The Maze Runner

Pdf fan dd71f526917d6085d66d045bd94fb5b55d02a108dd45d836cbdd4abe2d4c043d Tap here to download this LitChart! (PDF)

Newt Character Analysis

Alby’s second-in-command, Newt is kinder, smarter, and more level-headed than Alby. While fear of punishment is Alby’s preferred method for maintaining order, Newt believes work and labor are the best ways to preserve order in their society. Newt is one of the first of the Gladers to befriend Thomas. He also takes over Alby’s role as leader after Alby goes through the Changing.

Newt Quotes in The Maze Runner

The The Maze Runner quotes below are all either spoken by Newt or refer to Newt. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Memory and Identity  Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Delacorte Press edition of The Maze Runner published in 2009.
Chapter 6 Quotes

“Out there’s the Maze,” Newt whispered, eyes wide as if in a trance. “Everything we do—our whole life, Greenie—revolves around the Maze. Every lovin’ second of every lovin’ day we spend in honor of the Maze, tryin’ to solve somethin’ that’s not shown us it has a bloody solution, ya know? And we want to show ya why it’s not to be messed with. Show ya why them buggin’ walls close shut every night. Show ya why you should never, never find your butt out there.”

Related Characters: Newt (speaker), Thomas
Related Symbols: The Maze
Page Number: 38
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, we learn more about the Maze, the most important symbol in the novel. Thomas is gradually adjusting to his new life: a fellow youth, Newt, explains to him that the Maze is at the center of their lives. The maze is a sinister structure, as Newt is about to show Thomas: it contains the Grievers, dangerous, nocturnal beings that can attack Thomas and his peers.

It's been suggested that the Maze and the Grievers are symbols of the world of adolescence and young adulthood (they're at their most dangerous during the nighttime, not unlike certain teenagers, and they involve a passage beyond the idyllic, simpler world of the Glade). Taken as a symbol of the future, the Maze stands as an intimidating yet inevitable part of Thomas's life: just as he must inevitably grow up, he must inevitably face the mysteries of the Maze.

A+

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other The Maze Runner quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!
Chapter 8 Quotes

Newt looked down in the Box one more time, then faced the crowd, gravely. “It’s a girl,” he said. Everyone started talking at once; Thomas only caught pieces here and there. “A girl?” “I got dibs!” “What’s she look like?” “How old is she?”

Related Characters: Newt (speaker), Thomas, Teresa
Page Number: 54
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, we're introduced to Teresa, a girl who's been sent up into the world of the maze. The boys in Thomas's community are excited by the prospects of having a girl in their group--they've only ever been sent boys as new members. Notice that Newt cries out, "It's a girl," the phrase usually associated with a birth. Newt's outburst emphasizes that emerging from the elevator and into the Glade is itself a kind of birth--a rebirth, allowing the characters to discover their own personalities or possibly create new ones. (Especially since none of them have memories of their past lives.) Notice also that the boys clearly have sexual needs, and seem to think of Teresa is strictly sexual terms. The overall "vibe" of Thomas's community is that of a middle school or high school, full of immature teenagers.

Chapter 15 Quotes

“Order,” Newt continued. “Order. You say that bloody word over and over in your shuck head. Reason we’re all sane around here is ’cause we work our butts off and maintain order. Order’s the reason we put Ben out—can’t very well have loonies runnin’ around tryin’ to kill people, now can we? Order. Last thing we need is you screwin’ that up.”

Related Characters: Newt (speaker), Thomas, Ben
Page Number: 102
Explanation and Analysis:

The Gladers operate on a system of strict order--everyone has to do their part or risk banishment, which is the same as death. Newt is irritated when Thomas--still new to the way things work--complains that he finds his duties menial and boring, and he wants to become a Maze Runner. Newt sees this kind of ambition and individualism as dangerous, so he warns Thomas to devote himself to "order." For Newt, living in the Glade means working hard and accepting one's place.

One reason that Newt isn't sympathetic to Thomas is that he's been among the Gladers for longer than Thomas. When Thomas points out that it may not have been right to banishment Ben, Newt dismisses Thomas's concerns. The Gladers don't really believe in independence or mercy--they believe in work and order, and nothing else.

Chapter 23 Quotes

“Are they changed because they want to go back to their old life, or is it because they’re so depressed at realizing their old life was no better than what we have now?”

Related Characters: Thomas (speaker), Alby, Newt
Related Symbols: The Changing
Page Number: 149
Explanation and Analysis:

Here Thomas sits with Newt and discusses the Changing, the mysterious mental transformation that Alby is now undergoing as he recovers from the Grievers' venom. Newt explains that the Changing can be intensely painful for some people--during the Changing, Gladers see flashes of their old lives, and then have to return to their present-day existences outside in the Glade. Newt takes the position that the Changing is depressing because Gladers get to remember the past, but then have to go back to their current lives, which are harder and sadder than their past lives. Thomas, however, suggests that the Changing is so traumatic because it illustrates that the Gladers never had a happy life--their pasts are no better than their presents.

The passage corresponds to two views about human development. If the Changing symbolizes puberty and maturity, then Newt is arguing that people are innately good and innocent--and they lose their innocence during puberty. Thomas, however, suggests that there is innate goodness, or an innate lack of goodness--childhood is no happier or better than adulthood.

Chapter 26 Quotes

“I didn’t do anything wrong. All I know is I saw two people struggling to get inside these walls and they couldn’t make it. To ignore that because of some stupid rule seemed selfish, cowardly, and...well, stupid. If you want to throw me in jail for trying to save someone’s life, then go ahead. Next time I promise I’ll point at them and laugh, then go eat some of Frypan’s dinner.”

Related Characters: Thomas (speaker), Alby, Newt, Frypan
Related Symbols: The Maze
Page Number: 166
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Thomas negotiates with his fellow Gladers. Thomas has saved the lives of Minho and Alby while they were in the Maze--but in the process, he's broken the rules, venturing into the Maze. A trial is held for Thomas, to determine whether he should be punished for breaking the rules or praised for helping his peers.

The trial illustrates the basic tension between the Gladers: those who believe in rules and order, and those who believe in right and wrong. Thomas defends himself by saying that protecting Alby and Minho was the "right" thing to do--he doesn't deny that he broke the rules, but he questions whether such rules are really worth following in such a situation. Notice that Thomas also says that saving Alby and Minho was the practical thing to do--had he followed the rules, his peers would have died, leaving the entire community weaker.

Chapter 30 Quotes

Newt’s head appeared at the little glassless window, looking through the bars, a smirk on his face. “Nice reward for breakin’ the rules. You saved some lives, Tommy, but ya still need to learn—”

“Yeah, I know. Order.”

Related Characters: Thomas (speaker), Newt (speaker), Alby, Minho
Page Number: 191
Explanation and Analysis:

Thomas has been sent to the Glade jail, the Slammer, for disobeying the rules of the community. In the Slammer, Newt lectures Thomas about the importance of obedience to authority. But by this point in the novel, Thomas has already heard Newt's little speech several times--it's getting boring, and Thomas doesn't take it even halfway seriously.

Thomas is beginning to develop his own moral code, distinct from that of the Glade. While others, such as Newt, emphasize obedience to authority, Thomas makes his own rules, and acts for moral reasons--even going out of his way to save Alby and Minho from the Maze. Thomas's self-reliance makes him the most sympathetic and admirable character in the book. Rules and laws are useless when they go against fundamental morality, and so Thomas's disobedience looks like heroism.

Chapter 36 Quotes

“Congrats, Jeff,” Newt said. “You’re officially the first guy here to get your butt beat by a girl.”

Teresa didn’t stop. “Keep talking like that and you’ll be next.”

Related Characters: Teresa (speaker), Newt (speaker), Jeff
Page Number: 238
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Teresa proves that she's tougher and stronger than many of the boys in her community. She's snuck to the graveyard, where she meets Newt. Teresa explains that she was able to sneak to the graveyard by attacking Jeff, another Glader. Newt laughs about how Jeff must be weak, but falls silent when Teresa threatens to attack him, too. The message is clear: even if the overall "vibe" of the Glade is masculine, competitive, and immature, women like Teresa are strong and confident enough to stand up for themselves and fight any boys who give them trouble. The novel certainly doesn't delve into many complications of sexism or gender roles, but merely sticks with its assertion that women are as strong and resourceful as men.

Chapter 48 Quotes

Thomas shook his head. “No, you don’t get it. They’re weeding us out, seeing if we’ll give up, finding the best of us. Throwing variables at us, trying to make us quit. Testing our ability to hope and fight. Sending Teresa here and shutting everything down was only the last part, one more...final analysis. Now it’s time for the last test. To escape.”

Related Characters: Thomas (speaker), Teresa, Newt
Page Number: 301
Explanation and Analysis:

Thomas is now clearly beginning to figure out what the Maze is designed to achieve. He doesn't have all the information, but he's guessed that the Maze is specifically designed to challenge the Gladers, separating the strong from the weak.

Throughout the passage, Thomas's tone remains optimistic--he wants to escape from the Maze at all costs. While others, such as Alby, seemed to think that it was better to remain a Glader, ignorant of the past, Thomas is confident that he and his friends' lives will be better once they escape. It's important to note that, as Thomas becomes more aware of his surroundings, he's also become more mature and confident in his own abilities--by exploring his environment, he's grown up.

Chapter 51 Quotes

“I’m telling you.” Alby sounded like he was begging—near hysterical. “We can’t go back to where we came from. I’ve seen it, remembered awful, awful things. Burned land, a disease—something called the Flare. It was horrible—way worse than we have it here…Better to die than go home.”

Related Characters: Alby (speaker), Thomas, Newt
Page Number: 312
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, it's revealed that Alby doesn't want Thomas and his friends to go back to the outside world--he wants everyone to remain in the Glade, where life is dangerous and strict, but at least ordered and familiar. Alby has been sabotaging any plans that could potentially lead to an escape--he's absolutely desperate to remain in his current home. Alby explains that he's seen visions of the outside world, in which existence looks cruel and frightening.

In spite of--or perhaps, because of--the fact that he's a leader among the Gladers, Alby is too afraid to leave the Glade forever. For all his pretensions of maturity and control, he's a child--too frightened of the outside world to explore it on his own, and longing to remain in his state of "ignorant bliss."

Chapter 54 Quotes

“After two years of being treated like mice, tonight we’re making a stand. Tonight we’re taking the fight back to the Creators, no matter what we have to go through to get there. Tonight the Grievers better be scared.”

Related Characters: Newt (speaker)
Page Number: 328
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Newt sums up everything the Gladers are going to achieve. For too long, Newt and his friends have been forced to run through the Maze like mice--now, they're going to track down the people who designed the Maze and kidnapped them in the first place.

Notice that it's Newt, not Alby, the group's supposed leader, who's speaking to his friends here. Newt, in spite of his dogmatic reliance on the rules, is brave and optimistic enough to inspire his friends--unlike Alby, his commander, he's not really afraid of the outside world. Newt inspires his peers to stand up for themselves and explore the unknown--in short, to grow up.

Chapter 55 Quotes

Minho continued. “Alby didn’t wanna go back to his old life. He freaking sacrificed himself for us—and they aren’t attacking, so maybe it worked. We’d be heartless if we wasted it.”

Related Characters: Minho (speaker), Thomas, Alby, Newt
Page Number: 334
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Alby, the leader of the Gladers, has just sacrificed himself to the deadly Grievers in order to protect his friends from danger. Alby has been frightened of leaving the Glade for some time now--yet here, he not only participates in the movement to explore the outside world; he even gives up his own life for the sake of the mission.

Alby's sacrifice, it could be argued, reinforces how opposed he was to leaving the Glade. He's exceptionally brave, and yet he's also deeply frightened of going back to his old life--a life that he's previously described as terrifying and horrible. Alby's act is a kind of noble suicide, designed to free himself from the pain of returning to the past, but also to help those who are determined to do so.

Get the entire The Maze Runner LitChart as a printable PDF.
The maze runner.pdf.medium

Newt Character Timeline in The Maze Runner

The timeline below shows where the character Newt appears in The Maze Runner. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 2
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
...is the first “greenbean” to arrive since a boy named Nick was killed. Another boy, Newt, interrupts Alby, saying that he’s going to scare Thomas even more if he starts by... (full context)
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
Growing Up Theme Icon
Suddenly an ear-piercing scream comes from one of the nearby buildings. Newt goes off to help and tells Thomas to find Chuck in order to find out... (full context)
Chapter 3
Memory and Identity  Theme Icon
Growing Up Theme Icon
Annoyed that Chuck cannot give him any information, Thomas goes looking for answers from Newt. Thomas follows the sound of the screams to a large wood-framed building. Inside several boys... (full context)
Memory and Identity  Theme Icon
Growing Up Theme Icon
At the top of the stairs, Thomas opens a door and sees Alby and Newt sitting by Ben who is writhing in pain on a bed. Large green veins crisscross... (full context)
Chapter 6
Memory and Identity  Theme Icon
The next morning, Newt wakes Thomas up before dawn. Newt says he’s supposed to show Thomas something before everyone... (full context)
Chapter 8
Growing Up Theme Icon
Sexism Theme Icon
When the elevator arrives and the doors open, Newt looks inside and announces, “It’s a girl.” All the boys start to hoot and call... (full context)
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
Hope Theme Icon
Thomas is about to go with them when Newt and Alby ask him to stay and look at the girl to see if she... (full context)
Chapter 9
Memory and Identity  Theme Icon
Growing Up Theme Icon
Sexism Theme Icon
Newt calls for the Med-Jacks, the Glade’s version of doctors, to examine the girl. They determine... (full context)
Chapter 13
Memory and Identity  Theme Icon
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
...the East Door. A couple of Gladers drag a crying Ben to the Door and Newt brings out a giant pole with a collar at one end. Seeing the punishment begin... (full context)
Chapter 15
Memory and Identity  Theme Icon
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
Sacrifice  Theme Icon
...to sleep with the images of Ben’s haunted face on his mind. The next morning, Newt wakes Thomas up and tells him he’ll be spending the day working with the farmers.... (full context)
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
Newt tells Thomas that he was a Runner until a few months ago, when he hurt... (full context)
Chapter 16
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
At lunch, Newt is distraught and tells Thomas that the girl is still in coma. Newt says that... (full context)
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
Hope Theme Icon
...Alby and Minho. Afraid that they’re dead, the Gladers eat dinner solemnly. As they eat, Newt runs frantically from Door to Door, hoping that Alby and Minho will return before the... (full context)
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
Sacrifice  Theme Icon
Growing Up Theme Icon
Hope Theme Icon
...inside the Maze with Alby, stung by a Griever, being helped along. Thomas calls for Newt’s help, but realizes Newt won’t be able to get to the Door in time to... (full context)
Chapter 22
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
Hope Theme Icon
...Minho and Thomas arrive at the spot, the Door is already open and they see Newt. Too exhausted to help get Alby down, Thomas shows Newt where Alby is hanging and... (full context)
Chapter 23
Growing Up Theme Icon
Chuck and Newt find Thomas in the graveyard. Newt tells him that Alby be will alright soon. When... (full context)
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
Sacrifice  Theme Icon
Before Newt leaves, he says that all the Keepers will meet tomorrow to discuss if they should... (full context)
Chapter 24
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
...there as Keeper of the Runners. There is one chair empty for the absent Alby. Newt leads the meeting, saying that half the Gladers think Thomas is a rule-breaker and the... (full context)
Chapter 25
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
The Keepers argue loudly about Minho’s suggestion until Newt calms everyone and asks Minho to better explain his proposal. Minho says that out of... (full context)
Chapter 26
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
Newt proposes that they throw Thomas in the Slammer for one day and then let him... (full context)
Chapter 27
Growing Up Theme Icon
...starts to say something else, but then begins to viciously choke himself. Thomas calls for Newt and together they try to restrain Alby. Alby comes close to killing himself, but he... (full context)
Chapter 28
Memory and Identity  Theme Icon
Newt and Thomas get leftovers from lunch and discuss the situation regarding Alby. Newt says that... (full context)
Memory and Identity  Theme Icon
Growing Up Theme Icon
Newt tells Thomas that they need to find out who he was before coming to the... (full context)
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
...and then hears a girl’s voice say the name “Teresa” in his head. After telling Newt what he heard, Newt says that Thomas must have unlocked her name from his memory. (full context)
Chapter 30
Memory and Identity  Theme Icon
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
In a concrete building north of the Homestead, Newt lets Thomas into the jail cell. There is only one rickety wooden chair and nothing... (full context)
Chapter 35
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
After failing to find anything else, they return to the Glade to tell Newt and Alby about the portal, which Thomas christens the Griever Hole. But first Minho takes... (full context)
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
After drawing the map, Minho and Thomas run into Newt and Alby outside the Map Room. Newt informs them that supplies have stopped coming through... (full context)
Chapter 36
Sexism Theme Icon
Newt, Alby, and a Med-Jack named Jeff come into the graveyard. Newt asks how Teresa got... (full context)
Chapter 37
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
...everyone is working hard so that they can keep from panicking. Thomas goes to see Newt and convinces him that Teresa is innocent. Newt says that if they can survive the... (full context)
Chapter 38
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
Inside the Homestead, Minho, Newt, Alby, and Thomas discuss what they need to do to defend themselves and escape the... (full context)
Chapter 39
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
Sacrifice  Theme Icon
...of the planks, a Griever comes through the window. At first the Griever goes for Newt, but then Gally sacrifices himself by charging into it. The Griever takes hold of Gally... (full context)
Chapter 40
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
Hope Theme Icon
Thomas runs to the Door that Minho went through but Newt calls out to him before he goes inside. As Newt tells him not to go... (full context)
Chapter 41
Hope Theme Icon
...triggering the end. Desperate and in need of whatever help they can get, Minho and Newt agree to let her out. Once she’s out, Thomas says that she remembers that the... (full context)
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
Minho glances knowingly at Newt. Minho tells them that before the fire, they moved the maps from the Map Room... (full context)
Chapter 42
Memory and Identity  Theme Icon
Growing Up Theme Icon
When Newt and Minho come back with the materials, Thomas orders everyone to trace the last ten... (full context)
Chapter 43
Memory and Identity  Theme Icon
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
Thomas, Newt, Minho, and Teresa trace more days and stack them together in the way Thomas showed... (full context)
Chapter 45
Hope Theme Icon
When they return, it’s early morning and Newt says that the Grievers took a boy named Adam who Thomas never met. Minho is... (full context)
Chapter 46
Sacrifice  Theme Icon
Growing Up Theme Icon
Hope Theme Icon
...take a boy named Dave. As they run off, Thomas follows them despite Teresa and Newt’s protestation. When Thomas attacks the Griever holding Dave, the rest of the pack start stinging... (full context)
Growing Up Theme Icon
Hope Theme Icon
Chuck, Teresa and Newt find Thomas lying in the grass, barely consciousness. They carry him back into the house... (full context)
Chapter 48
Memory and Identity  Theme Icon
Growing Up Theme Icon
Hope Theme Icon
...along with two other boys were taken by the Grievers. Thomas tells Chuck to get Newt so that they can call a Gathering. Then he contacts Teresa in his head and... (full context)
Memory and Identity  Theme Icon
Hope Theme Icon
When Newt arrives, Thomas tells him that the Maze is actually a test designed to see if... (full context)
Chapter 49
Growing Up Theme Icon
...were children and named them after scientists (Thomas for Thomas Edison, Alby for Albert Einstein, Newt for Sir Isaac Newton, etc.). (full context)
Chapter 50
Memory and Identity  Theme Icon
Newt tells the group that the Creators are their enemy, not Thomas and Teresa. Minho agrees... (full context)
Chapter 51
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
Growing Up Theme Icon
...Alby responds that maybe Thomas was just trying to get the Gladers to trust him. Newt cuts in, saying that Thomas risked his life getting sung by the Grievers just so... (full context)
Chapter 52
Sacrifice  Theme Icon
While the Keepers erupt into loud argument, Newt has a chance to talk one-on-one with Thomas. Newt tells him to leave the meeting... (full context)
Sacrifice  Theme Icon
Hope Theme Icon
Thomas tells Newt that he wants to sacrifice himself because it’s the only way to redeem himself for... (full context)
Chapter 53
Hope Theme Icon
After the Gathering ends, Newt meets up with Thomas and Teresa at the Box. Newt tells them that all the... (full context)
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
Hope Theme Icon
Newt agrees that they need to arm the Gladers but says that he and not Thomas... (full context)
Sacrifice  Theme Icon
Hope Theme Icon
Newt gathers the boys and, to Thomas’ surprise, most of the Gladers decide to go. Thomas... (full context)
Chapter 54
Sacrifice  Theme Icon
Hope Theme Icon
As everyone finishes dinner, Newt and Alby announce that it’s time to enter the Maze. Thomas notices Alby vacantly staring... (full context)
Chapter 55
Sacrifice  Theme Icon
Hope Theme Icon
...the Grievers guarding the Hole. They swarm over him and tear his body apart. When Newt tries to save him, Thomas tells him there is nothing he can do for Alby... (full context)
Sacrifice  Theme Icon
Hope Theme Icon
Realizing that Minho is right, Newt tells the Gladers that their main priority is to protect Thomas and Teresa so that... (full context)
Chapter 58
Sacrifice  Theme Icon
...Teresa cheer Chuck for finding the button. Minho then jumps into the Hole, followed by Newt, and some of the other Keepers and Gladers. Minho says that eighteen of them survived... (full context)
Chapter 59
Sacrifice  Theme Icon
Growing Up Theme Icon
...He rushes at Gally and beats him to the sound of Gally’s crunching bones until Newt and Minho pull him off. Thomas goes back to Chuck’s lifeless body and weeps long... (full context)
Chapter 62
Stability and Order vs. Change and Chaos  Theme Icon
Hope Theme Icon
...on the bottom bed of a bunk bed. Minho is on the top bed and Newt has the bed next to theirs. Minho asks what he thinks happened to the Gladers... (full context)