Candide

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Candide's teacher, a philosopher who follows the teachings of the philosopher Leibniz. Pangloss argues that this world is “the best of all possible worlds,” and none of his many misfortunes—including enslavement, hanging, and losing an eye and an ear to syphilis—can convince him otherwise. His name means “all-tongue,” reflecting his tendency to speak at length about philosophy no matter what is going on.

Pangloss Quotes in Candide

The Candide quotes below are all either spoken by Pangloss or refer to Pangloss. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Optimism and Disillusion Theme Icon
).
Chapter 1 Quotes

“It is demonstrable," said he, "that things cannot be otherwise than as they are; for all being created for an end, all is necessarily for the best end. Observe, that the nose has been formed to bear spectacles—thus we have spectacles. Legs are visibly designed for stockings—and we have stockings. Stones were made to be hewn, and to construct castles—therefore my lord has a magnificent castle; for the greatest baron in the province ought to be the best lodged. Pigs were made to be eaten—therefore we eat pork all the year round. Consequently they who assert that all is well have said a foolish thing, they should have said all is for the best.”

Related Characters: Pangloss (speaker)
Chapter 4 Quotes

“Alas!” said the other, “it was love; love, the comfort of the human species, the preserver of the universe, the soul of all sensible beings, love, tender love.”

Related Characters: Pangloss (speaker)

"This present Paquette received of a learned Grey Friar, who had traced it to its source; he had had it of an old countess, who had received it from a cavalry captain, who owed it to a marchioness, who took it from a page, who had received it from a Jesuit, who when a novice had it in a direct line from one of the companions of Christopher Columbus. For my part I shall give it to nobody, I am dying."

Related Characters: Pangloss (speaker), Paquette
Chapter 5 Quotes

“What can be the sufficient reason of this phenomenon?” said Pangloss.
“This is the Last Day!” cried Candide.

Related Characters: Candide (speaker), Pangloss (speaker)
Chapter 15 Quotes

“Reverend Father, all the quarterings in the world signify nothing; I rescued your sister from the arms of a Jew and of an Inquisitor; she has great obligations to me, she wishes to marry me; Master Pangloss always told me that all men are equal, and certainly I will marry her.”

Related Characters: Candide (speaker), Pangloss, The Young Baron
Chapter 22 Quotes

“I have seen the worst," Candide replied. "But a wise man, who since has had the misfortune to be hanged, taught me that all is marvelously well; these are but the shadows on a beautiful picture.”

Related Characters: Candide (speaker), Pangloss
Conclusion Quotes

“You are right,” said Pangloss, “for when man was first placed in the Garden of Eden, he was put there ut operaretur eum, that he might cultivate it; which shows that man was not born to be idle.”

Related Characters: Pangloss (speaker)
Related Symbols: The Garden
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Pangloss Character Timeline in Candide

The timeline below shows where the character Pangloss appears in Candide. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
Optimism and Disillusion Theme Icon
The Enlightenment and Social Criticism Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy vs. The World Theme Icon
...illegitimate nephew of the Baron, but nobody knows for certain. He studies metaphysico-theologico-cosmolo-nigology under Professor Pangloss, who teaches that we live in the best of all possible worlds, and further, that... (full context)
Religion and Philosophy vs. The World Theme Icon
Love and Women Theme Icon
One day Cunégonde, daughter of the Baron, happens upon Pangloss having sex with Paquette, a chambermaid. Intrigued, she determines to do the same with Candide.... (full context)
Chapter 3
Optimism and Disillusion Theme Icon
...cleans him, feeds him, and helps him recover. Candide, relieved, expresses his renewed faith in Pangloss' optimism. (full context)
Chapter 4
Optimism and Disillusion Theme Icon
Love and Women Theme Icon
...a walk, he comes across a man with syphilis. The man turns out to be Pangloss, and the two have a tearful reunion. Pangloss informs Candide that Bulgarians invaded Thunder-ten-tronckh, raping... (full context)
Optimism and Disillusion Theme Icon
The Enlightenment and Social Criticism Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy vs. The World Theme Icon
Love and Women Theme Icon
The conversation turns to Pangloss' syphilis. When Candide asks what the “sufficient cause,” of his illness was, Pangloss explains that... (full context)
Optimism and Disillusion Theme Icon
The Enlightenment and Social Criticism Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy vs. The World Theme Icon
Candide convinces Jacques the Anabaptist to pay for Pangloss' cure. Pangloss loses an eye and an ear to syphilis, but recovers. After two months,... (full context)
Chapter 5
Optimism and Disillusion Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy vs. The World Theme Icon
...as he does so. The sailor lets him drown, and when Candide attempts a rescue, Pangloss explains that he must not: he argues that the Bay of Lisbon was created specifically... (full context)
Religion and Philosophy vs. The World Theme Icon
...the rubble of a building which has collapsed during the earthquake. He cries out for Pangloss to help him. Instead of going to get help immediately, Pangloss argues with him about... (full context)
Optimism and Disillusion Theme Icon
The Enlightenment and Social Criticism Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy vs. The World Theme Icon
Pangloss consoles the victims of the earthquake by explaining that “it is impossible that things should... (full context)
Chapter 6
The Enlightenment and Social Criticism Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy vs. The World Theme Icon
...for the punishment of sinners and heretics) is the best way to prevent further earthquakes. Pangloss is lead off to be hung for his heresy, and Candide, to be whipped for... (full context)
Chapter 8
Optimism and Disillusion Theme Icon
The Enlightenment and Social Criticism Theme Icon
Love and Women Theme Icon
...the day of the auto-da-fé, the Grand Inquisitor brought Cunégonde to watch. When she saw Pangloss executed and Candide whipped, she cried out in horror. Later, she arranged for the old... (full context)
Chapter 10
The Enlightenment and Social Criticism Theme Icon
Wealth Theme Icon
...insufficient money to travel with, he accepts that everything on earth belongs to everyone, as Pangloss taught him, and that the friar had as much right to the money as anyone... (full context)
Chapter 15
The Enlightenment and Social Criticism Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy vs. The World Theme Icon
Love and Women Theme Icon
...Issachar, that she wants to marry him, and that all men are equal according to Pangloss. The Reverend Commandant slaps Candide across the face with the flat of his blade. In... (full context)
Chapter 18
Optimism and Disillusion Theme Icon
The Enlightenment and Social Criticism Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy vs. The World Theme Icon
...divisions or sects, and all worship consists in giving thanks to God. Candide concludes that Pangloss was wrong about the “best of all possible worlds,” being in Westphalia: if he had... (full context)
Chapter 22
The Enlightenment and Social Criticism Theme Icon
Love and Women Theme Icon
Wealth Theme Icon
...Thunder-ten-tronckh. Candide speaks to a wise man about art and philosophy, and considers him “another Pangloss.” But the Marchioness complains that he is a nobody, a man who has never had... (full context)
Chapter 27
Optimism and Disillusion Theme Icon
...possible to measure the relative unhappiness of individuals. Halfway through the voyage, Candide discovers that Pangloss and the Young Baron—thought dead—are slaves on the galley. As soon as they reach the... (full context)
Chapter 28
The Enlightenment and Social Criticism Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy vs. The World Theme Icon
The Young Baron and Pangloss tell Candide and Martin how they each ended up enslaved. Soon after recovering from the... (full context)
Optimism and Disillusion Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy vs. The World Theme Icon
Pangloss then begins to tell his own story. Though he was hung at the auto-da-fé, this... (full context)
Chapter 29
Optimism and Disillusion Theme Icon
The Enlightenment and Social Criticism Theme Icon
Love and Women Theme Icon
Finally, Candide, Martin, Pangloss, Cacambo and the Young Baron arrive at the palace where Cunégonde and the old woman... (full context)
Conclusion
Optimism and Disillusion Theme Icon
The Enlightenment and Social Criticism Theme Icon
Love and Women Theme Icon
...Jesuits in Rome. Afterwards, he purchases and lives on a small farm with Cunégonde, Cacambo, Pangloss, Martin, and the old woman. Though they are at last reunited, they are all unhappy:... (full context)
Optimism and Disillusion Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy vs. The World Theme Icon
Candide, Martin, Pangloss, Cacambo, Cunégonde and the old woman spend their days arguing about the meaning of life.... (full context)
Religion and Philosophy vs. The World Theme Icon
...their endless philosophical debates, Candide and the other remaining characters visit a wise Dervish. Using Pangloss as a spokesperson, they ask the Dervish why man was made, and why there is... (full context)
Optimism and Disillusion Theme Icon
The Enlightenment and Social Criticism Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy vs. The World Theme Icon
Later, Candide, Martin and Pangloss meet a local farmer, who invites them into his house for a meal. They start... (full context)