Crime and Punishment

Crime and Punishment

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Dmitri Prokofych Razumikhin Character Analysis

Raskolnikov’s closest and perhaps only friend, Razumikhin becomes an adoptive son to Pulcheria and a husband to Dunya. As Raskolnikov pulls away from the family, Razumikhin grows ever closer. He is a foil to Raskolnikov: a student who is similarly impoverished but who manages to live without committing a crime and without tipping into insanity.

Dmitri Prokofych Razumikhin Quotes in Crime and Punishment

The Crime and Punishment quotes below are all either spoken by Dmitri Prokofych Razumikhin or refer to Dmitri Prokofych Razumikhin. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Vintage edition of Crime and Punishment published in 1993.
Part 2, Chapter 4 Quotes

And if we look straight, in all ways—will there be many good people left? No, in that case I’m sure that I, with all my innards, would be worth about as much as one baked onion!

Related Characters: Dmitri Prokofych Razumikhin (speaker)
Page Number: 133
Explanation and Analysis:

Razumikhin is a counterweight to Raskolnikov in the plot. He, like his friend, believes himself to be "fallen," to be a "sinner," a person capable of bad things. But Razumikhin does not place undue emphasis on this feeling of fallenness. Instead, he takes it as a given, as a condition of humanity - and he attempts to live a good life having accepted it. Thus, Razumikhin is good to Pulcheria and Dunya - he becomes more loving toward them as time passes. And though Raskolnikov believes his only way to make a mark in the world is to commit a horrific crime, Razumikhin, despite his belief that he is far from perfect, attempts to live a balanced and more rational life. He works for his money, continues with his studies, and manages to maintain his sanity. All this while attempted to help Raskolnikov, despite realizing that his friend is perhaps, as the novel goes on, beyond all help entirely. 

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Part 4, Chapter 2 Quotes

You’ve all been saying that I was mad . . . and just now I imagined that perhaps I really am mad and was only seeing a ghost!

Related Characters: Rodion Romanovich Raskolnikov (speaker), Arkady Ivanovich Svidrigailov, Dmitri Prokofych Razumikhin
Page Number: 295
Explanation and Analysis:

At this point in the novel, Raskolnikov's paranoid psychology begins to fold in on itself. For the young man genuinely does wonder, now, if he is crazy, and if the friends he has known for some time appear to him only as illusions - if he can trust his own senses, his ability to understand whatever is going on around him. Indeed, Raskolnikov feels so divorced from the crimes he has committed that he wonders why it is he has committed them - what possibly could have motivated him, and from where those motivations derived.

Razumikhin, for his part, seems more and more convinced that his friend is guilty, at least of something - that he is somehow implicated in the murder that seems always to pique his interest, to cause him to act as though he has an incredible stain of guilt on his soul. But Razumikhin is afraid to bring this up with his friend, perhaps because he is also worried about upsetting someone who is so clearly in a perilous and unstable mental state. 

Part 5, Chapter 5 Quotes

Dunya! This Razumikhin, Dmitri Prokofych, is a very good man . . . He is a practical man, hard-working, honest, and capable of deep love . . . .

Related Characters: Rodion Romanovich Raskolnikov (speaker), Avdotya (Dunya) Romanovna Raskolnikov, Dmitri Prokofych Razumikhin
Page Number: 425
Explanation and Analysis:

By now Raskolnikov has already begin preparing for the future, for a time when he can truly no longer provide for the family, either because he is dead or in prison. (Of course, he has not been providing for the family at all already, and he knows this; but Raskolnikov nevertheless feels it is his duty to designate someone as the family's official "protector" after he is gone.) The arrangement he makes here makes a great deal of sense. Razumikhin is demonstrably in love with Dunya, and he is devoted to Pulcheria as well. He wishes to do all he can to serve Raskolnikov's mother and sister - he is committed to it. In every sense, then, other than the biological one, Razumikhin has become the family member that Dunya and Pulcheria have wanted. He has taken over for Raskolnikov and wishes to do so - and this provides Raskolnikov with a modicum of comfort as he realizes he must confess fully to his crimes. 

Part 6, Chapter 1 Quotes

He’s a political conspirator, he is, for sure, for sure!

Related Characters: Dmitri Prokofych Razumikhin (speaker), Rodion Romanovich Raskolnikov
Page Number: 446
Explanation and Analysis:

Razumikhin seeks whatever justification he can find for his friend's behavior. For indeed it would make a great deal more sense if Raskolnikov were to have committed the murders out of a sense of a political cause, as motivates the people in other Dostoevsky novels. If Raskolnikov desired to overthrow the government, or to make some kind of public political point, then the crimes would still appear horrible and deeply upsetting, but at least would somehow be "rational" or comprehensible. 

Of course, Raskolnikov has not done this - he has not killed for any outward reason, he has sought to make the point that he serves no master, and he has no political end. It would be so much easier if that were the case, if Razumikhin could point to a kind of philosophy or set of beliefs that brought on the crime. And this inability to find a reason is perhaps the most upsetting of the outcomes of Raskolnikov's acts. 

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Dmitri Prokofych Razumikhin Character Timeline in Crime and Punishment

The timeline below shows where the character Dmitri Prokofych Razumikhin appears in Crime and Punishment. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1, Chapter 4
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...that, after reading the letter, he intended to head to the home of his friend Razumikhin, a cheerful and socially-adept student who was Raskolnikov’s only companion at the university. Razumikhin also... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 5
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...know why exactly he wishes to see his friend—he does not really want any of Razumikhin’s teaching lessons, nor does he want advice about Dunya’s situation. But he also does not... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 2
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He finds that he has walked, as if automatically, to his friend Razumikhin’s house. He walks up to the fifth floor and knocks, finding him at home. Razumikhin... (full context)
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Raskolnikov says he is not insane, and gets up to leave. Razumikhin, again surprised, offers to split his translation work with Raskolnikov in order to give him... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 3
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...and an unknown man in the room. Raskolnikov asks the man to identify himself and Razumikhin enters, saying he brought Zossimov the doctor to him twice in his sleep. The man... (full context)
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...for 35 roubles sent by his mother. Raskolnikov initially does not wish to sign but Razumikhin convinces him, and the money is laid out. The agent departs. Razumikhin encourages Raskolnikov to... (full context)
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Razumikhin tells how he found Raskolnikov’s lodgings via the government registry. Razumikhin has come to learn... (full context)
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Although the landlady had decided to “chase Raskolnikov out” of the apartment, Razumikhin has convinced her she ought to care for Raskolnikov and give him more time to... (full context)
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Razumikhin tells Raskolnikov he had been raving in his sleep about scraps of cloth and the... (full context)
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Razumikhin wakes up him several hours later, having arrived with new clothes for his friend. Razumikhin... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 4
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...that he is getting better, although he should continue to rest and avoid unnecessary agitation. Razumikhin reminds Zossimov of his housewarming party that night and expresses a desire that Raskolnikov be... (full context)
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Zossimov begins to criticize Zamyotov for “having an open palm” (being open to bribes), and Razumikhin interrupts to say he is defending the house-painters in the case of the old woman... (full context)
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Zossimov asks why the painters are under suspicion. Razumikhin informs him that Mikolai, one of the painters, pawned off two gold earrings he claimed... (full context)
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Razumikhin claims that numerous witnesses attest to seeing the painters fighting in the building’s courtyard (this... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 5
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A new and unknown man walks in, asking for Raskolnikov, who Razumikhin indicates, brusquely, is the man lying on the sofa. The new man is taken aback... (full context)
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Razumikhin informs Luzhin of Raskolnikov’s illness. Luzhin worries that conversation might further upset the sick man,... (full context)
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...self-interest—the betterment of one’s own condition first—as a means of improving society on the whole. Razumikhin, however, cuts him off and implies that Luzhin merely wishes to demonstrate his intellect. Luzhin... (full context)
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Continuing their previous conversation, Zossimov says to Razumikhin that the old lady’s killer must have been one of her clients. Raskolnikov is upset... (full context)
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Luzhin, Razumikhin, and Zossimov discuss the murder and other recent crimes in Moscow, among the upper, educated... (full context)
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...after all, and he tells everyone, Luzhin foremost, to leave. Luzhin is greatly insulted, and Razumikhin and Zossimov, heading out, discuss how upset Raskolnikov appears to get on mention of the... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 6
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...quickly dresses in his news clothes, pockets the 25 roubles and change left behind by Razumikhin after the clothing purchases, and slips outside unnoticed. On his way to the Haymarket he... (full context)
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As he is leaving, Raskolnikov runs into Razumikhin, who chastises him for going out of the house in his condition. Raskolnikov tells his... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 7
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Raskolnikov heads to Razumikhin’s party. Razumikhin is shocked by Raskolnikov’s frazzled appearance and offers to take him home—he has... (full context)
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...fainting spell at the police station. While mounting the stairs to his room Raskolnikov tells Razumikhin of Marmeladov’s death. It appears that someone is in the room. Pulcheria and Dunya are... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 1
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...sister break off the relationship. Dunya says that Raskolnikov “has no right” to forbid her. Razumikhin escorts both out of the room, hoping to smooth things over while Raskolnikov continues his... (full context)
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Razumikhin, in his drunkenness, calls Luzhin a “scoundrel” for providing the two with such poor lodgings;... (full context)
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It is clear, also, that Razumikhin has taken a liking to Dunya, whom, he believes, will make Raskolnikov’s landlady (whom he... (full context)
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Razumikhin complains, confusedly, to Pulcheria and Dunya of the argument he had at his apartment, with... (full context)
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Razumikhin deposits the two at their apartment. Dunya appears to like Razumikhin though she knows he... (full context)
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...comments on Raskolnikov’s madness have been exaggerated—he believes the condition will pass. Zossimov remarks to Razumikhin, outside, that Dunya is a “ravishing” beauty; Razumikhin, still drunk, rushes at him and pronounces... (full context)
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Razumikhin explains that he has been “courting” Raskolnikov’s landlady, mostly to make things easier materially for... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 2
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Razumikhin awakes with some regret about his behavior the previous day. He is particularly ashamed of... (full context)
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Zossimov arrives and chastises Razumikhin for referring again to the murders in Raskolnikov’s presence the previous day. Zossimov believes Raskolnikov... (full context)
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Pulcheria asks Razumikhin more questions about Raskolnikov’s condition. Razumikhin replies that he is “not a hypochondriac, just inhumanly... (full context)
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Razumikhin recounts Raskolnikov’s reaction to Luzhin the previous day. Unlike the night before, Razumikhin refuses to... (full context)
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...same apartment building), and that Raskolnikov gave 25 rubles to Sonya (instead of to Katerina). Razumikhin recommends that Pulcheria follow Dunya’s preferred course of action and have Raskolnikov present at the... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 3
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...grows upset and yells at everyone, saying they are dull and asking them to speak. Razumikhin speaks of his engagement to the landlady’s daughter, indicating that it was a mistake, an... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 4
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...for planting this idea in her mother’s head. Back in Raskolnikov’s room, Sonya stays while Razumikhin tells his friend that Porfiry, the investigator, is interviewing those who have pawned items with... (full context)
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Walking to Porfiry’s, Razumikhin is curious about when Raskolnikov pawned items at the old crone’s, and seems reassured to... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 5
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Raskolnikov and Razumikhin enter Porfiry’s office laughing, lending, in Raskolnikov’s mind, a “natural” air to his behavior. Razumikhin... (full context)
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...also, of his visit to the pawnbroker’s apartment after the murder. The conversation turns to Razumikhin’s argument with Porfiry from the previous day’s party. Razumikhin begins criticizing a supposed “socialist” view... (full context)
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Razumikhin asks whether Raskolnikov considers himself an extraordinary person permitted to commit crimes—only half seriously. Raskolnikov... (full context)
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...there on the day of the murder but claims not to have seen the painters. Razumikhin, however, steps in and says Raskolnikov must have been mistaken, since he only visited the... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 6
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...Porfiry. He resents that he has been suspected without even a shred of physical evidence. Razumikhin, relieved to be discussing the murder out in the open, admits he has sensed Porfiry’s... (full context)
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...much as he can to officials, strategically, in order to throw them off the scent. Razumikhin goes up to visit Dunya and Pulcheria and Raskolnikov leaves in a huff, returning to... (full context)
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...notably weakened, and is caught again in a flurry of anxieties. He awakes to find Razumikhin and Nastasya present; they leave quickly thereafter. Raskolnikov wonders who this “man from under ground,”... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 2
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Raskolnikov meets with Razumikhin and tells him the man leaving his apartment was Svidrigailov. Raskolnikov hopes that Razumikhin also... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 3
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...the engagement to such an “unworthy” man. Pulcheria is excited about Dunya’s inheritance from Marfa. Razumikhin feels free to love Raskolnikov’s sister. Raskolnikov sits quietly. (full context)
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As Razumikhin, Dunya, and Pulcheria make their plans, Raskolnikov says he must go, and adds, ominously, that... (full context)
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As they stand in the hallway, Raskolnikov tells Razumikhin not to leave his family, and they stare into each other’s eyes. “The hint of... (full context)
Part 5, Chapter 5
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Raskolnikov goes back to his apartment, where Dunya arrives, saying she has spoken to Razumikhin and heard of the suspicions levied against Raskolnikov regarding the murder. Dunya says she understands... (full context)
Part 6, Chapter 1
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Razumikhin visits him in his apartment to ask whether Raskolnikov is mad, and why he has... (full context)
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Raskolnikov tells Razumikhin he has spoken highly of him to his sister, and has said Razumikhin will remain... (full context)
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Razumikhin leaves, believing that Raskolnikov has been involved in a political intrigue and is hiding his... (full context)
Part 6, Chapter 3
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...he has against Raskolnikov to blackmail him and gain power of Dunya. He fears that Razumikhin, who still knows nothing of his guilt, will not be able to stop Svidrigailov from... (full context)
Part 6, Chapter 7
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...his mother, who is now staying with Dunya in a better apartment arranged for by Razumikhin. Pulcheria admits that she has been reading Raskolnikov’s article, and though she does not understand... (full context)
Epilogue, Chapter 1
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Raskolnikov and Sonya left for Siberia together, and Razumikhin married Dunya; Razumikhin hopes to raise enough money to join his friend in Siberia after... (full context)