Pride and Prejudice

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Bingley's closest friend, the brother of Georgiana, and the nephew of Lady Catherine de Bourgh. Darcy is very wealthy and a person of great integrity, but his extreme class-consciousness makes him appear vain and proud. He finds Elizabeth attractive, even ideal, but is clumsy in expressing his feelings and disdains her sometimes crass family. Elizabeth's harsh appraisal of him compels him to reassess his behavior and attitudes. Her intelligence and her disregard for mere social rank teaches him to see people more for who they are, rather than the status in to which they were born.

Fitzwilliam Darcy Quotes in Pride and Prejudice

The Pride and Prejudice quotes below are all either spoken by Fitzwilliam Darcy or refer to Fitzwilliam Darcy. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Penguin Classics edition of Pride and Prejudice published in 2002.
Chapter 3 Quotes
His character was decided. He was the proudest, most disagreeable man in the world, and everybody hoped that he would never come there again.
Related Characters: Fitzwilliam Darcy
Page Number: 13
Explanation and Analysis:

Elizabeth is about to overhear Darcy say to Bingley that Elizabeth isn't pretty enough for him to ask her to dance, so he'll prefer to ask no one. Darcy has acted proud and aloof throughout the dance, and this is the last straw for Elizabeth. Here, Austen screens a description of Darcy through the opinions of "everybody" at the party. Elizabeth may be making a relatively quick judgment about Darcy's character, but at least she is not alone in her judgment. Indeed, the fact that certain prejudices are shared by the majority of people in this small community is often what will allow them to be sustained for so long.

Darcy's coldness is not just looked down upon by the partygoers because he is rude; his attitude also suggests that he does not consider the others worthy of his attentions or of his politeness. As a result, their natural response is to act the same way towards him. Pride often kicks in, in the book, as a defense mechanism to prevent feelings of shame or inferiority, and here is the first major example of such a reaction.

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Chapter 7 Quotes
Darcy had at first scarcely allowed her to be pretty ... But no sooner had he made it clear to himself and his friends that she hardly had a good feature in her face, than he began to find it was rendered uncommonly intelligent by the beautiful expression of her dark eyes ... he was forced to acknowledge her figure to be light and pleasing; and in spite of his asserting that her manners were not those of the fashionable world, he was caught by their easy playfulness.
Related Characters: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet, Fitzwilliam Darcy
Page Number: 24
Explanation and Analysis:

Elizabeth has walked three miles to Netherfield in order to look after Jane, who has fallen ill, and Darcy - who is at Netherfield as well - is impressed both by her insistence on running after her sister (something that other characters find unladylike) and by how pretty she looks as she arrives, anxious and eyes shining. Darcy too had leapt to conclusions the first time he had seen Elizabeth, affected by the assumptions of his class and social environment that found her wanting in several aspects. Now, however, when he considers her more closely, he finds that she is pleasing both physically and in terms of her spirit and intelligence. While this passage is an example of Darcy's slow maturation, as he opens his mind to the possibility of liking Elizabeth, it also underlines the way men saw and judged women at the time, frankly and even like property that they might be interested in.

Chapter 33 Quotes
If his own vanity, however, did not mislead him, he was the cause, his pride and caprice were the cause, of all that Jane had suffered, and still continued to suffer. He had ruined for a while every hope of happiness for the most affectionate, generous heart in the world; and no one could say how lasting an evil he might have inflicted.
Related Characters: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet, Fitzwilliam Darcy, Jane Bennet
Page Number: 182
Explanation and Analysis:

Speaking with Colonel Fitzwilliams, Elizabeth learns that Darcy - a friend of his - has intervened to stop Bingley from making an "impudent marriage." Elizabeth realizes that he must be talking about Bingley's relationship with her sister Jane. She is appalled, and immediately takes the opportunity to condemn Darcy with all her judgment. She particularly criticizes his pride, as she assumes that he considers the Bennet girls too lowly and unworthy for a gentleman like himself and his friend Bingley. 

Although this understanding of marriage was relatively common at the time, Elizabeth takes a quite different opinion. She argues internally that Jane's character is so unblemished that anyone would be lucky to marry her, regardless of his fortune. It is Jane's unquestionable goodness that makes Darcy's actions such a crime in Elizabeth's eyes (not to mention her sense of pride in response to the notion that her family is more unworthy than others). Darcy sinks even lower in her estimation, even as she decides not to try to confirm her assumption by talking to Fitzwilliam.

Chapter 34 Quotes
"In vain I have struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you." ... He spoke well; but there were feelings besides those of the heart to be detailed; and he was not more eloquent on the subject of tenderness than of pride. His sense of her inferiority—of its being a degradation—of the family obstacles which had always opposed to inclination, were dwelt on with a warmth which seemed due to the consequence he was wounding
Related Characters: Fitzwilliam Darcy (speaker), Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet
Page Number: 185
Explanation and Analysis:

Darcy arrives at the Bennet home to make an offer of marriage to Elizabeth, something that shocks her entirely. Although Elizabeth admires Darcy's eloquence, her pride is deeply hurt by just how much he lingers on everything that counts against her, everything in spite of which he still, strangely, loves and wants to marry her. Darcy says that his feelings are real and strong, but then he lingers over her inferior social situation and her embarrassing family. As he enumerates the list, he seems cold and calculating: his first words about his "ardent" admiration and love begin to seem totally out of place, if not a painful joke.

We see here, however, just how knotty a problem it was at this time for people from even slightly different social stations to marry. Darcy believes he is simply being honest, and that by showing how society strives against such a marriage, he will flatter Elizabeth - since he still wants to marry her even so. But Elizabeth, proud as she is, cannot understand how Darcy can be both in love with her and conscious of her inferiority. Such an attitude towards a future partner utter disqualifies him from her consideration. Of course, Elizabeth already knows exactly what she thinks about Darcy, so it is doubtful that anything he would say would be considered positively or generously by her.

Chapter 36 Quotes
I, who have prided myself on my discernment!—I, who have valued myself on my abilities! who have often disdained the generous candour of my sister, and gratified my vanity in useless or blameable mistrust.—How humiliating is this discovery!—Yet, how just a humiliation! ... Pleased with the preference of one, and offended by the neglect of the other, on the very beginning of our acquaintance, I have courted prepossession and ignorance, and driven reason away, where either were concerned. Till this moment, I never knew myself.
Related Characters: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet, Fitzwilliam Darcy, George Wickham
Page Number: 202
Explanation and Analysis:

Elizabeth has read Darcy's long letter explaining himself, and although she only slowly begins to realize its truth, she soon accepts it and then turns to a contemplation of her own character and of her own mistakes. This interior monologue, in which Elizabeth flits from thought to thought, is a kind of epiphany: thanks to the letter, she sees her past and those around her in an entirely new light. It is only now that Elizabeth understands the full implications of her prejudice. She had always thought this attitude superior to that of Jane's, because it allowed her to be a good judge of character and separate the good from the ill. Now, however, she recognizes that her mistrust was completely baseless, and that she would have done well to follow the unprejudiced attitude of her sister.

In addition, Elizabeth has to come to terms with the painful realization that she has acted precisely opposite to the way she should have, prizing one man over another and courting unsavory values as opposed to defensible ones. It was her pride, among other things, that led to her stubborn judgments of Darcy, as well as to her prejudice in favor of Wickham. Elizabeth's mistake is thus humiliating because of the consequences it has for how she has treated other people; but it is also so painful because she realizes only now just how little self-knowledge she really had.

Chapter 40 Quotes
There certainly was some great mismanagement in the education of those two young men. One has got all the goodness, and the other all the appearance of it.
Related Characters: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet (speaker), Fitzwilliam Darcy, George Wickham
Page Number: 217
Explanation and Analysis:

Elizabeth is relating to her sister Jane everything that has happened and what she has learned since reading Darcy's letter. Here, she makes some remarks that sum up much of what she has realized about the two men, Darcy and Wickham: while Wickham has succeeded in convincing everyone around him that he is good, only Darcy is truly a good person. Darcy and Wickham have been paired at various points in the book: not only are they Elizabeth's two main love interests, but they allow Austen to develop a more nuanced account of prejudice and judgment by considering both men and both cases. Austen is not against all judgment: indeed, Elizabeth's pronouncement here can be considered another judgment itself. Instead, the book makes it clear that initial prejudice can often cloud rational thinking and prevent true, proper judgment - a process that only time, patience, and humility will allow to unfold.

Chapter 43 Quotes
Elizabeth was delighted. She had never seen a place for which nature had done more, or where natural beauty had been so little counteracted by an awkward taste. They were all of them warm in their admiration; and at that moment she felt that to be mistress of Pemberley might be something!
Related Characters: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet, Fitzwilliam Darcy
Related Symbols: Houses
Page Number: 235
Explanation and Analysis:

Elizabeth is touring Pemberley, Darcy's estate, and she is impressed by the beauty of the place. Elizabeth has never been vain or silly (like her sister Lydia), and this is one of the few times that she seems enraptured by something so material as an estate. Still, Pemberley is closely linked in her mind with Darcy as a person, and as she tours it she cannot help but imagine a life that might have been possible for her, had she not made the mistake of rejecting his proposal.

Elizabeth does not really feel at home with her own family, and she knows that as a young lady without a fortune she cannot create a home for herself without a husband. At Pemberley she indulges in the thought that being with Darcy would have allowed her to have this kind of home, with all the order and stability that stems from it, and even to be "mistress" of a place. Elizabeth's fanciful thoughts are less rational than is usually the case for her, but they are meant to show just how powerful the symbols of class and class stability can be for someone in a vulnerable position at this time.

Chapter 44 Quotes
When she saw him thus seeking the acquaintance and courting the good opinion of people with whom any intercourse a few months ago would have been a disgrace—when she saw him thus civil, not only to herself, but to the very relations whom he had openly disdained ... the difference, the change was so great, and struck so forcibly on her mind, that she could hardly restrain her astonishment from being visible.
Related Characters: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet, Fitzwilliam Darcy
Page Number: 251
Explanation and Analysis:

Darcy has come to see Elizabeth and Jane with their relatives the Gardiners, and has even brought his sister Georgiana. The Gardiners are just the example of the kind of inferior relations that Darcy had mentioned when making his awkward proposal of marriage. Now that Elizabeth has rid herself of her prejudice against Darcy, she sees his tone and actions with new eyes: but it also seems true that Darcy's own attitude has shifted. A great part of the reason that Elizabeth had long wanted nothing to do with Darcy was that he looked down on her and her family, making her natural, even defensive feeling of pride kick in: now that reason seems no longer to exist. We are meant now to take Elizabeth's judgments at her word, having witnessed her epiphany and painful acceptance of the fact that she judged too quickly before. Now, instead, she pays close attention to what surrounds her so as to make the most accurate judgment possible. 

Chapter 52 Quotes
They owed the restoration of Lydia, her character, every thing, to him. Oh! how heartily did she grieve over every ungracious sensation she had ever encouraged, every saucy speech she had ever directed towards him. For herself she was humbled; but she was proud of him. Proud that in a cause of compassion and honour, he had been able to get the better of himself.
Related Characters: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet, Fitzwilliam Darcy, Lydia Bennet
Page Number: 309
Explanation and Analysis:

Elizabeth learns from Mrs. Gardiner's letter that it was in fact Darcy who negotiated Lydia's and Wickham's marriage and paid Wickham off, asking only that Mr. Gardiner take the credit so that his generosity might remain secret. Now Darcy grows in even greater estimation in Elizabeth's eyes. She is once again reminded of how she allowed too-quick prejudices to cloud her opinion of him, whereas now she has subtle but concrete proof of Darcy's goodness and humility.

Elizabeth recognizes, too, that pride doesn't always have to be a vice: you can be humble yourself but proud of other people, in which case the sentiment becomes virtuous. She knows that Darcy isn't perfect - he has the tendency to be proud just like her - but she realizes that he has conquered his innate sense of class differences in order to help a family in desperate need. As a result she only admires him more.

Chapter 57 Quotes
That is what makes it amusing. Had they fixed on any other man it would have been nothing; but his perfect indifference, and your pointed dislike, make it so delightfully absurd!
Related Characters: Mr. Bennet (speaker), Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet, Fitzwilliam Darcy
Page Number: 344
Explanation and Analysis:

Mr. Bennet has called Elizabeth in to share with her a rumor that is going around about Elizabeth's and Darcy's possible engagement. Mr. Bennet thinks that such a thought is wild and hilarious. He is absolutely certain that Darcy has no interest in Elizabeth, and that the same is true from his daughter to Darcy. Mr. Bennet has largely stayed out of his daughter's love interests and affairs before, and he doesn't meddle in them now, but his comment reflects the fact that he does have an opinion on what goes on even if he doesn't interfere. 

Elizabeth is embarrassed that her father has miscalculated so wildly. Like Elizabeth, in fact, he has judged the possible relation between her and Darcy and found there to be nothing that could possibly develop between them. Mr. Bennet's comment is thus meant to show once again how wrongheaded quick prejudice can be, not to mention painful for the parties involved.

Chapter 58 Quotes
What do I not owe you! You taught me a lesson, hard indeed at first, but most advantageous. By you, I was properly humbled. I came to you without a doubt of my reception. You showed me how insufficient were all my pretensions to please a woman worthy of being pleased.
Related Characters: Fitzwilliam Darcy (speaker), Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet
Page Number: 349
Explanation and Analysis:

Elizabeth and Darcy have finally met in private again, and Elizabeth breaks propriety to confess that she knows about all Darcy did for Lydia. She is willing to risk being overly frank because she wants Darcy to know just how much gratitude she has for him, and just how much her prejudiced feelings towards him have shifted since their last meeting. Darcy, in turn, is utterly gracious as he reflects on Elizabeth's refusal of his offer of marriage. The refusal was a blow to his pride, of course, but it helped him to realize just how much he needed to be humbled, just how much he needed to ease his sense of pride and entitlement. Elizabeth has grown in his estimation since he asked her to marry him, and both of them have learned important lessons in the meantime. 

Chapter 60 Quotes
The fact is, that you were sick of civility, of deference, of officious attention. You were disgusted with the women who were always speaking, and looking, and thinking for your approbation alone. I roused, and interested you, because I was so unlike them.
Related Characters: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet (speaker), Fitzwilliam Darcy
Page Number: 359
Explanation and Analysis:

Elizabeth and Darcy finally directly broach the topic of their mutual prejudice and suspicion, as well as how those feelings began to loosen for each of them. Here Elizabeth suggests that it is precisely because she was not like other upper-class women, because she did not align with the assumptions of how ladies in her station should act, that Darcy slowly found himself attracted to her - even though Darcy always officially scorned women who failed to align with propriety. Elizabeth has a different view of marriage than many of her peers: she puts a great deal of emphasis on character, and this passage highlights how important she finds mutual attraction based on personality rather than on looks or on economic or social factors. Still, the fact that it took so long for Darcy to realize that he felt differently reminds us just how strongly he was influenced by the social ideas of what marriage should look like. 

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Fitzwilliam Darcy Character Timeline in Pride and Prejudice

The timeline below shows where the character Fitzwilliam Darcy appears in Pride and Prejudice. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 3
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...with his sister Mrs. Hurst and her husband, his youngest sister Caroline, and his friend Darcy for the upcoming ball. (full context)
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The ball takes place at Meryton, where the locals gossip about the newcomers. Darcy is handsome but proud and aloof. Bingley makes friends with everyone, dancing every dance, including... (full context)
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Elizabeth overhears Bingley tell Darcy that Jane is the most beautiful girl he's ever seen. Bingley demands that Darcy find... (full context)
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...details. She is excited for Jane and convinced of Bingley's interest in her, and detests Darcy for his attitude about Elizabeth. (full context)
Chapter 4
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Bingley and Darcy's friendship is explained as a meeting of opposites: Bingley's easy manner and Darcy's more stringent... (full context)
Chapter 5
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Everyone agrees that Bingley liked Jane. The conversation quickly shifts to Darcy. Apparently he offended everyone who tried to speak with him. Charlotte consoles Elizabeth about Darcy's... (full context)
Chapter 6
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Meanwhile, as he spends more time with her, Darcy begins to notice Elizabeth's beauty and verve. At a party, Sir William Lucas tries to... (full context)
Chapter 7
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...Netherfield to care for Jane, arriving dirty and tired. Caroline later mocks Elizabeth's appearance, but Darcy is moved by the glow of exercise on Elizabeth's face. Jane's condition soon worsens and... (full context)
Chapter 8
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...family situation—having few connections and no money—will block her hopes of making a good match. Darcy agrees. (full context)
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...look through some books instead of joining in cards. Caroline, who has been absorbed with Darcy, asks him about his estate, Pemberley, and about his sister, who she deems a very... (full context)
Chapter 9
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...Jane's status, tries to impress Bingley about her family and their situation in the country. Darcy suggests that one finds more variety of character in town than in the country, but... (full context)
Chapter 10
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...next day, Elizabeth joins the evening party in the drawing room. Caroline looks on as Darcy tries to write a letter. Trying to flatter him, she offers empty compliments about his... (full context)
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Elizabeth and Darcy get into an argument about Bingley's character. Darcy says that people should always follow their... (full context)
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As Bingley's sisters sing at the piano, Elizabeth notices that she seems to fascinate Darcy. He asks her to dance and she playfully refuses. Still, Darcy is bewitched: he thinks... (full context)
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Caroline is increasingly jealous. The next day, she takes Darcy on a walk to tease him about marrying Elizabeth and about the awful family he... (full context)
Chapter 11
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...join the group. Bingley dotes on her and talks to no one else. Caroline, watching Darcy read, pretends to be absorbed in reading a book. But she's soon bored and suggests... (full context)
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Caroline invites Darcy to join them, but he says he doesn't want to interfere: they must either be... (full context)
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...to laugh at what is ridiculous, which leads to a discussion of the aspects of Darcy's character that might be ridiculed. Darcy claims that his main fault is that "my good... (full context)
Chapter 12
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Darcy is relieved: he is starting to worry that his attraction to Elizabeth might show, so... (full context)
Chapter 15
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Just then, Bingley and Darcy come up the street and stop to chat. When Darcy and Wickham see each other,... (full context)
Chapter 16
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...pleasant demeanor. The two of them easily fall into conversation and Wickham soon asks about Darcy. Elizabeth says he is widely disliked for his pride. Wickham withholds an opinion out of... (full context)
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Wickham explains that he was the son of one of Darcy's father's employees, and that he and Darcy grew up together. Darcy's father died and left... (full context)
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...hearing Mr. Collins go on about Lady Catherine, informs Elizabeth that Lady Catherine is actually Darcy's aunt. He adds that Lady Catherine apparently hopes to marry Darcy to her daughter. (full context)
Chapter 17
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The next day, Elizabeth tells Jane what she learned. Jane cannot believe that Darcy could be so blameworthy and that there must be other parts to the story. But... (full context)
Chapter 18
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...Netherfield, Elizabeth is disappointed to realize that Wickham is not at the party. Elizabeth blames Darcy for Wickham's absence. She endures two dreadful dances with Mr. Collins. (full context)
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Darcy then asks Elizabeth for a dance. Caught by surprise, she accepts. Their conversation is short... (full context)
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Afterwards, Caroline approaches Elizabeth about Wickham. He wasn't wronged by Darcy, she says. On the contrary, Wickham treated Darcy terribly and now Darcy has nothing to... (full context)
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The rest of the evening is a disaster. Mr. Collins rudely introduces himself to Darcy and later pontificates to the whole assembly. Darcy overhears Mrs. Bennet talking about Jane and... (full context)
Chapter 21
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...sisters walk to Meryton and meet Wickham who confirms to Elizabeth that he was avoiding Darcy at the ball. He walks them home and Elizabeth introduces him to her parents. (full context)
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...ever. Caroline ends the letter by saying that she will be delighted to see Georgiana Darcy again, who she hopes will become Bingley's wife. Jane is despondent and refuses to believe... (full context)
Chapter 23
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...to Caroline. Elizabeth believes in Bingley truly cares for Jane, but fears that his sisters, Darcy, and London will prove stronger than his love for Jane. (full context)
Chapter 24
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Caroline writes back: Bingley will certainly be gone for awhile and everyone is delighted with Darcy's sister, Georgiana. Jane tries to put on a brave face, telling Elizabeth that Bingley has... (full context)
Chapter 28
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...Rosings. Elizabeth smirks that the sickly Miss De Bourgh will make the perfect wife for Darcy. (full context)
Chapter 30
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Lady Catherine has arranged a visit from her nephews: Darcy (her favorite) and Colonel Fitzwilliam, his cousin. Upon their arrival, Mr. Collins brings them home... (full context)
Chapter 31
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...along very well. During one visit to Rosings, he asks Elizabeth to play the piano. Darcy leaves his aunt to watch, and Elizabeth playfully accuses him of spreading her poor musical... (full context)
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Darcy tries to excuse his behavior at the ball by saying that he lacks the conversational... (full context)
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...the conversation, and praises her daughter's musical potential—if only she were healthy. Elizabeth notices that Darcy is totally uninterested in Miss De Bourgh. (full context)
Chapter 32
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The next morning, Elizabeth is surprised by a visit from Darcy. Conversation is awkward, and they struggle to avoid awkward silences. Elizabeth asks Darcy about suddenly... (full context)
Chapter 33
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When she goes on walks in the countryside near Rosings, Elizabeth keeps running into Darcy by chance. During one meeting, he questions her about Charlotte's happiness and about her own... (full context)
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...As they talk, he tells her that as a younger son, he has concerns that Darcy does not have: for instance, about having to marry for money. Elizabeth blushes. (full context)
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During the same conversation, Colonel Fitzwilliam relates a story about how Darcy intervened before one of his friends made an "imprudent marriage." Elizabeth realizes that Fitzwilliam is... (full context)
Chapter 34
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...Elizabeth stays behind. The doorbell rings: expecting Colonel Fitzwilliam, Elizabeth is surprised to find Mr. Darcy. (full context)
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...shock when he passionately confesses his love for her and asks her to marry him. Darcy then explains how his affection outgrew his concerns about Elizabeth and her family's inferiority. Elizabeth... (full context)
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Darcy is astonished and demands an explanation. Elizabeth blasts him for insulting her, for ruining Jane's... (full context)
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Darcy stands by his decision to break up Bingley and Jane. He is sarcastic about Wickham's... (full context)
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Elizabeth assures Darcy that he's the last man she would ever marry. Darcy leaves angrily and Elizabeth breaks... (full context)
Chapter 35
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The next day, Elizabeth takes a walk. She finds Darcy waiting for her. He gives her a letter of explanation. In the letter, Darcy answers... (full context)
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Regarding Wickham, Darcy says that after Darcy's father died, Wickham resigned his opportunity with the church in exchange... (full context)
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Years passed. Wickham saw an opportunity with Darcy's sister Georgiana, who was both rich and, at age 15, naÏve. Wickham charmed her into... (full context)
Chapter 36
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...is stunned. At first, she doesn't believe any of this information because she thinks that Darcy's tone in the letter seems unrepentant and haughty. But, upon rereading the letter, she starts... (full context)
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...also rereads the part of the letter about Jane, and realizes that she can't blame Darcy for intervening: Jane was reserved, as Charlotte had pointed out; and she must admit that... (full context)
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On returning to the parsonage house, Elizabeth learns that Darcy and Colonel Fitzwilliam had both visited to say good-bye. (full context)
Chapter 37
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Darcy and Colonel Fitzwilliam leave the next morning. Lady Catherine, now bored, requests to see Mr.... (full context)
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Elizabeth keeps thinking about Darcy's letter. She decides that she respects Darcy but hopes never to see him again. (full context)
Chapter 40
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Later, Elizabeth tells Jane how Darcy proposed to her and also shares the part of Darcy's letter about Wickham. Elizabeth says... (full context)
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...Jane's advice: should they publicize Wickham's faults? They agree not to, for the sake of Darcy and his sister. Besides, no one would believe that Darcy is actually the good guy.... (full context)
Chapter 41
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...event. He blushes when she asks if he knows Colonel Fitzwilliam. When Wickham asks how Darcy is doing, Elizabeth responds that she understands Darcy better now. Wickham gets the point, and... (full context)
Chapter 43
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...Elizabeth imagines what it would have been like to be mistress of the place as Darcy's wife. (full context)
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...Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner are escorted around the rooms by a housekeeper who praises Mr. Darcy as a kind and generous man: good to his servants, his tenants, and especially his... (full context)
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Elizabeth notices a portrait of Darcy. As she stares at it, the housekeeper asks if she thinks Darcy is handsome. Elizabeth... (full context)
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As they walk, Darcy suddenly appears—he came home a day earlier than scheduled. Elizabeth is stunned and embarrassed, but... (full context)
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Darcy says he is expecting guests the next day: Bingley and his sisters, and Georgiana. He... (full context)
Chapter 44
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The next day, Elizabeth and the Gardiners are again surprised when Darcy shows up with Georgiana and Bingley for a visit. The Gardiners note Darcy's eagerness and... (full context)
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Elizabeth is amazed at the change in Darcy. His pride has turned into tenderness. If he was embarrassed by Elizabeth's relations before, Darcy... (full context)
Chapter 45
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The next morning, Mr. Gardiner joins Bingley and Darcy to fish, and Elizabeth and Mrs. Gardiner visit the women at Pemberley. Caroline Bingley and... (full context)
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When Darcy arrives, Caroline tries to embarrass Elizabeth by bringing up her connection with Wickham. The plan... (full context)
Chapter 46
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Elizabeth meets Darcy as she is running out the door and tells him the story. Elizabeth blames herself... (full context)
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Looking serious, Darcy wishes he could offer help, and leaves. Elizabeth worries that this new disgrace to her... (full context)
Chapter 50
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As Mrs. Bennet makes plans for Lydia's wedding, Elizabeth regrets having told Darcy about the scandal. She expects him to distance himself from her now that Wickham will... (full context)
Chapter 51
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While gloating about the details of her wedding, Lydia reveals to Elizabeth that Darcy attended the ceremony. Lydia quickly apologizes: it was supposed to be a secret. Elizabeth burns... (full context)
Chapter 52
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Mrs. Gardiner sends a long reply detailing how Darcy went to London, tracked down Wickham and stopped him from abandoning Lydia and escaping to... (full context)
Chapter 53
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Not long after, however, Bingley and Darcy visit the Bennets. Mrs. Bennet gives a warm welcome to Bingley and almost none to... (full context)
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Darcy is not so congenial as he was at Pemberley, and Elizabeth doubts he has returned... (full context)
Chapter 54
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Darcy, however, sits at the far end of the table from Elizabeth, next to Mrs. Bennet,... (full context)
Chapter 55
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Bingley tells Jane that he didn't know she was in London, but—to Elizabeth's relief—he leaves Darcy out of it. Jane realizes that Caroline and Mrs. Hurst had worked against her, but... (full context)
Chapter 56
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...point: she knows of Jane's engagement; she also knows that Elizabeth has tricked her nephew, Darcy, into proposing as well. Elizabeth denies having done any such thing. Lady Catherine demands that... (full context)
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Lady Catherine is shocked at Elizabeth's nerve. She says that Darcy was always intended for her daughter, Miss De Bourgh. And that Darcy's connection to the... (full context)
Chapter 57
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Mr. Bennet thinks the rumor about Elizabeth and Darcy is hilarious because he is certain that Elizabeth hates Darcy and that Darcy is indifferent... (full context)
Chapter 58
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Only days later, Darcy comes to Longbourn with Bingley. They all go for a walk and Elizabeth and Darcy... (full context)
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Darcy says his feelings for her have not changed since his rejected proposal, and asks about... (full context)
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Darcy explains that he started to hope after Lady Catherine informed him about Elizabeth's stubborn refusal... (full context)
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Darcy regrets his first proposal to Elizabeth. He's been prideful since childhood and presumed that she... (full context)
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Darcy explains that he told Bingley the truth about Jane and advised him to return to... (full context)
Chapter 59
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Mrs. Bennet is annoyed when Darcy returns the next day with Bingley. She apologizes to Elizabeth for the inconvenience of having... (full context)
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Later Darcy visits Mr. Bennet in private to ask his consent to marry Elizabeth. Mr. Bennet calls... (full context)
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...genteel and rich—even richer than Jane! Elizabeth fears that her mother will continue to embarrass Darcy, but Mrs. Bennet, because she's intimidated, treats him with uncharacteristic respect. (full context)
Chapter 60
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Elizabeth asks Darcy how he ever fell in love with her. He points to her liveliness of mind,... (full context)
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Elizabeth writes to tell Mrs. Gardiner of her engagement, as does Darcy to Lady Catherine. Mr. Bennet writes to Mr. Collins who, along with Charlotte, soon return... (full context)
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Elizabeth tries to insulate Darcy from the foolishness of Mr. Collins, Sir William Lucas, and Mrs. Philips, but Darcy tolerates... (full context)
Chapter 61
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A year later, Jane and Bingley move into an estate near Elizabeth and Darcy at Pemberley. Mrs. Bennet, extremely proud, visits them often. Mr. Bennet misses Elizabeth and visits... (full context)
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Lydia writes to Elizabeth with congratulations and asks if Darcy could pitch in some money for them. Elizabeth is annoyed, but sends them the money... (full context)
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Even though Caroline Bingley is disappointed by Darcy's marriage, she tries to make nice with Elizabeth. Georgiana and Elizabeth get along wonderfully, just... (full context)