Love's Labor's Lost

Pdf fan dd71f526917d6085d66d045bd94fb5b55d02a108dd45d836cbdd4abe2d4c043d Tap here to download this LitChart! (PDF)
Armado’s young page, Mote (spelled “Moth” in some editions) is surprisingly intelligent given his young age and relatively low social status. He is able to outwit and poke fun at his superiors, including Armado, Holofernes, and Nathaniel, of whom he quips, “they have been at a great feast of languages and stolen the scraps.”

Mote Quotes in Love's Labor's Lost

The Love's Labor's Lost quotes below are all either spoken by Mote or refer to Mote. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Love Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Simon & Schuster edition of Love's Labor's Lost published in 2005.
Act 5, Scene 1 Quotes

They have been at a great feast of languages and stolen the scraps.

Related Characters: Mote (speaker)
Page Number: 5.1.38-39
Explanation and Analysis:

Holofernes, Nathaniel, and Dull have been conversing in some Latin, making fun of one another, and bragging about their intelligence as they usually do. But here, Mote makes a clever aside to Costard, implying that Holofernes and Nathaniel aren't as smart as they think they are. Again, we see Mote's wittiness and brilliance on display. In this play, we see constant reversals of who is supposed to be intelligent and witty and who actually is. The educated men are ridiculous, and Mote (a servant) and the women (supposed to be less intelligent because of their gender) demonstrate the most wit and skill with language in the play. Mote hasn't had access to as much education as the other men (who've had access to "a great feast of languages") but he still knows more than the "scraps" they've taken.

A+

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other Love's Labor's Lost quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!
Get the entire Love's Labor's Lost LitChart as a printable PDF.
Love s labor s lost.pdf.medium

Mote Character Timeline in Love's Labor's Lost

The timeline below shows where the character Mote appears in Love's Labor's Lost. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act 1, Scene 2
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
Armado asks his page Mote what it means when a man is melancholy. The boy answers that it means the... (full context)
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
Armado and Mote go off on a digression of wordplay. Armado says that he has promised to study... (full context)
Love Theme Icon
Men and Women Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
Armado confesses that he is in love with a “base wench.” He asks Mote to name some “great men” who have also been in love. The page names Hercules... (full context)
Love Theme Icon
Men and Women Theme Icon
Armado asks Mote about a ballad concerning a king’s love for a beggar, because he wishes to justify... (full context)
Love Theme Icon
Men and Women Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
...he can begin fasting on a full stomach, and asks Armado not to imprison him. Mote takes Costard away, leaving Armado by himself. Armado says he loves the very ground Jaquenetta... (full context)
Act 3, Scene 1
Love Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
Work, Pleasure, and Comedy Theme Icon
Armado tells his page Mote to free Costard and bring him so that Armado can have him take a love... (full context)
Love Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
Mote says that Armado loves Jacquenetta “by, in, and without” his heart: his heart cannot come... (full context)
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
Mote leaves, and Armado compliments his “acute” wit. Mote returns with Costard and Armado greets him... (full context)
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
...Costard “remuneration” in the form of a coin for the favor, and then leaves with Mote. Costard examines the coin and thinks that “remuneration” is “a fairer name than ‘French crown.’” (full context)
Act 5, Scene 1
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
...and Nathaniel converse a bit in Latin, and then Armado enters along with Costard and Mote. (full context)
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
Mote pokes fun at Holofernes and Nathaniel, saying “they have been at a great feast of... (full context)
Men and Women Theme Icon
Work, Pleasure, and Comedy Theme Icon
...famous men from ancient and biblical to medieval times. He casts Armado, Nathaniel, Costard, and Mote in the performance and says that he himself will play three parts. Dull plans to... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 2
Intelligence Theme Icon
Work, Pleasure, and Comedy Theme Icon
Mote, Ferdinand, Berowne, Longaville, and Dumaine arrive in Russian dress. The princess and her ladies put... (full context)
Men and Women Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
Work, Pleasure, and Comedy Theme Icon
...Boyet again heckle the performer. Nathaniel leaves and Holofernes enters as Judas Maccabaeus along with Mote as the young Hercules. Holofernes announces Mote’s character, and then Mote leaves. He says, “Judas... (full context)
Work, Pleasure, and Comedy Theme Icon
Holofernes, Nathaniel, Mote, and Costard return to the stage. Everyone divides into two groups, one representing spring and... (full context)