And Then There Were None

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Mr. Rogers's wife, Ethel cooks all the meals on the island and does the housekeeping. Vera notices from the very beginning that Ethel looks constantly frightened and this seems to relate to her sense of guilt. Ms. Rogers dies in her sleep from poison during the first night on the island.

Ethel Rogers Quotes in And Then There Were None

The And Then There Were None quotes below are all either spoken by Ethel Rogers or refer to Ethel Rogers. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Justice Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Harper edition of And Then There Were None published in 2011.
Chapter 7 Quotes

“I mean – it explains Soldier Island. There are crimes that cannot be brought home to their perpetrators. Instance the Rogerses'. Another instance, old Wargrave, who committed his murder strictly within the law.”

Related Characters: Philip Lombard (speaker), Justice Wargrave, Thomas Rogers, Ethel Rogers
Related Symbols: The Island
Page Number: 114
Explanation and Analysis:

With Dr. Armstrong, Lombard reviews the information on the visitors to the island. He concludes that everyone who was invited is guilty of some form of murder.

Lombard articulates, here, the unifying concept for the island and for Christie’s text. He is thus the first character to be an effective detective, providing a model for the reader to follow as we take on a similar investigating role. Like any good reader, Lombard first reviews the information available to him and then makes a final pronouncement—“it explains”—that can connect all the threads of information.

The common feature for those who have been invited to the island deserves some consideration: The guests are not just murderers but rather ones whose crimes resist traditional methods of prosecution. They cannot be tried in normal courtrooms and thus the island becomes itself a pseudo-courtroom—a place where culpability is punished in a way that normal social regulations do not permit. Christie thus complicates the ethics of the ensuing murders, casting them as cruel but also as providing a form of vigilante justice that could not be dealt out elsewhere in society.

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Chapter 15 Quotes

“But don't you see, he's mad? It's all mad! The whole thing of going by the rhyme is mad! Dressing up the judge, killing Rogers when he was chopping sticks – drugging Mrs. Roberts so that she overslept herself – arranging for a bumble bee when Miss Brent died! It's like some horrible child playing a game. It's all got to fit in.”

Related Characters: Vera Claythorne (speaker), Justice Wargrave, Thomas Rogers, Ethel Rogers
Page Number: 248
Explanation and Analysis:

Blore and Lombard continue to fixate on the revolver, but Vera becomes frustrated with their narrow-mindedness. She argues that each of the murders must fit into the ten little soldiers nursery rhyme in some way.

Vera’s impassioned tone shows how a sense of desperation has sunk into the characters at this point. Overwhelmed with false clues and misinformation, they have become increasingly disoriented and uncertain in how to proceed. Ironically, Vera exclaims repeatedly about madness even as she herself is becoming less mentally hinged. She thus comes to mimic the manic role of the murderer, a pattern followed by many of the characters.

Perhaps due to this increased similarity, her assertions actually interpret quite accurately the murderer’s intentions. Whereas Blore and Lombard are focused on traditional symbols in a murder case like the revolver, Vera is attentive to the specific conditions of this event. She correctly links each murder to a line in the poem and demands that each event has “got to fit in” to the metaphorical whole. That Christie makes symbolic interpretation of the poem the key to solving the murder further renders Vera an analog to a good reader of the novel.

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Ethel Rogers Character Timeline in And Then There Were None

The timeline below shows where the character Ethel Rogers appears in And Then There Were None. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 2
Guilt Theme Icon
Class Theme Icon
Vera is brought into her room by Mr. Rogers's wife, Mrs. Rogers who Vera thinks looks “frightened of her own shadow.” Vera becomes uncomfortable wondering what this... (full context)
Chapter 3
Guilt Theme Icon
Mr. Rogers and Dr. Armstrong take Mrs. Rogers to bed. Marston says that the needs a drink and he and Lombard come back... (full context)
Chapter 4
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
...but by the time he got back she was dead. The old woman left the Rogerses money in her will. (full context)
Chapter 6
Death Theme Icon
Armstrong goes down to see Mrs. Rogers and sees that she is in fact dead. Armstrong asks Mr. Rogers if he gave... (full context)
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
After breakfast Armstrong tells the rest of the guests that Mrs. Rogers died last night. Armstrong says that he cannot tell how she died. Miss Brent thinks... (full context)
Chapter 7
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
...tries to tell herself to calm down. She asks Miss Brent whether she thinks the Rogerses are really guilty and Miss Brent says that they certainly are. (full context)
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
...and that Anthony Marston must have been murdered. And if Anthony Marston was murdered then Mrs. Rogers must have been murdered, too. They then go over the poem that is hung on... (full context)
Chapter 9
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
...– the deaths were just coincidences. Blore asks Armstrong whether he may have accidentally overdosed Mrs. Rogers on a sleeping pill. Armstrong says that this is ridiculous and Lombard says that they... (full context)
Guilt Theme Icon
...could have drugged Marston but Armstrong or Mr. Rogers are most likely to have killed Mrs. Rogers . But then Wargrave states that really anyone had the chance to do it. (full context)
Epilogue 1
Justice Theme Icon
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
...little evidence. Wargrave and Lombard were shot, Miss Brent and Marston died of cyanide poisoning, Mrs. Rogers died of an overdose of chloral, Rogers head was split open, Blore's head was crushed,... (full context)
Death Theme Icon
...Brent and some notes by Wargrave and Blore. The death occurred in this order: Marston, Mrs. Rogers , Miss Brent, Wargrave. Blore then has a note “Armstrong disappeared.” (full context)
Epilogue 2
Justice Theme Icon
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
...suffer the longest. He believed that Marston had no conscience or moral responsibility and that Mrs. Rogers had been influenced by her husband. For Marston he used potassium cyanide which one can... (full context)