eloping with George to Italy.

Mrs. Honeychurch Quotes in A Room with a View

The A Room with a View quotes below are all either spoken by Mrs. Honeychurch or refer to Mrs. Honeychurch. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Society, Manners, and Changing Social Norms Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Penguin Classics edition of A Room with a View published in 2000.
Chapter 9 Quotes

Beware of women altogether. Only let to a man. . . . Men don't gossip over tea-cups. If they get drunk, there's an end of them—they lie down comfortably and sleep it off. If they're vulgar, they somehow keep it to themselves. It doesn't spread so. Give me a man—of course, provided he's clean.

Related Characters: Mrs. Honeychurch (speaker)
Page Number: 97
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Miss Honeychurch tells Lucy that she prefers men to women in almost every way. Women, she claims, are persistently troublesome. Men, on the other hand, are troublesome, but only in the short term--they have a way of getting over their problems quickly and efficiently.

Miss Honeychurch's monologue illustrates her internalized misogyny. Honeychurch is the most primly Victorian character in the novel (no small feat), and thus she sees the world in the most repressive terms. Women, she believes, should be proper and polite at all times, and try not to make trouble (which, she assumes, is in their nature). Of course, Miss Honeychurch isn't just a sexist. As she suggests when she insists that men be "clean," Honeychurch is almost something of a classist, reluctant to admit any of the "coal-dusted masses" into her life. 

A+

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other A Room with a View quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!
Chapter 19 Quotes

But I cannot see why you didn't tell your friends about Cecil and be done with it. There all the time we had to sit fencing, and almost telling lies, and be seen through, too, I dare say, which is most unpleasant.

Related Characters: Mrs. Honeychurch (speaker), Lucy Honeychurch, Cecil Vyse
Page Number: 179
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Miss Honeychurch talks to her daughter about her broken engagement to Cecil. Honeychurch doesn't really understand why Lucy has broken off the engagement, but she wants she news of the broken engagement to get out anyway. Mrs. Honeychurch is, as one might expect, a master of public relations: she knows that the best way to avoid a scandal is to be open and honest about the engagement; otherwise people will assume that Mrs. Honeychurch and her family are hiding something.

Mrs. Honeychurch's stated reasons for breaking the news of the broken engagement are fascinating: she suggests the danger of "being seen" as frauds. Respectability is the basic currency of the English upper-classes, and to be deceptive or devious in anything is the easiest way to lose respectability.

Get the entire A Room with a View LitChart as a printable PDF.
A room with a view.pdf.medium

Mrs. Honeychurch Character Timeline in A Room with a View

The timeline below shows where the character Mrs. Honeychurch appears in A Room with a View. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 8
Education and Independence Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...Lucy’s brother Freddy is examining a bone and reading an anatomy manual, while Lucy’s mother Mrs. Honeychurch is writing a letter in the drawing room. They are discussing Lucy and a man... (full context)
Society, Manners, and Changing Social Norms Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Mrs. Honeychurch is writing to Cecil’s mother—Mrs. Vyse, of the same family that Lucy visited in Rome—and... (full context)
Society, Manners, and Changing Social Norms Theme Icon
Honesty Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...thought the marriage would be a good thing. Freddy answered honestly, saying no. This irritates Mrs. Honeychurch , who reminds Freddy of “all that has passed between them [Lucy and Cecil] in... (full context)
Society, Manners, and Changing Social Norms Theme Icon
Freddy tries to discern what it is about Cecil that he dislikes, as Mrs. Honeychurch looks over her letter, in which she tells Mrs. Vyse that she would be pleased... (full context)
Sexism and Women’s Roles Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Beauty Theme Icon
Cecil informs Mrs. Honeychurch (first in Italian, then in English) that Lucy has accepted his marriage proposal, and both... (full context)
Society, Manners, and Changing Social Norms Theme Icon
Honesty Theme Icon
Freddy and Mrs. Honeychurch enter, and both are excited about the engagement. The narrator quips that “an engagement is... (full context)
Chapter 9
Society, Manners, and Changing Social Norms Theme Icon
A few days after the engagement, Mrs. Honeychurch takes Lucy and Cecil to a garden party, to show off the “presentable man” her... (full context)
Sexism and Women’s Roles Theme Icon
...that she knows two such women from Florence—the Miss Alans. Sir Harry loves this idea. Mrs. Honeychurch says she would rather have men live there than women, because men “don’t gossip over... (full context)
Chapter 10
Society, Manners, and Changing Social Norms Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Lucy tries to ascertain if this is the same Emerson family from Florence, and Mrs. Honeychurch says that she hopes the new tenants are “the right sort of person.” She says... (full context)
Society, Manners, and Changing Social Norms Theme Icon
Honesty Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...The queerest people!” He says that there was a rumor Mr. Emerson killed his wife. Mrs. Honeychurch comments that this makes two accused murderers in the Pension Bertolini, as there was also... (full context)
Chapter 11
Society, Manners, and Changing Social Norms Theme Icon
Sexism and Women’s Roles Theme Icon
Honesty Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...the Emersons. Charlotte says that she is worried and warns Lucy that she should tell Mrs. Honeychurch about her history with George Emerson. (full context)
Chapter 12
Society, Manners, and Changing Social Norms Theme Icon
Sexism and Women’s Roles Theme Icon
Beauty Theme Icon
Suddenly, Mr. Beebe alerts George and Freddy that people are coming by. Mrs. Honeychurch , Cecil, and Lucy happen to be walking through the woods. They see the three... (full context)
Society, Manners, and Changing Social Norms Theme Icon
Sexism and Women’s Roles Theme Icon
Beauty Theme Icon
Mrs. Honeychurch is not shocked, though, and tells the three to dry off before coming inside, so... (full context)
Chapter 13
Society, Manners, and Changing Social Norms Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Beauty Theme Icon
...star.” Cecil is bored with talking to Mrs. Butterworth, and behaves difficultly. Back at home, Mrs. Honeychurch comments on how rude Cecil can be to people around Windy Corner, where “nothing appears... (full context)
Honesty Theme Icon
Education and Independence Theme Icon
Lucy and Mrs. Honeychurch talk about the letter Lucy received from Charlotte. Mrs. Honeychurch asks about Charlotte’s boiler, which... (full context)
Sexism and Women’s Roles Theme Icon
Honesty Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Lucy says that Charlotte mentioned Miss Lavish, a novelist, knowing that this will cause Mrs. Honeychurch to go on about female writers. Indeed, her mother speaks at length about how, “if... (full context)
Society, Manners, and Changing Social Norms Theme Icon
Education and Independence Theme Icon
...her. She admits that both she and Cecil don’t like Charlotte, and calls her “tiresome.” Mrs. Honeychurch chides them both for not taking pity on Charlotte, and says, “you are young, dears,... (full context)
Chapter 15
Education and Independence Theme Icon
Beauty Theme Icon
The next Sunday, a very sunny day, Lucy, Mrs. Honeychurch , Charlotte, and Minnie Beebe are all preparing to go to church. George, Freddy, and... (full context)
Society, Manners, and Changing Social Norms Theme Icon
...to church, Minnie doesn’t want to go, wondering why she can’t stay with the men. Mrs. Honeychurch speaks up in favor of church, and insists that Minnie come. After church, Mrs. Honeychurch... (full context)
Chapter 18
Society, Manners, and Changing Social Norms Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Beauty Theme Icon
...playing Mozart on the piano. He decides to let her be, and goes to find Mrs. Honeychurch at work in her garden with Minnie, Charlotte and a servant. He goes inside and... (full context)
Sexism and Women’s Roles Theme Icon
Beauty Theme Icon
...“place her out of danger.” He and Charlotte go back to Windy Corner and convince Mrs. Honeychurch to let Lucy go to Greece with the Alans. Mr. Beebe then sees Lucy playing... (full context)
Love Theme Icon
Mrs. Honeychurch goes to Lucy and tells her that she will allow her to go to Greece.... (full context)
Chapter 19
Honesty Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Mrs. Honeychurch and Lucy go to visit the Alans in London, in preparation for the Greece trip.... (full context)
Honesty Theme Icon
Education and Independence Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Mrs. Honeychurch is sad that Lucy is leaving Freddy and her for the Alans, and comments that... (full context)
Love Theme Icon
...on. They learn from a servant that the Emersons have moved out. As Lucy and Mrs. Honeychurch go to the church to get Charlotte, Lucy thinks of what a wasted effort the... (full context)
Honesty Theme Icon
Education and Independence Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...to stay for a service, so Lucy waits in Mr. Beebe’s study while Charlotte and Mrs. Honeychurch go into the church. There, Lucy is surprised to find Mr. Emerson, who immediately apologizes... (full context)