Crime and Punishment

Crime and Punishment

Pdf fan dd71f526917d6085d66d045bd94fb5b55d02a108dd45d836cbdd4abe2d4c043d Tap here to download this LitChart! (PDF)
Marmeladov’s child from his first marriage, Sonya becomes a prostitute after Katerina complains that she does nothing to help the family financially. She also reads the story of Lazarus to Raskolnikov on his request. Sonya later becomes Raskolnikov’s confidante—the first person to whom he confesses his crime—and travels with him to Siberia, where she pledges to be with him forever.

Sonya Semyonovna Marmeladov Quotes in Crime and Punishment

The Crime and Punishment quotes below are all either spoken by Sonya Semyonovna Marmeladov or refer to Sonya Semyonovna Marmeladov. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Vintage edition of Crime and Punishment published in 1993.
Part 3, Chapter 4 Quotes

Despite her eighteen years, she looked almost like a little girl, much younger than her age . . . and this sometimes even appeared comically in some of her movements.

Related Characters: Sonya Semyonovna Marmeladov
Page Number: 238
Explanation and Analysis:

Sonya is to be Raskolnikov's love interest in the novel, although their romance is far, far from a "standard" one. Raskolnikov's mind is echoed here in the words of the narrator, who states what Raskolnikov perceives: that Sonya is young and largely helpless, that she has been tasked with supporting her family during her father's illness and now after his death, and that, in doing so, she has been made to "grow up" very quickly, more quickly than should be reasonable for someone of her age and temperament.

Raskolnikov feels very fond of Sonya and demonstrates to her what little kindness he is capable of showing anyone - indeed, he is alternately firm, cold, and distant with his sister and mother, and does what he can to create distance between himself and his friend Razumikhin. By the end of the novel, Sonya is the only person with whom Raskolnikov is anywhere near close at all - the only "family" he has left, as they live together during Raskolnikov's banishment in Siberia. 

A+

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other Crime and Punishment quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!
Part 4, Chapter 4 Quotes

Jesus therefore again groaning in himself cometh to the grave . . . . Jesus said, Take ye away the stone. . . . Jesus lifted up his eyes, and said, Father, I thank thee that thou has heard me, . . . and he cried with a loud voice, Lazarus, come forth. And he that was dead came forth.

Related Characters: Sonya Semyonovna Marmeladov (speaker)
Related Symbols: Lazarus
Page Number: 327
Explanation and Analysis:

This passage comes from one of the recurring motifs in the work. Raskolnikov asks Sonya to read from this passage in the Gospels, because he identifies deeply with Lazarus, a man who was dead and was revived, a man who has seen "the other side" and returned to life, but who has difficulty describing what he has passed through. Perhaps Raskolnikov, although he does not state this directly, worries that he, too, might only be "purified" through dying, as Lazarus has died. He fears that the only method of escaping his own guilt is to die. Or perhaps Raskolnikov merely marvels at the wonder of Jesus having brought someone back to life before Jesus' own resurrection in the Gospels. Raskolnikov does not come out and explicitly identify why he is so fixated on this story - but the idea of rebirth, of being dragged from death back into life, is an object of clear fascination for him. 

Epilogue, Chapter 2 Quotes

At the beginning of their happiness there were moments when they were both ready to look at those seven years as if they were seven days. He did not even know that a new life would not be given him for nothing, that it still had to be dearly bought, to be paid for with a great future deed . . . .

Related Characters: Rodion Romanovich Raskolnikov, Sonya Semyonovna Marmeladov
Related Symbols: Lazarus
Page Number: 551
Explanation and Analysis:

Here Dostoevsky discusses another fundamentally Christian idea, that of redemption. The time in the camp is nothing compared to cosmic time - the chain of human existence moving forward and backward from Raskolnikov's and Sonya's time on earth. Thus Raskolnikov, who has found religion during his time away in the penal colony, and who has dedicated his life to living well and to helping Sonya, knows that he must somehow do something "great" in the future to make up for the harm he has caused others. 

He does not know exactly what this deed might be, and in this way the author leaves open the end of the novel for a possible sequel (never written). But Raskolnikov is also ennobled at this thought. For though a great future deed might be a difficult one to achieve, it is also a deed that remains possible - it is an indication of hope. Before, Raskolnikov had no hope, and he committed the murders in part because he felt his life to be without future and without direction. Even though a good deal of hard work lies in front of him, he nevertheless has found that future and that hope, as the author takes pains to make clear. 

Get the entire Crime and Punishment LitChart as a printable PDF.
Crime and punishment.pdf.medium

Sonya Semyonovna Marmeladov Character Timeline in Crime and Punishment

The timeline below shows where the character Sonya Semyonovna Marmeladov appears in Crime and Punishment. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1, Chapter 2
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...live at Fyodorovna Lippewechsel’s house. Marmeladov then speaks of his daughter from his first marriage, Sonya, whom he tried to educate in her youth, before the family ran out of money. (full context)
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Earlier Katerina complained that Sonya, old enough to work, was not contributing to the family’s welfare. Marmeladov tells of one... (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Sonya is forced to carry a “yellow pass,” indicating she is a prostitute. Marmeladov then reveals... (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Marmeladov went to his supervisor after Sonya’s dismissal and begged for one more chance at his job, which he was granted. Marmeladov’s... (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...and, for the past five days has been inebriated and sleeping outside. He even asked Sonya for a little extra money for a final bottle, which she gave him. Marmeladov drinks... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 4
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...Dunya were to marry for his sake, she would be “no better” than the prostitute Sonya. Raskolnikov becomes more and more upset and declares, finally, that he will not accept Dunya’s... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 7
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...rushes into action and is extremely upset; she sends her oldest daughter Polenka to fetch Sonya. Raskolnikov calls for a doctor, who lives close by. (full context)
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...is called and administers last rites. Katerina cries with the children and Polenka returns with Sonya. (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...drunkenness; the priest argues that this lack of forgiveness is “a great sin.” Marmeladov sees Sonya, asks her for forgiveness, then dies; Katerina asks who will provide for the funeral expenses. (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...is soaked in (Marmeladov’s) blood. Raskolnikov agrees. As he is walking outside Polenka, sent by Sonya, asks for Raskolnikov’s name. He tells Polenka to pray for her father and for himself.... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 2
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...Marmeladov’s (Luzhin lives in the same apartment building), and that Raskolnikov gave 25 rubles to Sonya (instead of to Katerina). Razumikhin recommends that Pulcheria follow Dunya’s preferred course of action and... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 3
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...recent letter and corrects Luzhin, saying that he gave the money to Katerina, not to Sonya. He believes Luzhin is trying to impute a base motive to Raskolnikov in connecting him... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 4
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Sonya arrives at Raskolnikov's apartment, abashedly, and Raskolnikov realizes that her arrival in the room seems... (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Outside, Pulcheria tells Dunya that Raskolnikov appears quite ill. Pulcheria believes that Sonya might be at the root of her son’s troubles, but Dunya blames Luzhin for planting... (full context)
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Sonya thanks Raskolnikov again for his kindness. Raskolnikov promises to visit Sonya, which makes her nervous... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 6
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
...willpower of a man like Napoleon or Muhammad. He then thinks of “poor” Lizaveta and Sonya, the weak of the earth, and remarks that he rarely considers the fact that he... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 2
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...about Raskolnikov’s actions the night of Marmeladov’s death, for he gave the roubles not to Sonya but to Katerina. Raskolnikov reports that Sonya, too, is not so fallen and depraved a... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 4
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Raskolnikov heads to Sonya’s apartment, in the home of Kapernaumov the tailor. He knocks and she allows him to... (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
When Raskolnikov accuses Katerina of having beaten Sonya, Sonya says that she loves her stepmother and recognizes that she, Sonya, must work now... (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Raskolnikov tells Sonya that consumption will eventually kill Katerina, and that Polenka might also be forced into prostitution... (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Raskolnikov thinks to himself that Sonya has only three options: to kill herself, to go insane, or to “descend into depravity.”... (full context)
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...days. At this point the Jews assembled believe that Jesus is the son of God. Sonya trembles upon finishing, and Raskolnikov tells her that today he left his mother and sister. (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...“the same path,” and that they must have “freedom . . . freedom and power.” Sonya is frightened. Raskolnikov promises that, if he returns tomorrow, he will do so to tell... (full context)
Part 5, Chapter 1
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Their conversation turns to Sonya: Luzhin asks whether, according to the “new ideas,” Sonya’s prostitution is wrong. Lebezyatnikov replies that... (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...yesterday by Dunya and Pulcheria. Luzhin is angered but asks Lebezyatnikov whether he can’t call Sonya over to speak with them. Lebezyatnikov does so and Sonya enters. Luzhin gives his condolences... (full context)
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Luzhin expresses a desire to help Sonya and the family, since he recognizes that they now depend on Sonya for support. Luzhin... (full context)
Part 5, Chapter 2
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Katerina has spent nearly ten roubles on the funeral feast—an enormous sum for her—and Sonya begins to fear that Katerina is losing her senses. Amalia the landlady helps Katerina in... (full context)
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...Amalia the landlady’s snobbery, and, between coughs, ridicules her other guests, whispering in his ear. Sonya enters, bringing Luzhin’s apologies that he cannot attend. This pleases Katerina. (full context)
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...continues to ridicule the guests, and one remarks on Marmeladov’s drinking problem, increasing her consternation. Sonya worries that her stepmother is going to cause a scene. Katerina appears to believe, based... (full context)
Part 5, Chapter 3
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
...his support in her quarrel, but Luzhin replies he has instead come to speak with Sonya. Luzhin announces, in a “businesslike tone,” that a 100-rouble note has disappeared from his room;... (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Katerina goes on to say that Luzhin cannot prove his assertions. Katerina turns inside-out Sonya’s pockets, revealing the 100-rouble note, and Amalia demands that the police be brought around to... (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Lebezyatnikov claims that Luzhin placed the note in Sonya’s pocket unbeknownst to her, and Lebezyatnikov assumed at the time either that Luzhin was being... (full context)
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...the room now on Lebezyatnikov’s side, and the latter asks Luzhin to vacate their apartment. Sonya, terribly upset, leaves, and Amalia uses this further ruckus against Katerina, demanding that her family... (full context)
Part 5, Chapter 4
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
He realizes, on entering, that he must tell Sonya he has murdered Lizaveta. Sonya thanks him for defending her earlier, at the feast, and... (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Raskolnikov repeats his desire to tell Sonya who murdered Lizaveta. He says that the murderer aimed to kill and rob the pawnbroker... (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Sonya promises to follow Raskolnikov wherever he goes. When Raskolnikov begins to explain why he killed... (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...financial circumstances and he was upset at not being able to attend university any longer. Sonya realizes, however, that Raskolnikov might be mad, and that his reasons for killing might be... (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...final attempt to justify his murder, or at least clarify why he has done it. Sonya refuses his justifications and argues that Raskolnikov has simply committed a crime against man and... (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...only “psychology” and does not include facts pertaining to his guilt. He asks, however, if Sonya will visit him if he goes to jail. Sonya says yes. Sonya offers Raskolnikov a... (full context)
Part 5, Chapter 5
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...to the bridge over the canal where Katerina and the children are performing. Katerina tells Sonya, who attempts to help her, to leave, and Katerina corrects the children’s singing and dancing.... (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Running after the dispersed crowd, Katerina falls and begins coughing up blood heavily. Sonya and the others fear that she is dying and carry her back to Sonya’s apartment.... (full context)
Part 6, Chapter 1
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...aside to send the children to a good orphanage. Raskolnikov attends Katerina’s memorial service with Sonya and realizes that, if he could get away from everyone and be completely alone, he... (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...has abandoned his mother and sister. His mother complains that Raskolnikov is hanging about with Sonya, whom she calls “that one.” Razumikhin concludes that Raskolnikov does not seem mad, and that... (full context)
Part 6, Chapter 5
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...of Raskolnikov. Svidrigailov convinces Dunya to follow him back to his apartment, where he wishes Sonya to corroborate his story about Raskolnikov. Sonya is still not home, but Svidrigailov invites Dunya... (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...that he knows the truth, and that he heard Raskolnikov spill out his soul to Sonya over the course of two nights. Dunya has a hard time believing the terrible truth... (full context)
Part 6, Chapter 6
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
...taverns. He decides later in the evening to go back to the apartment-house and visit Sonya, who is at home. He gives Sonya 3,000 roubles and says that, for Raskolnikov, there... (full context)
Part 6, Chapter 8
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Raskolnikov visits Sonya, who has been waiting for him all day. She worries that a fear of death... (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
He states his desire to go and confess to the police alone, though Sonya wants to accompany him. He wonders still if there isn’t some way to avoid having... (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...having the courage to confess and rattled by Svidrigailov’s death. In the courtyard he finds Sonya, who wordlessly urges him back into the station to admit to his crime. He turns... (full context)
Epilogue, Chapter 1
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Raskolnikov and Sonya left for Siberia together, and Razumikhin married Dunya; Razumikhin hopes to raise enough money to... (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Raskolnikov only learns of his mother’s death much later. Sonya has maintained a correspondence with Petersburg, and in her letters she details Raskolnikov’s captivity in... (full context)
Epilogue, Chapter 2
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...himself. He is taken for Godless by some of the fellow prisoners, but they love Sonya, whom they consider a saint, and eventually grow to tolerate Raskolnikov. When he is in... (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Raskolnikov hears that Sonya is sick and worries about her health, but it is only a passing cold. He... (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
He recognizes the manner in which Sonya loves him—that indeed she lives entirely for him—and this has given him strength to be... (full context)
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...for another novel, and the narrator concludes the present story with this fleeting reference to Sonya and Raskolnikov’s future happiness. (full context)