The Adventure of the Speckled Band

by

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

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The Adventure of the Speckled Band Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
“The Adventure of the Speckled Band” begins with Watson, the story’s narrator, noting that, of the nearly seventy cases that he and Sherlock Holmes have embarked on together as a detective duo, the one that he is about to narrate is among the most unusual. Watson also notes that Holmes only takes cases that are out of the ordinary, as he is a detective “for the love of his art” not as a means to get rich.
From the opening lines of the story, the reader notices that Holmes seems to think of detective work as a higher calling—a life passion more than a mere job. He revels in these strange and supposedly unsolvable cases, which paints him as something of an eccentric, and also points to his honor, since he doesn’t care about money.
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Watson says that he would have told these events sooner, but he was sworn to secrecy by a lady, whose untimely death has allowed him to tell the tale. As the cause of Dr. Grimesby Roylott’s death has long been gossiped about, Watson seeks to set the record straight in his narrative.
By telling the reader that he was long sworn to secrecy, Watson is making the case that the strange circumstances of this crime would have brought shame to their client’s family. As manners and decorum were integral to the Victorian ethos of the era, keeping public gossip to a minimum was important to Watson and Holmes.
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The events that Watson recounts start early one morning in April of 1883, when he and Holmes were living as roommates in an apartment on Baker Street in London. Watson wakes up to find Holmes, normally a late riser, standing over him to let him know that they have a distressed young lady waiting for them in their sitting room.
The fact that Holmes and Watson live together as roommates gives readers a sense of their deep working relationship, in which Watson is able to closely understand Holmes’s unique skill set as a solver of crimes and narrate their developments for the reader.
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Holmes notes that young women would only be wandering the streets of London at such an hour if there were a pressing need, so her case must be important. As Watson loves nothing more than watching Holmes use his exceptional deductive skills, he is excited to embark on a new adventure.
By having a client arrive early in the morning, when the two are normally sleeping, readers are led to believe that her case must be extremely urgent. Though Holmes partly embarks on his cases for the pure love of solving the logical puzzles of a given crime, he also seeks to help victims. Reducing the general evil he sees in the world is one of his prime moral objectives as a detective.
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A few moments later, they head down to the sitting-room, where a young woman, clad in black and wearing a veil, is sitting near the window. Holmes notes that the woman is shivering, and he says she should sit next to the fire and drink a cup of hot coffee. The woman says that a sense of terror, not cold, is causing her to shiver. She lifts her veil to reveal a pale face and a frightened look in her eyes. The woman looks to be around thirty and has prematurely grey hair.
The physical descriptions of Holmes and Watson’s future client help the reader see how heavily the case has been weighing on her conscience. By stating that her hair is prematurely grey, it illustrates in physical form that she has witnessed something shockingly horrible and is desperate to escape her particular situation.
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Holmes makes the quick observation that she must have started her travels early that morning (he notices half of a train ticket in her hand and sees splatters of mud, indicating that she traveled partially by dog-cart), and the woman introduces herself as Helen Stoner.
Sherlock Holmes is renowned for his uncanny observational skills. He is able to notice minute details that others might be unable to see, like mud splatters and a torn train ticket, which is part of the reason that he so successful in his pursuit of solving crimes.
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Helen tells Holmes that he was recommended by an acquaintance who had used the detective’s services for an earlier case. Helen also says that she is unable to afford a payment at the moment, but will be married in a month and can pay Holmes then. The detective says that his “profession is its own reward,” and money isn’t an issue for him.
Just as Watson tells the reader earlier that Holmes is a detective who does it “for the love of his art,” this sentiment is echoed again here. The process of solving crimes and the pleasure he obtains from using his sharp deductive skills is the real reason he does his work, not to merely collect a paycheck.
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Helen then recounts the incidents that led her to seek Holmes’s help. She lives with her stepfather, Dr. Grimesby Roylott, the sole remaining descendent of the Roylotts of Stoke Moran, one of the oldest Saxon families in England. The Roylotts were once among the richest families in the country, but their fortunes have slowly been reduced to nearly nothing after generations of wasteful habits.
By telling Holmes and Watson right away that Dr. Roylott belongs to a once-noble family, Helen is conveying to the detectives how far he has fallen since. Not only has the entire family lineage been reduced to a single man, but its former wealth has also shrunk to nearly nothing by the time Roylott becomes an adult.
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Realizing that he needed a career, a young Roylott earned a medical degree and moved to India to set up a medical practice. While there, he married Mrs. Stoner, the widow of a major in the Bengal Army with two twin daughters. Roylott, provoked by a robbery in his house, beat his butler to death and somehow managed to escape a capital sentence. With his new family, he returned to England in disgrace.
Unlike the earlier generations of his family, Roylott actually has to find a career that can generate an income. The theme of the exotic, which is threaded throughout this story, has its source in India, where Roylott practiced medicine, married Mrs. Stoner and got so angry at a butler that he murdered him. This is meant to flag for readers that Roylott has dalliances with the strange and bizarre (India, in Doyle’s orientalist portrayal), and that Roylott is dangerous and prone to rage.
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Not long after, Helen’s mother died in a train accident, leaving a sizable inheritance to Roylott, with a stipulation that should Helen or her twin sister Julia get married, they would receive an annual income from it.
The rule governing the inheritance that Mrs. Stoner leaves to both Roylott and to the twins will become a clue in the murder. By making marriage the way that Julia and Helen can escape the confines of Stoke Moran, it is immediately clear that Roylott would want to retain his portion of his ex-wife’s funds by any means necessary.
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Roylott attempted to start a medical practice in London but gave up after some time and moved back, along with Helen and Julia, to the decaying Stoke Moran Manor.
Stoke Moran, once a well-kept estate but now a crumbling mansion, symbolizes the Roylott family’s financial and moral decline.
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Rather than integrating into the surrounding rural community of Surrey, who were excited to have someone from the distinguished family living in the manor again, Roylott became reclusive and got furiously angry with anyone who crossed his path. This temper, Helen believes, was aggravated by living for years in India.
After returning to Surrey after his years abroad in India, Roylott begins his own descent into eccentricity and bitterness. Much of Roylott’s violent temperament can be traced to his time in India, where his deep anger was nurtured by forces that the Stoner twins, and the reader, never fully understand.
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Helen tells Holmes and Watson that Roylott has no friends aside from the group of wandering gypsies who have set up a camp on the Stoke Moran property. In exchange for letting them have tents on the manor’s grounds, they let Roylott stay with them for weeks at a time. She also says that her stepfather has a passion for Indian animals, keeping a cheetah and a baboon as pets that he allows to wander around the property.
Both the gypsies and the wild animals who wander around the overgrown property surrounding Stoke Moran are aspects of the exoticism within this story. They are depicted as vague threats, thus giving the place a strange sinister ambience that can be traced to forces that aren’t traditionally related to Anglo British culture.
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Two years ago, Helen tells Holmes and Watson, her sister got engaged. Roylott had no objection to the marriage, but Julia died under mysterious circumstances shortly before her set wedding date.
As the reader learned earlier about the importance of marriage for the Stoner twins (through marriage, they can access their inheritance and the independence that comes with it), a great weight is placed on the occurrence of Julia’s mysterious death shortly before her wedding date.
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Helen then tells the detectives about the incidents leading up to Julia’s strange death. She describes the layout of the building: Roylott, Julia, and Helen all lived in adjacent bedrooms in the only inhabited portion of the manor. “There is no communication between [the rooms],” Helen says, “but they all open into the same corridor.” In this arrangement, Julia and Roylott shared a wall.
The strange layout of Stoke Moran, where the three residents all live close together in a single wing of the decrepit mansion, demonstrates the sense of isolation that Roylott has impressed upon the sisters for many years.
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One night, disturbed by the smell of Roylott’s Indian cigar smoke in her room, Julia went to Helen’s room to chat about her approaching wedding. As she left, Julia asked if Helen had ever heard a low whistling sound in the middle of the night. Helen had not, and she wondered if it came from the gypsy camp.
The smell of Roylott’s cigar and the sound of a low whistle are the telling clues of Julia’s mysterious death. That neither of the sisters were able to connect these two elements as signs of suspicious activity in the Manor is one sign of their general isolation from their surroundings and a clue that Julia’s room might not be as cut off from the other bedrooms as she imagined.
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Helen and Julia always locked themselves in at night, and the sisters’ bedroom windows, which open to the lawn outside, were always shuttered to keep out the wandering animals.
Though Helen and Julia are free to come and go as they please, the fact that they’ve had to lock themselves in their rooms at night is yet another indication of how they are, in effect, imprisoned in their home.
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One night shortly before Julia’s wedding, Helen heard a scream coming from her sister’s bedroom. As she entered the corridor, Helen seemed to hear the low whistling sound and a clanging of metal. She ran over to see what happened and Julia, in a state of shock, fell to the ground and started shaking in her sister’s arm. During her final convulsions, Julia said, “It was the band! The speckled band!” and then died. Helen tells Holmes and Watson that she saw a charred match and a match box in her sister’s hand, indicating that she had looked around right before she collapsed.
The repeated phrase of “the speckled band” is yet another clue that throws Helen, and thus Holmes and Watson, off the track in quickly solving the case. Though Julia is trying to communicate to Helen what killed her, the three words are just opaque enough to be open to multiple interpretations.
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With no markings on her body, and the fact that the windows and door were locked up, Julia’s death is a mystery to Helen. She tells Holmes that she assumed the “speckled band” had something to do with the band of gypsies on the property, who sometimes wear spotted handkerchiefs over their heads.
As all entryways and exits to Julia’s room are firmly closed when she dies, her death belongs to a detective story trope known as a “locked room mystery,” a difficult one to solve. The assumption that the “speckled band” refers to the groups of gypsies, another exotic and vaguely-sinister presence at the manor, presents another kind of “lock” that must be opened to solve the case.
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By the time she comes to visit Holmes and Watson, Helen herself has become engaged. Soon after she made the announcement to Roylott, renovations began on the exterior wall next to her bedroom, so she was made to move into her sister’s former room.
As she herself is soon to be married, Helen is understandably on edge about the circumstances of Julia’s death preceding her own wedding. By moving into her sister’s former room, Helen knows that she is being led into a similar setup, but she cannot figure out the specific plan.
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Not long after switching rooms, Helen began to hear the same low whistling sound that Julia had described. Thoroughly disturbed, she decided to make the long trek to London to see how Holmes could help her.
Only by hearing the telltale sounds does Helen force herself to seek outside help in Holmes and Watson. This can be seen as her first step towards agency and away from her stepfather’s grip.
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Holmes notices that Helen has five bruised marks on her wrist, which she says came from Roylott. She brushes this off, suggesting that her stepfather is merely unaware of his strength, but Holmes stares pensively into the fire. Holmes and Watson make plans to meet Helen at the Stoke Moran Manor later that day so they can begin investigating the death.
The bruises on Helen’s wrist, which a less observant detective may not have noticed, indicate to Holmes that Roylott’s abuse was not limited to verbal tirades against the neighboring townspeople—it also included some physical violence against the Stoner twins. Always eager to fight against injustice, Holmes decides to take on the case,
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Not long after Helen leaves their apartment, a large man with a threatening demeanor enters the room. He announces himself as Dr. Roylott, Helen’s stepfather. He tells Holmes and Watson that he’s been tracing Helen’s movements, knows that she has just paid them a visit, and demands to know what she told them. When Holmes refuses to say anything, Roylott tells them not to meddle in his affairs. He then grabs a fire poker, bends it as show of his strength, and leaves the room. Holmes then remarks that he himself is stronger than he looks and he bends the poker back into shape.
Roylott’s size, demeanor, dress and full name all immediately paint him as a somewhat threatening presence. Though Holmes makes light of Roylott’s intimidation tactics, when the doctor takes the fire poker and bends it in front of the detectives, it is meant to be a final sign of his physical control over the situation. However, after Roylott leaves and Holmes straightens the poker, the reader is able to see that Roylott’s brute strength is no match for Holmes’ own intellectual crime solving skills.
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Before leaving, Holmes runs errands and makes some calculations about the state of the inheritance that Mrs. Stoner left to Roylott. Taking into account falling agricultural prices, the remaining funds were rather low and the marriage of either daughter would likely cripple Roylott’s finances.
The calculations that Holmes makes about the steep decline in the remaining inheritance point to his early understanding that Roylott was increasingly desperate about his own financial security and thus willing to do anything to prevent his own downfall.
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Holmes and Watson begin their journey from London to Surrey, first by train and then by dog-cart. They cross paths with Helen and tell her that Roylott had been following her, which causes her some alarm.
By taking the same long travel route that Helen took to reach Holmes and Watson, the reader is able to see how eager she must have been to seek outside help in order to make such a trek to London. This emphasizes the sense of threat.
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Holmes and Watson then begin to inspect the manor with Helen’s help. Watson notes how the building is in a state of great decline, yet the scaffolding for the repairs outside of Helen’s room seems inessential.
The makeshift scaffolding and the few chips in the wall indicate that Roylott’s supposedly-necessary repairs to the outside of Helen’s room were in fact a ploy to get her to stay in her sister’s former room.
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The detectives inspect the bedrooms from the outside and determine that the shutters are essentially impenetrable. Inside the manor, they go to Julia’s former room, where Holmes examines every surface and notices that the bed is bolted to the floor and that a ventilator hole goes from that room into Roylott’s bedroom next door.
After confirming that the room can’t be entered from the outside, Holmes begins his search for signs of how a murder could happen within a locked room. With his superior observational skills, he finds several unusual features that will later help solve the case.
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Holmes also remarks on the strangeness of the bell-pull, supposedly installed to call the housekeeper upstairs, though the sisters never used the bell-pull because they never had a need for a housekeeper’s help. Holmes tests it and determines that it’s a fake, merely hanging onto a hook in the ceiling. Both the bell-pull and the ventilator were recently installed, Helen tells them. They then go into Roylott’s room, where Holmes notices a safe with a saucer of milk sitting on top of it and a leash tied and looped like a whipcord.
More unusual to Holmes than the vent and the bolted bed, though, is the fake bell-pull hanging directly above Julia’s former bed. As it doesn’t serve its purpose of communicating with a housekeeper, Holmes immediately knows that it had an important role in Julia’s murder. The various strange clues in Roylott’s room are less immediately telling for Holmes. He knows they mean something, he just isn’t quite sure what yet.
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Back outside, the three hatch a plan for the evening. Holmes and Watson will take a room on the second floor of the inn across the lane from the manor. Helen will tell her stepfather that she will be confining herself to her room due a headache. Then, when she hears that Roylott has gone to bed, she will undo the shutters, put a lamp in the window indicating that all is quiet in the house, and retreat into her former room. Holmes and Watson then go back to the inn and wait.
The complex plan that Holmes and Watson create allows the detectives to be waiting in the bedroom for some unexpected, malicious event to occur. As the home is fairly disconnected from every part of the surrounding town except for the inn across the lane, they choose to use it as their communication point between the two buildings.
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At the inn, the detectives wait for night to fall. From their window, they see Roylott pull up to the manor and yell at the boy driving him, who is unable to open the heavy gates. Holmes and Watson discuss the clues they saw that day, as well as how to proceed when they enter the mansion later.
Roylott’s quick fit of anger at his young driver, which Holmes and Watson see from a distance, only confirms their growing suspicion that the doctor is hatching some kind of sinister plan in the mansion.
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At eleven, Holmes and Watson see from their room at the inn that Helen has lit the lamp in her room, their signal to enter the manor. They set out into the night and, when they nearly reach the rooms, they see the outline of the baboon scurrying in front of them. Once the animal passes by, they slip off their shoes, secretly enter Julia’s former bedroom and close the windows.
The journey that Holmes and Watson make from the inn to the manor emphasizes the strangeness of this dilapidated environment, especially after night falls. This bizarre ambience is emphasized by the silhouette of the wandering baboon that passes in front of their path.
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Holmes instructs Watson to sit silently in the dark and not fall asleep. With a cane in his hands, Holmes sits on one side of the bed and Watson, with his pistol on a table, sits nearby. Through the window, they hear the whine of the cheetah outside.
As with the baboon they spotted on their way over to the manor, the sound of the whining cheetah outside the window gives a sense of danger.
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After waiting for hours, the detectives suddenly see a light coming from the ventilator and they smell oil, telling them that Roylott is stirring about next door. Holmes and Watson continue to sit in silence until they hear a hiss come into their room. Suddenly, Holmes gets up and begins to furiously beat at the bell-pull.
As Watson and Holmes are waiting in the dark and in silence, they are disconnected from each other's thought processes. Though Watson is unsure of what to expect, once Holmes hears a hissing sound enter the room, it is clear that he was prepared for what would happen.
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Right when Watson lights a lantern in the room, he hears the low whistling sound. The glare of the light makes it so he can’t see what Holmes had been beating at with his cane, but the detective’s face has paled and a taken on a look of terror. Moments later they hear a long and horribly loud scream come from Roylott’s room.
In the new glare of the lantern, Watson is further disoriented about what was happening as Holmes was beating the bell-pull with his cane. All he can make out is the distressed look on Holmes’s face and, shortly after, the terrible screams from the room next door. Clearly, Holmes is in the driver’s seat of the detective work and Watson is truly just an assistant.
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Once the screams fade down, they investigate Roylott’s room and see the doctor sitting on a chair wearing a long dressing gown and slippers with the looped leash in his lap and a snake curled tightly around his head. Holmes immediately remarks on the speckled bands around the snake’s skin and identifies it as a swamp adder, “the deadliest snake in India.” He notes that Roylott had likely died instantly from the snake’s bite. Holmes takes the leash from Roylott’s lap and places the snake back into the safe.
As expected by the horrible sounds, Roylott has died in his room. The “speckled band” is then understood to refer to the swamp adder snake which lethally bit Roylott and is coiled upon his head when Holmes and Watson enter the room, thus clearing up any lingering misunderstanding over the words on the reader’s part.
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Thus ends the investigation. Watson quickly summarizes for the reader how they conveyed the news to Helen, who then moves in with her aunt. A slow official inquiry gets underway. The story closes with Holmes telling Watson what he took away from the investigation, namely how important it is to have sufficient data. Julia mentioning the “speckled band” to Helen made her confuse the word “band” meaning “stripe” with “band” meaning “group,” thus putting Holmes onto the wrong scent and thinking the groups of gypsies had something to do with Julia’s death. Only by examining the physical clues directly in front of him—the bell-pull, the bolted bed and the ventilator hole—could he deduce the method of the crime.
As a way to unpack the events of the story, and to walk the reader through Holmes’ series of deductive leaps to solve the case, he tells Watson how the easy misunderstanding of the word “band” initially led him astray. Holmes’s overall lesson in the end is that hard facts are necessary to efficiently solve a crime and that depending on words alone can hinder as much as help.
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At the conclusion of the story, Holmes tells Watson that he knows he is at least partly responsible for Roylott’s death, but that the guilt of this evil man dying will not weigh on him very heavily.
Holmes has a serious moral compass. Even though his beating the snake likely angered it enough to kill Roylott, he is satisfied knowing that this death reduces the amount of potential evil flowing through the world.
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