Jude the Obscure

Jude the Obscure

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Sue Bridehead Character Analysis

The novel’s other protagonist and Jude’s cousin. Sue’s parents were divorced and she was raised in London and Christminster. She is an extremely intelligent woman who rejects Christianity and flirts with paganism, despite working as a religious artist and then teacher. Sue is often described as “ethereal” and “bodiless” and she generally lacks sexual passion, especially compared to Jude. Sue marries Phillotson as a kind of rebuke to Jude for his own marriage to Arabella, and is then repulsed by Phillotson as a husband. She is portrayed as inconsistent and emotional, often changing her mind abruptly, but she develops a strong relationship and love with Jude. Though she starts out nonreligious, the death of her children drives Sue to a harsh, legalistic version of Christianity as she believes she is being punished for her earlier rebellion against Christianity, and she returns to Phillotson even though she never ceases to love Jude.

Sue Bridehead Quotes in Jude the Obscure

The Jude the Obscure quotes below are all either spoken by Sue Bridehead or refer to Sue Bridehead. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Marriage Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Penguin Classics edition of Jude the Obscure published in 1998.
Part 3, Chapter 1 Quotes

“Cathedral? Yes. Though I think I’d rather sit in the railway station,” she answered, a remnant of vexation still in her voice. “That’s the centre of the town life now: the Cathedral has had its day!”
“How modern you are!”
“So would you be if you had lived so much in the middle ages as I have done these last few years! The Cathedral was a very good place four or five centuries ago; but it is played out now… I am not modern, either. I am more ancient than mediaevalism, if you only knew.”

Related Characters: Jude Fawley (speaker), Sue Bridehead (speaker)
Page Number: 135
Explanation and Analysis:

Jude and Sue have met in Melchester, and Jude has learned of Sue's engagement to Phillotson. Although he is devastated, Jude attempts to appear happy for Sue, and suggests that they visit the cathedral together. In this passage, Sue admits that she'd rather "sit in the railway station," as "that's the centre of the town life now." Despite this straightforwardly modern statement, when Jude remarks that Sue is "modern," she corrects him, saying she is "more ancient than mediaevalism." Why does Sue deny that she is modern, after associating herself with the train station, one of the key symbols of modernity?

Part of the reason is that Sue's wild, free spirit is associated with paganism. Her fierce character is closer to the rugged natural world than to the industrial, urban landscapes we associate with modernity. In addition, Sue's dismissal of modernity is also perhaps the result of the pessimism that defines the novel. Although Jude the Obscureis highly critical of Victorian culture and norms, it resists romanticizing the future as a time in which the problems of the Victorian era will be resolved. Indeed, the suicide of Little Father Time is a good indicator of the extent to which the novel presents a pessimistic view of the future.

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Part 3, Chapter 4 Quotes

You prove it in your own person. You are one of the very men Christminster was intended for when the colleges were founded; a man with a passion for learning, but no money, or opportunities, or friends. But you were elbowed off the pavement by the millionaires’ sons.

Related Characters: Sue Bridehead (speaker), Jude Fawley
Related Symbols: Christminster
Page Number: 151
Explanation and Analysis:

Sue is staying at Jude's house, although he has had to hide her from his landlady in order to avoid a scandal. The pair have discussed their education, and Jude has realized that Sue is more widely-read than he is. Sue has described to Jude how she lived platonically with a Christminster undergraduate who was in love with her; however, she did not love him, and he died of what Sue suspects was a broken heart. In this passage, Sue tells Jude that she believes he (Jude) is "one of the very men Christminster was intended for when the colleges were founded," but that the original ideal of accessible education has been corrupted by exclusivity and elitism.

Once again, Sue shows a level of insight and maturity that makes Jude look naïve in comparison. She understands the paradox at the heart of Christminster and other elite educational institutions: although they have the potential to promote progressive values and social mobility, they are taken over by "the millionaires' sons" and thus remain a privilege only afforded to the wealthy. Note the similarity of Sue's critique to Christminster to critiques of the way Christianity has changed since its earliest forms in the centuries after Christ's death. It is certainly possible to draw a parallel between the way that both religious and educational institutions have egalitarian ideals at their core, but are corrupted by elitism, exclusion, and the desire for power.

Part 3, Chapter 7 Quotes

I have been looking at the marriage service in the Prayer-book, and it seems to me very humiliating that a giver-away should be required at all. According to the ceremony as there printed, my bridegroom chooses me of his own will and pleasure; but I don’t choose him. Somebody gives me to him, like a she-ass or she-goat, or any other domestic animal. Bless your exalted views of woman, O Churchman!

Related Characters: Sue Bridehead (speaker)
Page Number: 170
Explanation and Analysis:

Sue has sent Jude a rather formal letter informing him that she will soon marry Phillotson. She then sends another letter asking if, as her only male relative who is married, Jude will "give her away" at her wedding. She adds that she finds the concept of being given away "very humiliating," and objects to other parts of the marriage service, such as the notion that the bridegroom chooses the bride, but the bride herself is passively given "like a she-ass or she-goat." Once again, Sue has revealed a kind of proto-feminist consciousness and affinity with contemporary critiques of the institution of marriage. Her intelligence leads her to understand that even seemingly innocuous elements of the marriage ceremony fundamentally belittle women.

Furthermore, Sue is unequivocal in her condemnation of the sexism of religion. She exclaims sarcastically, "Bless your exalted views of woman, O Churchman!". Note that, once again, this criticism coheres with contemporary feminist critique of the sexism within organized religion. Although this critique is rather common now, it would have been highly scandalous at the time Jude the Obscurewas written.

Part 4, Chapter 2 Quotes

Jude, before I married him I had never thought out fully what marriage meant, even though I knew… I am certain one ought to be allowed to undo what one has done so ignorantly. I daresay it happens to lots of women; only they submit, and I kick… When people of a later age look back upon the barbarous customs and superstitions of the times that we have the unhappiness to live in, what will they say!

Related Characters: Sue Bridehead (speaker), Jude Fawley, Richard Phillotson
Page Number: 215
Explanation and Analysis:

Jude and Sue's aunt has died, and they have met in Marygreen for the funeral. Sue has confessed that she likes Phillotson as a friend but finds him repulsive as a husband. She tells Jude that she wishes it were possible "to undo what one has done so ignorantly," and that she believes people in the future will look back on marriage as a "barbarous custom." Although Sue has previously claimed to be more pagan than modern, in this passage she strongly identifies herself with a more enlightened, fair, and rational future that she imagines will follow the era in which she lives. Note the similarity between Sue's objection to marriage and that expressed by Jude; both point to the absurdity of committing forever to feelings that can change so quickly.

Part 4, Chapter 3 Quotes

“What is the use of thinking of laws and ordinances,” she burst out, “if they make you miserable when you know you are committing no sin?”
“But you are committing a sin in not liking me.”
“I do like you! But I didn’t reflect it would be – that it would be so much more than that… For a man and woman to live on intimate terms when one feels as I do is adultery, in any circumstances, however legal. There – I’ve said it!... Will you let me, Richard?”

Related Characters: Sue Bridehead (speaker), Richard Phillotson (speaker)
Page Number: 222
Explanation and Analysis:

Jude and Sue have parted ways, kissing passionately before doing so. Jude has decided that, since he loves Sue so fiercely, he cannot join the clergy; meanwhile, Sue is tormented by her feelings for Jude, and hides from Phillotson in a closet. Phillotson confronts her, and Sue tells him vaguely that she is "miserable" and that living intimately with him would constitute "adultery... however legal." Sue's words reveal her strong opposition to legalistic understandings of morality. Rather than judge her own behavior against moral rules and societal norms, Sue evaluates her situation as individual and unique. At the same time, it is clear that she is very much concerned with morality, a concern made evident by her reference to adultery and "sin."

Part 5, Chapter 3 Quotes

Jude, do you think that when you must have me with you by law, we shall be so happy as we are now? The men and women of our family are very generous when everything depends upon their good-will, but they always kick against compulsion. Don’t you dread the attitude that insensibly arises out of legal obligation? Don’t you think it is destructive to a passion whose essence is its gratuitousness?

Related Characters: Sue Bridehead (speaker), Jude Fawley
Page Number: 272
Explanation and Analysis:

Sue has spoken with Arabella, who advised her to marry Jude. However, this has only further convinced Sue that marriage is a "vulgar institution." In response, Jude has remarked that Sue seems more like someone from an ancient civilization than the Christian era in which she lives. Yet Sue continues to confess her doubts about marriage, asking Jude if he thinks he would continue to love her if they got married, and reminding him that there is a history of resistance to "compulsion" within their family. Once again, Sue raises the notion that the legalistic nature of marriage can destroy "passion," happiness, and love. Although she conveys a more generous view of hers and Jude's family than Arabella, she clearly feels concerned about the familial legacy of divorce and how it might influence her own fate.

Part 5, Chapter 4 Quotes

“Nobody thought o’ being afeared o’ matrimony in my time, nor of much else but a cannon-ball or empty cupboard. Why when I and my poor man were married we thought no more o’t than of a game o’ dibs.”
“Don’t tell the child when he comes in,” whispered Sue nervously. “He’ll think it has all gone on right, and it will be better that he should not be surprised and puzzled. Of course it is only put off for reconsideration. If we are happy as we are, what does it matter to anybody?”

Related Characters: Sue Bridehead (speaker), The Widow Edlin (speaker), Little Father Time
Related Symbols: Little Father Time
Page Number: 288
Explanation and Analysis:

Jude and Sue have adopted Little Father Time, and begun the process of getting married; however, the Widow Edlin has told a story about an unhappy marriage in their family that causes them to doubt whether they should proceed, and eventually they decide to postpone the wedding. In this passage, the Widow Edlin comments that nobody was afraid of marriage in the old days, and treated the whole matter casually. This illustrates the way in which Sue and Jude are distinctly modern figures, representing a new era. Unlike the Widow, they place a great deal of emphasis on the emotional aspect of marriage, and how it might change their relationship.

Meanwhile, Sue pleads that the Widow not mention the fact that she and Jude did not go through with the marriage to Little Father Time. Although she strives to live freely and unconventionally in her own life, Sue is evidently concerned with how this lifestyle will affect her adopted son. While she claims that "If we are happy as we are, what does it matter to anybody?", it is evident that Sue realizes that it does matter, even if she disagrees with the logic people use to judge unmarried couples. Overall, this passage confirms the difficulty of negotiating a life that runs counter to societal norms and expectations.

Part 5, Chapter 5 Quotes

I feel that we have returned to Greek joyousness, and have blinded ourselves to sickness and sorrow, and have forgotten what twenty-five centuries have taught the race since their time, as one of your Christminster luminaries says…

Related Characters: Sue Bridehead (speaker)
Related Symbols: Christminster
Page Number: 297
Explanation and Analysis:

Jude, Sue, and Little Father Time are at the Wessex Agricultural Show, along with Arabella and her husband Cartlett. Jude and Sue seem incredibly happy together, and have even reached a point where they can communicate without speaking. Arabella, meanwhile, has grown to resent Cartlett, and looks on at Jude and Sue with a mix of envy and disdain. In this passage, Sue describes her happiness with Jude, saying that they have "returned to Greek joyousness," meaning that they have managed to conduct their lives with a kind of pagan freedom and joy, free from the constrictions of Victorian social codes and Christian morality. The contrast between Sue and Jude and Arabella and Cartlett supports Sue's view, suggesting that marriage truly does often destroy couples' feelings for one another.

Sue's statement that she and Jude have "forgotten" the lessons of the past twenty-five centuries suggests that they have returned to a more innocent, joyful state of existence. However, Sue's happiness seems almost too good to last, as the rest of the narrative will prove. Although it may indeed be the case that people's lives are happier without marriage and other legalistic social customs, the novel also shows how difficult––even impossible––it is to live against the dominant norms of one's era.

Part 6, Chapter 2 Quotes

“It would almost be better to be out o’ the world than in it, wouldn’t it?”
“It would almost, dear.”
“’Tis because of us children, too, isn’t it, that you can’t get a good lodging.”
“Well – people do object to children sometimes.”
“Then if children make so much trouble, why do people have ‘em?”
“O – because it is a law of nature.”
“But we don’t ask to be born?”
“No indeed.”
“And what makes it worse with me is that you are not my real mother, and you needn’t have had me unless you liked. I oughtn’t to have come to ‘ee – that’s the real truth! I troubled ‘em in Australia; and I trouble folk here. I wish I hadn’t been born!”

Related Characters: Sue Bridehead (speaker), Little Father Time (speaker)
Related Symbols: Christminster, Little Father Time
Page Number: 333
Explanation and Analysis:

In Christminster, Sue, Jude and the children have been refused lodging because of the fact that Sue and Jude aren't married. Sue is deeply depressed, and in this passage talks to Little Father Time about the difficulty of life. Although she doesn't mean to, Sue inadvertently confirms Little Father Time's suspicions that she and Jude would be better off if the children didn't exist. (This will eventually lead to Little Father Time's horrific murder-suicide.) The boy's world-weary personality suggests that, despite his young age, he understands the world better than the adults around him. Aspects of life that adults don't question––such as why people have children, given that life is so hard––trouble Little Father Time. His philosophical reflections on these matters show both his intelligence and his deep pessimism about life.

We said – do you remember? – that we would make a virtue of joy. I said it was Nature’s intention. Nature’s law and raison d’etre that we should be joyful in what instincts she afforded us – instincts which civilization had taken upon itself to thwart. What dreadful things I said! And now Fate has given us this stab in the back for being such fools as to take Nature at her word!

Related Characters: Sue Bridehead (speaker), Jude Fawley
Related Symbols: Little Father Time
Page Number: 339
Explanation and Analysis:

Following Little Father Time's murder-suicide, Jude and Sue have gone to view the children's bodies. They hear an organ playing a hymn, and Sue comments that it feels as though a force is punishing them for the way they have behaved. In this passage, Sue continues to fixate on the idea that "Fate has given us this stab in the back for being such fools." This is a crucial turning point in Sue's attitude toward faith, freedom, and morality. Whereas before the children's deaths Sue staunchly associated herself with a kind of "ancient," pagan atheism, the trajectory of her life has caused her to experience a crisis in which she believes she is being punished by God.

This passage displays not only Sue's sudden turn to religiosity but also her newfound sense of pessimism. In previous years, Sue justified her nonconformist lifestyle by claiming that she was living according to natural instincts. Now, however, she suddenly sees nature as deceitful and cruel, and exclaims in shame about the "dreadful things" she used to think.

Part 6, Chapter 3 Quotes

“I see marriage differently now!... My babies have been taken from me to show me this! Arabella’s child killing mine was a judgment; the right slaying the wrong. What, what shall I do! I am such a vile creature – too worthless to mix with ordinary human beings.”
…He returned vehemently… “You make me hate Christianity, or mysticism, or Sacerdotalism, or whatever it may be called, if it’s that which has caused this deterioration in you. That a woman-poet, a woman-seer, a woman whose soul shone like a diamond – whom all the wise of the world would have been proud of, if they could have known you – should degrade herself like this! I am glad I had nothing to do with Divinity – damn glad – if it’s going to ruin you in this way!”

Related Characters: Jude Fawley (speaker), Sue Bridehead (speaker), Arabella Donn, Little Father Time
Related Symbols: Little Father Time
Page Number: 350
Explanation and Analysis:

Following the children's deaths, Sue and Jude and have moved to Beersheba, where they live in a state of depression and despair. Sue has declared that they are being punished by God, and thus have "no choice" but to "conform." In this passage, Sue explains her dramatic change of heart, telling Jude that she interprets Little Father Time killing her children as "the right slaying the wrong." Jude responds by telling Sue that she makes him "hate Christianity, or mysticism, or Sacerdotalism," and feel glad that he's not religious. Jude's reply is interesting, as it highlights the fact that he has now taken on Sue's previous beliefs wholeheartedly, and is indeed defending them from Sue herself. Jude and Sue have switched places, and Jude is now the one speaking with Hardy's skeptical and pessimistic but defiant voice.

Part 6, Chapter 5 Quotes

It was like a re-enactment by the ghosts of their former selves of the similar scene which had taken place at Melchester years before. When the books were signed the vicar congratulated the husband and wife on having performed a noble, and righteous, and mutually forgiving act. “All’s well that ends well,” he said smiling. “May you long be happy together, after thus having been ‘saved as by fire.’”

Related Characters: Sue Bridehead, Richard Phillotson
Page Number: 369
Explanation and Analysis:

Sue has decided to remarry Phillotson, although she is still physically repulsed by him, panicked about the prospect of being married, and in love with Jude. Even Phillotson begins to doubt whether the marriage is a good idea, but eventually decides that they must go ahead with it in order to conform to societal expectations. This passage describes the ceremony, during which the priest's positivity contrasts distinctly with the doubt, misery, and fear felt by the bride and groom. The priest's declaration that "all's well that ends well" is devastatingly ironic considering all that has happened and how unhappy an "ending" this is. This confirms the notion that societal conventions such as marriage are not designed with people's best interests at heart, but rather function as a way to force people to conform to legalistic understandings of religion and morality.

Part 6, Chapter 8 Quotes

We’ve both re-married out of our senses. I was made drunk to do it. You were the same. I was gin-drunk; you were creed-drunk. Either form of intoxication takes away the nobler vision. Let us then shake off our mistakes, and run away together!

Related Characters: Jude Fawley (speaker), Sue Bridehead
Page Number: 390
Explanation and Analysis:

Both Jude and Sue have remarried their original partners, Arabella and Phillotson, although they secretly remain in love with one another. Jude has developed a respiratory illness and, knowing he will soon die, travels to Marygreen to see Sue. They meet in the church and argue at first, before kissing passionately. In this passage, Jude tells Arabella that they were both "drunk" when they got remarried; Sue was drunk on religion, and Jude on gin. He suggests that he and Sue run away together, showing that despite everything that has happened, Jude has still not relinquished his desire to be with Sue and live against societal customs.

Indeed, this passage shows that despite his nihilistic cynicism, Jude simultaneously remains a romantic idealist. His dream of running away with Sue is hardly realistic, especially considering Jude is extremely sick and was barely able to make the journey to Marygreen. Furthermore, Jude seems to believe that Sue's conversion to a dogmatic, legalistic strain of Christianity is a temporary state of being, like getting drunk. He refuses to accept that Sue will never go back to the version of herself Jude used to know.

Part 6, Chapter 10 Quotes

As for Sue and me when we were at our best, long ago – when our minds were clear, and our love of truth fearless – the time was not ripe for us! Our ideas were fifty years too soon to be any good to us. And so the resistance they met with brought reaction in her, and recklessness and ruin on me!

Related Characters: Jude Fawley (speaker), Sue Bridehead
Page Number: 400
Explanation and Analysis:

Time has passed, and Jude's illness has abated, before returning. Arabella has told Jude that she will allow Sue to come and see him, but Jude responds that he doesn't wish to see her. Jude then reminisces about his time with Sue, reflecting that "our minds were clear, and our love of truth fearless," but that society was not ready to handle such courage and independence. Although undeniably tragic, Jude's thoughts in this passage also contain a note of optimism. His assertion that he and Sue were "fifty years too soon" suggests that more honest and free ways of living may be possible in the near future. Unlike Sue, he also refuses to blame himself for the events that befell him, but understands that they were the result of terrible luck and a harsh, oppressive society.

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Sue Bridehead Character Timeline in Jude the Obscure

The timeline below shows where the character Sue Bridehead appears in Jude the Obscure. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1, Chapter 2
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...gone with Phillotson to Christminster, as Jude is “crazy for books” just like his cousin Sue, who lives elsewhere. Drusilla says that Jude’s parents had divorced, and she advises the young... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 1
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...his tools. He was partly motivated to move by seeing a portrait of his cousin, Sue Bridehead, at his aunt’s house. Sue lives in Christminster, though he doesn’t know where. (full context)
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...next morning he remembers that he is here to find Mr. Phillotson and his cousin Sue. (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 2
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Jude is discouraged and asks his aunt to send the portrait of Sue. Drusilla does so, but she warns Jude not to try to find Sue. Jude decides... (full context)
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...first priority should be to save up money. His aunt sends another letter warning about Sue, but Jude decides to go see Sue anyway. He learns that she works as a... (full context)
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Afterwards Jude often follows Sue or seeks out her presence, but she doesn’t notice that he is there. He admires... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 3
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Jude learns that Sue goes to the church services of the Cardinal College, and he goes there to find... (full context)
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The narrative jumps back a few days, when Sue had a holiday and was walking through the country. She comes across a man selling... (full context)
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Miss Fontover asks Sue about the package she is carrying, and Sue lies and says she bought statues of... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 4
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...tombstones. One day he is on a ladder working at a church, and he sees Sue with Miss Fontover at the service inside. His passion for Sue grows stronger in the... (full context)
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One afternoon Sue comes to the stonemason’s yard while Jude is away, and she asks for Jude Fawley.... (full context)
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Jude asks Sue if she knows Mr. Phillotson (whom he assumes is a parson), but she says she... (full context)
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...in need of a pupil-teacher. The three talk for a while and then Jude and Sue return to Christminster. (full context)
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As they walk home Jude is struck by “what a revelation of woman” Sue is, and he realizes he is even more in love with her than before. Jude... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 5
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Sue starts working for Phillotson right away. It is part of his responsibility to give her... (full context)
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They examine the model and Sue wonders why Jerusalem should be so honored over Athens, Rome, or Alexandria. Suddenly she notices... (full context)
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On Friday Jude goes out to meet Sue and Phillotson, but as he (unseen) watches them approaching he sees Phillotson put his arm... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 6
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...Jude returns to Marygreen to visit her. Drusilla is angry that Jude has been visiting Sue, and tells Jude some stories about how immodest and precocious Sue was as a child.... (full context)
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...him, but only for the luck upper classes. Jude wishes he could at least have Sue to console him in his depression. (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 7
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The next day Jude feels like a fool. He thinks that Sue is the only soul he truly has an affinity with, but she is forever cut... (full context)
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...he storms out of the bar. Jude, still drunk, walks to Lumsdon and knocks on Sue’s door. Sue lets him in and calms him down, putting him to bed and promising... (full context)
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Jude wakes up at dawn and is ashamed that Sue has seen him in this state, so he slips out of the house without waking... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 1
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...to his soul. Jude is slightly cheered by this decision. He gets a letter from Sue, who tells him that she is going to enter a Training College in the town... (full context)
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...of the year, as he will have to find stonemasonry work in Melchester. One day Sue writes him a letter saying that she is “lonely and miserable,” and she asks Jude... (full context)
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Jude finds Sue and they greet each other. She looks more prim and disciplined than before, but still... (full context)
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Jude is upset but he tries to congratulate Sue. She recognizes his distress and tries to downplay the marriage. Jude suggests they go sit... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 2
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One day both Jude and Sue have a day off, and they decide to take a trip together. Jude wants to... (full context)
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...night at his cottage, as it is too late to return to Melchester that night. Sue comments that she enjoys the shepherd’s simple, naturalistic life, and especially his great freedom. Jude... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 3
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The women of Sue’s strict Training College see that she has not returned at night, and they gossip about... (full context)
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Meanwhile Sue arrives at Jude’s lodgings, freezing and soaked through from crossing the river. Jude is reading... (full context)
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Jude feels that he and Sue are “counterparts,” as she came to him in her time of need. He gives her... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 4
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Jude’s landlady comes upstairs to ask about dinner, and Jude hides Sue from her. He offers that Sue stay the night. They eat supper and Sue reminds... (full context)
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Sue tells Jude that she used to live platonically with an undergraduate, who lent her books.... (full context)
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Afterwards Sue had lost her money and then moved to Christminster to the design shop. Jude calls... (full context)
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Jude is stung by Sue’s criticism of his ideal, but Sue says that he is the kind of person who... (full context)
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Jude calls Sue “Voltairean” (thinking like the philosopher Voltaire), and is struck by her unorthodox ideas. They argue... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 5
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Jude returns to his room to find Sue dressed and ready to leave. She is suddenly worried what Phillotson will think of her... (full context)
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Jude goes home, depressed, but the next morning he gets a letter from Sue saying that he can love her if he wants to. Jude is greatly encouraged by... (full context)
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Jude discusses his forbidden love for Sue, and the narrator comments that he ought to kiss her, but he does not. Jude... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 6
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Meanwhile Phillotson is thinking about how he has abandoned his earlier plans for Sue’s sake. One day he sets out to visit her at the Training School, but when... (full context)
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Phillotson asks Jude about Sue, and Jude assures him that nothing has happened between them, though he hints that he... (full context)
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Sue acts coldly towards Jude, and he remarks that she is nicer in her letters than... (full context)
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Jude and Sue walk around town, and Jude says that Arabella is the only obstacle between them. Sue... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 7
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Two days later Sue sends Jude a letter saying that she is marrying Phillotson in a few weeks. She... (full context)
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Jude agrees to give Sue away, and offers that she and Phillotson stay at his lodgings in Melchester. Sue arrives... (full context)
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Jude takes Sue to visit the church where she is to marry Phillotson, and she walks down the... (full context)
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Jude is struck again by the cruelty of having him give Sue away to Phillotson, and he wonders why Sue keeps inflicting pain on herself and others... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 8
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...great-aunt is ill again, and he returns to Marygreen to see her. Jude writes to Sue, as Drusilla is her relation as well, and he suggests that they meet in Alfredston,... (full context)
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The next day Jude goes to Christminster and is haunted by Sue’s “phantom” presence there, which affects him much more than the philosophers he used to imagine.... (full context)
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...at nine, after she gets off work. Jude misses his train and his meeting with Sue, but he recognizes that his lawful duty is to show preference to Arabella over Sue,... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 9
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Jude returns to the station and encounters Sue, who is distraught. She thought that Jude had missed their meeting because he was drinking... (full context)
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Sue and Jude ride the train to Alfredston together, and Jude asks her about her marriage... (full context)
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Jude takes Sue to the train station so she can return to Melchester. He asks if he can... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 10
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...Jude leaves, feeling ashamed, and when he returns to Melchester he finds a note from Sue apologizing and inviting him to dinner. Jude writes back and they agree to meet a... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 1
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The narrator describes the town of Shaston, where Sue now lives, as a place of worldly pleasures. Jude arrives there and comes to the... (full context)
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...struck by the similarity of their natures. They spontaneously hold hands several times. Jude accuses Sue of being a flirt sometimes and she is offended by this, but she admits that... (full context)
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Sue tells Jude to come back the following week and she sends him away. Jude wanders... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 2
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The next morning Sue sends Jude a letter retracting her invitation for the following week, saying they were “too... (full context)
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Sue arrives in Marygreen for the funeral a few days later. After the ceremony Jude and... (full context)
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Jude apologizes to Sue for not warning her about marrying Phillotson. Jude and Sue vaguely discuss their relationship, and... (full context)
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Jude pushes his face against Sue’s cheek and asks if she would have married him if not for his first marriage... (full context)
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Jude talks to her, and Sue admits that she was already sleepless worrying about her marital troubles. Jude says that he... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 3
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The next day Jude and Sue part ways in the road, go a few yards, and then run back to each... (full context)
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...feels cleansed by this, like “an ordinary sinner, and not as a whited sepulchre.” Meanwhile Sue weeps on the train to Shaston, promising to herself to break off all contact with... (full context)
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Phillotson meets Sue at the station, and Sue admits to him that she held Jude’s hand, but says... (full context)
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Phillotson is surprised and questions Sue’s reasons, and she explains how she felt forced into the marriage by the opinion of... (full context)
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Phillotson asks if Sue plans to live alone, and she admits that she wants to live with Jude. Phillotson... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 4
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One night Phillotson stays up late and accidentally returns to the room he shared with Sue out of habit. Sue is so distraught by his sudden appearance that she jumps out... (full context)
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...fact that his wife is repulsed by him. He describes Jude, saying that Jude and Sue “seem to be one person split in two.” Phillotson says that Sue’s intellect is far... (full context)
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...thing to do, though it goes against law and tradition. Phillotson again describes Jude and Sue’s relationship, comparing them to characters in a poem by Shelley (lovers who are also siblings),... (full context)
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...he personally feels is right. As Phillotson leaves, Gillingham advises him to hold on to Sue no matter what, but Phillotson is not convinced. (full context)
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The next morning Phillotson tells Sue that she is free to leave and do as she pleases. She is very grateful... (full context)
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Phillotson sends Sue off to the train station and pretends to kiss her as they part. Later that... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 5
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Jude meets Sue at the train station in Melchester, and he tells her that they are traveling on... (full context)
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...Jude reveals that he has booked one room for them at the Temperance Hotel, and Sue is upset by this. She hints that she doesn’t want to have a sexual relationship... (full context)
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Jude shows Sue a note he received from Phillotson, asking that Jude be kind to Sue and affirming... (full context)
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Sue then asks Jude if they can stay at a different hotel, and Jude accuses her... (full context)
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...though he doesn’t notice this. When Jude is out of the room, a maid tells Sue that she saw Jude there with a different woman a month or two earlier. Sue... (full context)
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Sue breaks down crying, saying that she jumped out the window rather than sleep with Phillotson.... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 6
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...chairman of his school summons him to ask about his marriage. Phillotson admits to letting Sue leave with her lover, as he was “not her gaoler.” Afterward Phillotson is asked to... (full context)
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Gillingham convinces Phillotson to write to Sue about his illness, and a few days later she visits him. Their reunion is painful,... (full context)
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Afterwards Gillingham visits Phillotson, and Phillotson tells him that he has decided to formally divorce Sue. He recognizes that he probably can’t teach anymore because of his disgrace, but he might... (full context)
Part 5, Chapter 1
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A few months later Jude and Sue are still living in separate but adjacent rooms in Aldbrickham. They get a letter saying... (full context)
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Jude and Sue walk about together for a while, and then Jude asks Sue if she will marry... (full context)
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Jude responds that this might do for the “phantasmal, bodiless” Sue, but ordinary folk like him sometimes need marriage. He then says that Sue still hasn’t... (full context)
Part 5, Chapter 2
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One night Jude returns home and Sue tells him a woman came to ask for him. Sue thinks that it was Arabella,... (full context)
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Sue begs Jude not to go, but Jude feels his usual sympathy for Arabella. They argue... (full context)
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The next morning Sue feels guilty for having treated Arabella so badly, and she wants to go find her... (full context)
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Before leaving, Arabella advises Sue to marry Jude, listing all the practical ways that marriage will help her properly ensnare... (full context)
Part 5, Chapter 3
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Sue returns to Jude and tells him that her conversation with Arabella has further convinced her... (full context)
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...more and the boy is “of an intelligent age” now. Arabella asks if Jude and Sue will take the child in, as Arabella and her new husband (Cartlett) don’t want him. (full context)
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Sue is upset by the plight of the unwanted child, and she asks Jude if they... (full context)
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The child reaches the house just as Jude and Sue are going to bed, and they are surprised to see him. They apologize for not... (full context)
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The child immediately asks Sue if he can call her “mother,” and the two strike up a quick affection for... (full context)
Part 5, Chapter 4
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...is disturbed by this, but he decides to christen the boy “Jude” when he and Sue are married. Jude and Sue go to the office that day and fill out the... (full context)
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...the child’s coffin and was arrested for burglary. After this story Little Father Time advises Sue not to marry. (full context)
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The next day Sue feels even more of a sense of “tragic doom,” as if the Fawleys were like... (full context)
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Sue apologizes for her inconsistency, and they go to the parish church where a wedding is... (full context)
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Sue and Jude return home, having failed to actually get married. The Widow Edlin comments on... (full context)
Part 5, Chapter 5
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For a while Jude and Sue are happy together, though Little Father Time remains gloomy and world-weary. One day there is... (full context)
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Arabella scornfully says that Little Father Time can’t be Sue’s child, as Sue and Jude haven’t been married long enough. Cartlett still has no idea... (full context)
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...She runs into her old friend Anny and then Physician Vilbert, and they all discuss Sue and Jude. (full context)
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Arabella watches Sue and Jude observing a model of Christminster that they themselves built, and Arabella mocks Jude’s... (full context)
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Meanwhile Jude and Sue keep admiring things at the agricultural show and commenting on their own happiness. Sue is... (full context)
Part 5, Chapter 6
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Jude and Sue’s private life becomes more of a subject for gossip, and soon everyone in town knows... (full context)
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One day Jude is hired to reletter the Ten Commandments at a nearby church, and Sue comes along to help him. While they are working Little Father Time comes in, crying... (full context)
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...couple decides to move away. They sell all their furniture at auction, and Jude and Sue remain upstairs with Little Father Time. They overhear all the townspeople discussing their personal lives.... (full context)
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Jude and Sue leave the house just as the auctioneer is selling two pigeons Sue kept as pets.... (full context)
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Afterwards Sue feels guilty and confesses to Jude, and she laments aloud that the law of Nature... (full context)
Part 5, Chapter 7
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After leaving Aldbrickham Jude and Sue lead an almost nomadic lifestyle, moving from town to town and working. Almost three years... (full context)
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One day Arabella arrives at the Kennetbridge spring fair dressed in mourning. She sees Sue there selling cakes with Little Father Time, and Arabella approaches them, saying that she is... (full context)
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Sue says that Jude became ill doing stonework, so now he makes cakes in the shape... (full context)
Part 5, Chapter 8
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...leaves with Anny. On the way back to Alfredston Arabella reveals that her talk with Sue has made her very jealous. After passing the house where she lived with Jude, Arabella... (full context)
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...says he is the schoolmaster at Marygreen again. Arabella tells him about her meeting with Sue, and she says that Sue is unhappy and that he never should have let her... (full context)
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Meanwhile Sue goes home, where the Widow Edlin is tending to the sick Jude. Sue tells Jude... (full context)
Part 6, Chapter 1
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Three weeks later Jude and Sue arrive at Christminster with their two children and Little Father Time, who has been officially... (full context)
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It starts to rain and Sue, who has grown emotional at Jude’s words, wants them to go look for lodgings. Jude... (full context)
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Jude and Sue wander about looking for lodging, but they are turned away. Little Father Time declares that... (full context)
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After Sue and the children enter, the landlady asks Sue about her marital situation. Sue admits that... (full context)
Part 6, Chapter 2
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They return to their room and Sue is in a deep depression, looking out the window at Sarcophagus College and wondering at... (full context)
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Little Father Time questions Sue about life, and she affirms that everything is trouble and suffering. She says it would... (full context)
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Sue wakes up early the next morning and goes to find Jude, who has found a... (full context)
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...bed, and then he runs off to find a doctor. When he returns he finds Sue and the landlady trying to revive the children, but they are all dead. On the... (full context)
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Jude talks to the doctor and then informs Sue that there is no hope for the children. The doctor had said that it was... (full context)
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...They hear an organ in a nearby church playing “Truly God is loving unto Israel.” Sue breaks down again and declares that there seems to be an external force punishing them... (full context)
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Sue weeps and tells Jude about her conversation with Little Father Time the night before. She... (full context)
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Sue stays in bed while the children are buried, but she appears at the burial’s end... (full context)
Part 6, Chapter 3
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Jude and Sue find lodgings in the Beersheba district, and Jude finds some stonemasonry work. They spend much... (full context)
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Sue is fixated on the idea that they are being punished, and she decides that she... (full context)
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Sue says she wishes she could take back all her unorthodox views and formidable intellect. Jude... (full context)
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...visited the children’s graves but didn’t feel comfortable coming to the funeral. Arabella offhandedly describes Sue as Jude’s wife, but Sue denies this and leaves. Arabella tells Jude that her father... (full context)
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Meanwhile Sue has disappeared, and Jude goes to look for her at the church, though it is... (full context)
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Jude responds by lamenting that the once brilliant, wise Sue has so degraded herself, and he tells her that she is making him hate religion.... (full context)
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Jude accuses Sue of never having really loved him. She says she does love him, but she started... (full context)
Part 6, Chapter 4
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...Marygreen ruminating on his encounter with Arabella. He reads about the deaths of Jude and Sue’s children in the newspaper. Later he meets Arabella again, as she has moved back to... (full context)
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Phillotson writes to Sue and asks her to come to Marygreen. He also writes that he has suffered for... (full context)
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One day Sue comes to Jude’s lodgings and asks him to come out and meet her. They go... (full context)
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They reach the graves of their children, and Sue says that they died to show her the error of her ways. She tells Jude... (full context)
Part 6, Chapter 5
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...Christminster is covered in fog and Jude is too depressed to go to work. Meanwhile Sue takes the train to Marygreen and arrives like a supplicant at Phillotson’s house. Phillotson welcomes... (full context)
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Sue catches sight of the marriage contract on a desk, and she inadvertently cries out in... (full context)
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Meanwhile Gillingham congratulates Phillotson on winning Sue back. Phillotson has second thoughts, recognizing Sue’s reluctance, but then he decides that he too... (full context)
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The next morning Sue looks small and tired, but she goes with Phillotson to the church. They go through... (full context)
Part 6, Chapter 6
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...her in and his landlord lets her stay in the attic. Arabella tells Jude that Sue went through with her marriage to Phillotson. A few days later Jude is still depressed,... (full context)
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...returns that same day, practicing making dimples on the train ride. She tells Jude that Sue went through with the marriage, though part of her seemed against it. Arabella admits to... (full context)
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...drunk at a tavern, and she buys him more drinks. Jude laments his loss of Sue, and says that no one understands him like she did, though she has now ruined... (full context)
Part 6, Chapter 7
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...sacrifices he has made for his honor, and noting that he has done just as Sue requested in her new “true religion.” (full context)
Part 6, Chapter 8
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Jude’s condition worsens, and he asks Arabella to write Sue about his illness. Arabella protests that this is a disrespecting of the “rights and duties”... (full context)
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Arabella estimates Jude’s life “with an appraiser’s eye” and agrees to write to Sue. After a few days without Sue appearing, Jude suspects that Arabella never sent her a... (full context)
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Jude grows weaker on his journey, but he reaches Sue’s school and sends for her. She meets him in the church. Jude begs her to... (full context)
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They argue again, but suddenly Sue asks Jude to kiss her and they kiss passionately. Sue declares that she does love... (full context)
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...where he had carved the finger pointing to Christminster, and the gibbet where his and Sue’s ancestor was hanged. Then he takes the train back to Christminster. (full context)
Part 6, Chapter 9
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Arabella meets Jude at the platform, and he admits both that he has seen Sue and has basically committed suicide by traveling in the wind and rain. He is now... (full context)
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That night in Marygreen the Widow Edlin goes to Sue’s house to help her with her domestic duties. Sue confesses that she saw Jude and... (full context)
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When Mrs. Edlin is about to leave to go to bed Sue seems terrified, but then she steels herself and goes to Phillotson’s room. Sue tells Phillotson... (full context)
Part 6, Chapter 10
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...the universities are growing more accepting of lower-class students now. Arabella says she will allow Sue to come see him, but Jude says he doesn’t want to see Sue again. (full context)
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One day the Widow Edlin visits Jude, and she tells him that Sue and Phillotson have consummated their marriage, though Sue only made herself do it as a... (full context)
Part 6, Chapter 11
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Jude wakes up alone and asks for some water. He calls for both Arabella and Sue, but no one comes. He hears the festival outside and recognizes that it is Remembrance... (full context)
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...illustrious men receiving honorary degrees. Arabella asks the Widow Edlin (the only other attendee) if Sue is coming. Mrs. Edlin says that Sue swore to never see Jude again, and that... (full context)