The Fault in Our Stars

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Mrs. Lancaster Character Analysis

Hazel’s mother, Mrs. Lancaster is dedicated and loving. She exerts most of her energy caring for Hazel and learning everything she can about Hazel’s cancer. Mrs. Lancaster wants her daughter to have a normal teenage life, but is also protective and at times overbearing. Hazel fears that her death will have a devastating effect on her mother, but is relieved once she finds out that her mother has been secretly studying to become a social worker.

Mrs. Lancaster Quotes in The Fault in Our Stars

The The Fault in Our Stars quotes below are all either spoken by Mrs. Lancaster or refer to Mrs. Lancaster. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Coming of Age Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Penguin Books edition of The Fault in Our Stars published in 2014.
Chapter 1 Quotes

Late in the winter of my seventeenth year, my mother decided I was depressed, presumably because I rarely left the house, spent quite a lot of time in bed, read the same book over and over, ate infrequently, and devoted quite a bit of my abundant free time thinking about death.

Related Characters: Hazel Grace Lancaster (speaker), Mrs. Lancaster
Page Number: 3
Explanation and Analysis:

Hazel's mother becomes worried about her daughter, who seems increasingly despondent as of late. Mrs. Lancaster urges Hazel, who has terminal cancer, to see a doctor about treatment, since depression can be a side effect of a cancer diagnosis. In this quote, Hazel refutes her mother's logic, saying that depression is actually a side effect of dying rather than of cancer.

This opening to the novel shows the reader how Hazel typically spends her time: resting, reading, and thinking about her own impending mortality. It does seem that she has depressive symptoms, which is understandable given her terminal cancer. This passage has a certain resigned, even sarcastic tone to it, suggesting that though Hazel's rumination on the topic of death is not exactly healthy for her mental state, her diagnosis is something she has accepted. It also shows that her parents are frequently concerned about her, and devote much of their time to caring for their daughter. We can also surmise that Hazel likely does not interact with many teenagers her age, since she rarely leaves the house for fun. 

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Chapter 3 Quotes

I liked my mom, but her perpetual nearness sometimes made me feel weirdly nervous. And I liked Kaitlyn, too. I really did. But three years removed from proper full-time schoolic exposure to my peers, I felt a certain unbridgeable distance between us.

Related Characters: Hazel Grace Lancaster (speaker), Mrs. Lancaster, Kaitlyn
Page Number: 45
Explanation and Analysis:

Hazel goes to the mall with her friend Kaitlyn, who attends the high school Hazel would have gone to if she did not have to leave school for cancer treatment. However, she cuts their time together short, claiming she is tired. In this quote, Hazel admits that while she loves her mother and her friends, their constant hovering sensitivity about her health makes her feel an "unbridgeable distance" between herself and others. 

Unlike Augustus, whose only outward sign of cancer is a limp due to his prosthetic leg, Hazel's health is unmistakably poor: her hair is short due to recent chemo treatments, and she carts an oxygen tank with her everywhere she goes. Everyone she interacts with is constantly reminded of her fragile mortality, and treats her with much more delicacy than she wishes. Though Hazel is weak in body she is strong in nature, and she finds it hard to interact constantly with people who act like she will break at any moment. This is why she spends much of her time alone, reading the one book that she feels truly understands what she is going through. 

Chapter 6 Quotes

“I’m like. Like. I’m like a grenade, Mom. I’m a grenade and at some point I’m going to blow up and I would like to minimize the casualties, Okay…I just want to stay away from people and read books and think and be with you guys because there is nothing I can do about hurting you; you’re too invested, so just please let me do that, okay?”

Related Characters: Hazel Grace Lancaster (speaker), Mrs. Lancaster
Related Symbols: Grenade
Page Number: 99
Explanation and Analysis:

After realizing that she looks very similar to Augustus's deceased girlfriend Caroline, and seeing all of the condolence messages left on Caroline's Facebook wall, Hazel has a hard time interacting with her parents at dinner. Her mother accuses her of acting very "teenagery," and in this quote, Hazel tells her mom that she stays away from people because she is a "grenade" who could "blow up" (die) and unintentionally hurt those closest to her. 

After seeing that Caroline looks very similar to her, Hazel resolves to not engage in a relationship with Augustus, and Hazel becomes angry when her mother suggests she's been "going on dates." Hazel consciously stays away from people her own age, and particularly shies away from romantic relationships, so that she does not hurt people who may become attached to a girl with terminal cancer. She doesn't mind remaining close to her parents, because she knows their pain is inevitable. Hazel's metaphor of being a "grenade" is something that will guide many of her personal decisions towards Augustus throughout the novel. 

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Mrs. Lancaster Character Timeline in The Fault in Our Stars

The timeline below shows where the character Mrs. Lancaster appears in The Fault in Our Stars. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
Coming of Age Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Being Different Theme Icon
...marathon, Hazel attempts to get out of going to group. She argues with her mom. Mrs. Lancaster explains that she wants Hazel to make friends and be a normal teenager. Eventually, she... (full context)
Chapter 3
Coming of Age Theme Icon
Life and Death Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Being Different Theme Icon
...late reading the book Augustus had given her, which is particularly violent, but somehow enjoyable. Mrs. Lancaster says she knows that Hazel likes Augustus and she knew the support group would pay... (full context)
Chapter 5
Family Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy Theme Icon
...about the letter and invitation to Amsterdam, her mother says they don’t have the money. Mrs. Lancaster , knowing how important it is to her, offers to talk to her father about... (full context)
Coming of Age Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...Augustus and Mr. Lancaster begin talking about basketball and Hazel goes inside with her mother. Mrs. Lancaster asks Hazel if she wants to put the flowers in a vase, but Hazel wants... (full context)
Chapter 6
Coming of Age Theme Icon
Life and Death Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Being Different Theme Icon
...too concerned with her health to engage with them. Hazel is short with them, and Mrs. Lancaster says she is acting very “teenagery”. Hazel responds by saying that is what her mother... (full context)
Chapter 7
Life and Death Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...and notes that someone’s kid had died. She calls the nurse who lets Mr. Lancasterand Mrs. Lancaster in. They hug and kiss her, assuring her that she does not have a brain... (full context)
Being Different Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy Theme Icon
The nurse asks Mr. and Mrs. Lancaster to leave because they pose an infection risk. She feeds Hazel crushed ice and tells... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy Theme Icon
...an existentialist experiment in delayed gratification. When Dr. Maria tells Hazel she can go home, Mrs. Lancaster pulls out a pair of clothes from her purse for Hazel to wear on the... (full context)
Life and Death Theme Icon
Being Different Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy Theme Icon
...decision to minimize the pain she inflicts upon others. After reading the letter, Hazel asks Mrs. Lancaster to check with Dr. Maria about whether she will still be able to travel to... (full context)
Chapter 8
Life and Death Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...and her mother was telling her it was alright to let go. She remembers hearing Mrs. Lancaster sobbing into Mr. Lancaster’s chest, saying, “I won’t be a mom anymore.” (full context)
Coming of Age Theme Icon
...Hazel is shocked, but Augustus ensures her that it is just friendly. He then kisses Mrs. Lancaster on the cheek, and says, see it’s just friendly. (full context)
Life and Death Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Being Different Theme Icon
...their trip to Amsterdam was all set up. Hazel calls her mother into the room. Mrs. Lancaster appears wearing a towel, and says that she was just trying to take a bath... (full context)
Chapter 10
Coming of Age Theme Icon
Life and Death Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy Theme Icon
Mrs. Lancaster wakes Hazel up five thirty, even though the plane does not leave until noon. She... (full context)
Life and Death Theme Icon
...Before they can knock, they hear someone crying inside. Hazel realizes it is Augustus, and Mrs. Lancaster immediately turns her back toward the car. Hazel texts Augustus, who texts back that he... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
At the gate, Augustus notes that Mrs. Lancaster is a particularly punctual person. She tells Augustus that she isn’t very busy, so that... (full context)
Being Different Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy Theme Icon
Augustus takes the window seat, while hazel sits in the middle with Mrs. Lancaster in the isle. Augustus says that eggs are in some way sacred because they have... (full context)
Coming of Age Theme Icon
Life and Death Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy Theme Icon
Hazel and Augustus stay awake while Mrs. Lancaster falls asleep. They admire the beauty of the sky as the sun sets. Augustus quotes... (full context)
Chapter 11
Coming of Age Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...from the hotel. She falls asleep, and wakes up a few hours later. She finds Mrs. Lancaster sitting in a chair across from the bed. Hazel asks her mother how the park... (full context)
Coming of Age Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...but can’t get the words out of her mouth. Finally she says she feels underdressed. Mrs. Lancaster then tells Augustus he looks extremely handsome. (full context)
Chapter 12
Coming of Age Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy Theme Icon
...not a pipe), which is referenced multiple times in An Imperial affliction. The shirt confuses Mrs. Lancaster . Hazel explains that all representations of a thing are inherently abstract. (full context)
Chapter 13
Religion and Philosophy Theme Icon
The following day, Hazel, Mrs. Lancaster , and Augustus go to a café where Hazel and Augustus reenact their incident with... (full context)
Coming of Age Theme Icon
Life and Death Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy Theme Icon
Mrs. Lancaster then leaves abruptly, saying that she is going to give them some time to talk.... (full context)
Chapter 15
Coming of Age Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...experience they had in Amsterdam. As the conversation goes around the table, Mr. Lancaster and Mrs. Lancaster finish each other’s sentences, and Hazel and Augustus find themselves doing the same thing. (full context)
Chapter 20
Coming of Age Theme Icon
Life and Death Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Being Different Theme Icon
...a hold of her wrist, which makes her feel like a two-year-old. She argues that Mrs. Lancaster was the one who didn't want her to be a homebody. She tells her mother... (full context)
Chapter 22
Life and Death Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...she says it feels like stabbing and being stabbed. When Augustus’ parents begin talking to Mrs. Lancaster and Mr. Lancaster, Hazel decides to go to Augustus’ coffin. (full context)
Life and Death Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...Augustus parents in pain, or her own parents knowing that they will bury her someday. Mrs. Lancaster , however, insists they go. (full context)
Chapter 24
Coming of Age Theme Icon
Life and Death Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy Theme Icon
When Hazel gets home from the support group she argues with her mother about eating. Mrs. Lancaster says she can’t just stop eating because Augustus died. She tries to walk away, but... (full context)
Chapter 25
Life and Death Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Being Different Theme Icon
While Hazel is pondering these ideas, Mrs. Lancaster comes into the room and tells her that it’s Bastille Day. She pulls two French... (full context)
Coming of Age Theme Icon
Life and Death Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy Theme Icon
The day is beautiful, and Hazel and Mrs. Lancaster meet Mr. Lancaster at the park. They sit beside “the ruins”, a rectangular model of... (full context)