Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

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Mr. Gabriel Utterson Character Analysis

is a lawyer whose perspective the novel follows for most of the story as he tries to uncover the mystery of Dr. Jekyll connection to Mr. Hyde. He is introduced as a kind and reserved man, full of a sense of responsibility for his friends, but his faith is tested throughout Jekyll’s changing state. Utterson’s part in the whole affair is as a kind of fly on the wall, and very little of his own life seems to matter for the story.

Mr. Gabriel Utterson Quotes in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

The Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde quotes below are all either spoken by Mr. Gabriel Utterson or refer to Mr. Gabriel Utterson. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Science, Reason and the Supernatural Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Signet Classics edition of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde published in 2012.
Chapter 2 Quotes

"Poor Harry Jekyll," he thought, "my mind misgives me he is in deep waters! He was wild when he was young; a long while ago to be sure; but in the law of God, there is no statute of limitations. Ay, it must be that; the ghost of some old sin, the cancer of some concealed disgrace…”

Related Characters: Mr. Gabriel Utterson (speaker), Dr. Jekyll
Page Number: 63
Explanation and Analysis:

Utterson has known Dr. Jekyll for many years, and he's even aware that when Jekyll was a younger man, he he used to get in trouble. Utterson wonders if Jekyll's current behavior (unpredictable and untrustworthy) might have something to do with the sins of his youth.

Notably, Utterson claims that sin has no "statue of limitations"--in other words, the sins of Jekylll's past will stay with him forever. Over the course of the novel, Utterson's words will prove correct: Hyde is the very embodiment of Jekyll's dark, secret nature, proof that all human beings contain deep, sinful secrets which they try, and fail, to repress.

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Chapter 3 Quotes

The large handsome face of Dr. Jekyll grew pale to the very lips, and there came a blackness about his eyes. "I do not care to hear more," said he. "This is a matter I thought we had agreed to drop."

Related Characters: Dr. Jekyll, Mr. Gabriel Utterson
Related Symbols: The Appearance of Evil
Page Number: 66
Explanation and Analysis:

In this chapter, Mr. Utterson brings up Mr. Hyde to Dr. Jekyll. Instead of talking about the matter, Jekyll replies that he refuses to discuss Hyde in any capacity. Utterson is surprised by Jekyll's reaction, since Utterson is one of Jekyll's oldest friends.

Jekyll's behavior--i.e., his refusal to discuss his secrets--is indicative of the repressive, stuffy atmosphere of Jekyll's society: Victorian society in general, but particular his circle of bachelor friends and acquaintances. Like his friends, Jekyll refuses to disclose his sins, or even to allude to them. And yet even here, when Jekyll hasn't ingested any of the potion that transforms him into Hyde, Utterson can see some "blackness" in Jekyll. It's as if Jekyll's secret, sinful nature is struggling desperately to get out, affecting even his physical appearance.

Chapter 7 Quotes

The middle one of the three windows was half-way open; and sitting close beside it, taking the air with an infinite sadness of mien, like some disconsolate prisoner, Utterson saw Dr. Jekyll.

Related Characters: Dr. Jekyll, Mr. Gabriel Utterson
Page Number: 86
Explanation and Analysis:

Here, Utterson notices Dr. Jekyll sitting in his laboratory. Jekyll seems sad, almost like a prisoner, although Utterson isn't yet aware of the truth. In reality, Dr. Jekyll has become something like a prisoner: after months of drinking his potion, he's unable to control when and where Mr. Hyde rears his ugly head, and as a result, he's forced to sit indoors, lest Mr. Hyde be seen and arrested for his crimes.

The image of Jekyll trapped inside a prison-like building is evocative of the changing relationship between Jekyll and Hyde. At first, Hyde was the prisoner, trapped within the "prison" of Dr. Jekyll's good nature and proper manners. But now, Jekyll is the prisoner, a slave to his own sinful drives. 

Chapter 8 Quotes

The hall, when they entered it, was brightly lighted up; the fire was built high; and about the hearth the whole of the servants, men and women, stood huddled together like a flock of sheep.

Related Characters: Mr. Gabriel Utterson, Poole
Page Number: 89
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Mr. UItterson is summoned to Dr. Jekyll's laboratory immediately. There, Utterson is shocked to see Jekyll locked in his room, with the servants of his household gathered around the bright, warm fire.

Stevenson chooses his words very carefully. Notice that the servants are described as being a "flock of sheep," reinforcing their innocent, blissfully ignorant nature. The servants are huddled around a warm, bright fire, a symbol of goodness and virtue (but also a Promethean symbol of the runaway scientific knowledge that has brought Jekyll to his current lowly position!). In contrast, Jekyll is portrayed as being isolated from the rest of society, a slave to his own dark desires. Jekyll has stumbled upon a discovery so horrifying that he can scarcely control it: all human beings have a secret evil side which, once directly outed, can never be fully controlled again. As Stevenson writes, the servants remain blissfully unaware of their own secret potential for evil.

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Mr. Gabriel Utterson Character Timeline in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

The timeline below shows where the character Mr. Gabriel Utterson appears in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
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Mr. Utterson, a lawyer, is modest, a little dreary but endearing, with something very warm in his... (full context)
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One of Mr. Utterson’s friends is Richard Enfield, with whom he takes regular Sunday walks. To see the pair... (full context)
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Utterson asks Enfield if he has ever noticed this door and Enfield says that he has,... (full context)
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...celebrated gentleman, though Mr. Enfield in his story does not reveal the man's name to Utterson. (full context)
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Mr. Enfield can see that Mr. Utterson is affected by the story too. He continues, troubled by how the man can be... (full context)
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...out except, occasionally, for the man, but that the house's chimney is always smoking. Mr. Utterson asks to know the gentleman’s name, and Mr. Enfield doesn’t think much harm can come... (full context)
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Utterson asks what Mr. Hyde looks like, but Enfield can hardly describe it. He says that... (full context)
Chapter 2
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Mr. Utterson returns to his house, in a somber mood. It is his usual routine on a... (full context)
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This document has always angered Mr. Utterson. At first it was because he didn’t know Mr. Hyde, and didn’t know why this... (full context)
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Mr. Utterson goes to visit his friend Dr. Lanyon, whose house is always crowded with eager patients.... (full context)
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Mr. Utterson is glad of this explanation from Dr. Lanyon because he thinks that his dispute with... (full context)
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As Utterson sleeps, the images become more repetitive and nightmarish but he can never make out Mr.... (full context)
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The steps draw nearer until Mr. Utterson sees the plain figure of the man in question and quickly surprises him at the... (full context)
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Mr. Utterson explains to Mr. Hyde that they have mutual friends, naming Dr. Jekyll as one of... (full context)
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Mr. Utterson walks to a house around the corner, in a square of elegant but old properties,... (full context)
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Mr. Utterson asks the servant if it is all right that he has seen Mr. Hyde going... (full context)
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This makes Utterson think of his own past. He, of all people, has little cause to worry about... (full context)
Chapter 3
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Dr. Jekyll holds a dinner party for some close friends. Mr. Utterson, as he often does, stays around after the others have gone to talk to the... (full context)
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Mr. Utterson brings up the subject of Jekyll's will, but before he can ask anything, Jekyll expresses... (full context)
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Utterson brings Dr. Jekyll back to the matter at hand and says he now has even... (full context)
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Dr. Jekyll lastly tries to explain to Mr. Utterson that he actually finds Mr. Hyde very interesting, and asks Utterson to try his best... (full context)
Chapter 4
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...with half of the cane, a purse of money, and a letter addressed to Mr. Utterson. (full context)
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The police bring the letter in the morning to Mr. Utterson and he announces very solemnly that he will not say anything else until he has... (full context)
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The policeman gives the maid’s description of the murderer and asks Mr. Utterson whether he has any clue who it could be. Now seeing the broken stick, Utterson... (full context)
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...bank and are pleased to find that Hyde has thousands of pounds to his credit. Utterson declares that they will surely catch him; all they have to do is wait for... (full context)
Chapter 5
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That afternoon, Utterson has come to Dr. Jekyll’s house and is taken for the first time to the... (full context)
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Dr. Jekyll is changed. Utterson asks whether Jekyll is concealing Hyde, to which Jekyll responds that he has heard the... (full context)
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Utterson asks Jekyll about the envelope but too late—Jekyll has already burned it. Jekyll explains that... (full context)
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On the way out, Utterson asks Poole, Dr. Jekyll’s servant, to describe the sender of the letter, since Dr. Jekyll... (full context)
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Utterson usually relies on himself in affairs of his own clients, but this time, he wishes... (full context)
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Utterson’s servant then brings him a note from Dr. Jekyll. Guest’s curiosity is piqued and he... (full context)
Chapter 6
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...and tales surface about Mr. Hyde’s past misdemeanors, but as Hyde continues to be absent, Utterson’s concern calm down and Dr. Jekyll begins to be more social. Jekyll goes back to... (full context)
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...for two months. In January, Dr. Jekyll holds a dinner party for some friends including Utterson and Lanyon and it seems just like old times. But the next three times Utterson... (full context)
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...He comments that if we were to know everything, we wouldn’t fear dying so much. Utterson mentions that Jekyll is suffering too, but Lanyon declares that he is done with Jekyll,... (full context)
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Utterson decides to write to Dr. Jekyll, demanding answers. Jekyll replies in a long, tragic letter.... (full context)
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Dr. Lanyon is, as he predicted, dead within a couple of weeks. After the funeral, Utterson, in an emotional state, sits down in his study and brings out a letter from... (full context)
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From then on, Utterson thinks of Dr. Jekyll with a sense of trepidation. He continues to try to visit... (full context)
Chapter 7
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Mr. Utterson and Mr. Enfield are on another of their Sunday walks and again pass by the... (full context)
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Dr. Jekyll sees them, and tells Utterson that he is very low. Utterson blames Jekyll's condition on staying indoors and invites his... (full context)
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...is possessed by a strange expression of terror, suddenly rushes off, and does not return. Utterson and Mr. Enfield are shaken They leave Jekyll’s courtyard and walk silently. Finally all Utterson... (full context)
Chapter 8
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One evening, Utterson receives a surprise visit from Poole. Seeing that the servant looks ill, Utterson asks what... (full context)
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Utterson kindly pushes Poole for an answer and Poole replies that he believes some kind of... (full context)
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Utterson follows Poole through the moonlit, windy nighttime air to the square. The moon, the wind... (full context)
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...– all the servants have gathered and are huddling in fear. As they spot Mr. Utterson, they exclaim in relief to see their old acquaintance. Utterson is shocked to find them... (full context)
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Poole leads Utterson with a candle to the garden, in between the main building and Jekyll’s laboratory. He... (full context)
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Utterson notices that Jekyll’s voice is changed, and Poole comments that it is not merely changed... (full context)
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...but each time, he has been unsatisfied with the results of the drugs. Poole shows Utterson an example of one of these notes, in which the man on behalf of Dr.... (full context)
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Utterson sees that the handwriting is identical to Dr. Jekyll’s, and Poole says they need not... (full context)
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Utterson speaks with hope, but Poole is certain – even in their brief encounter, he saw... (full context)
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Utterson makes clear to Poole that they are about to put themselves in grave danger. Because... (full context)
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Utterson calls in Bradshaw, a footman of Jekyll's, and asks him to stand on guard outside... (full context)
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Utterson now shouts out to Jekyll that he demands to see him, and that he will... (full context)
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...laboratory building, but find nothing. Poole thinks that Jekyll’s body must instead be buried somewhere. Utterson entertains the idea that Jekyll may have somehow escaped, but finds the door locked and... (full context)
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They examine Jekyll’s desk and find a letter addressed to Utterson. Inside are several documents, including another will, much like the previous one but this time... (full context)
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Utterson reads the letter. Jekyll writes that if Utterson is reading these words it means that... (full context)
Chapter 9
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...cannot sleep, and he feels that death is imminent. The last thing he will assure Utterson of is that the man that arrived at his house that night was Mr. Hyde. (full context)