A Passage to India

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Adela Quested Character Analysis

A young, honest Englishwoman who comes to India to decide whether or not to marry Ronny. Adela is intrigued by India and desires to see the “real” India and befriend the locals. Later she has a horrifying experience at the Marabar Caves and accuses Aziz of assaulting her. However, at the trial she goes against her peers’ influence and admits that she was mistaken. She returns to England soon afterward.

Adela Quested Quotes in A Passage to India

The A Passage to India quotes below are all either spoken by Adela Quested or refer to Adela Quested. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Harcourt Brace Jovanovich edition of A Passage to India published in 1984.
Part 1, Chapter 5 Quotes

“You’re superior to them, anyway. Don’t forget that. You’re superior to every one in India except one or two of the Ranis, and they’re on an equality.”

Related Characters: Mrs. Turton (speaker), Adela Quested, Mrs. Moore
Page Number: 42
Explanation and Analysis:

The racism of the English towards the Indians--indeed, towards all non-English people--is clear in this passage. At a party, Mr. Turton, the political officer of the area in which the novel is set, has invited some Indian and English guests. Mrs. Turton, his wife, shows her guests Adela and Mrs. Moore through the party, noting that some Indian women are there. Turton assures Adela that she's superior to the Indians.

Why is Mrs. Turton so sure that Adela is "superior?" It's safe to assume that Mrs. Turton believes that nearly all Englishwomen are superior to the Indian people--because the English themselves are better than the Indians. Mrs. Turton embodies the worst kind of racism of the English people--a form of racism that can actually come across as a form of politeness in some situations. (Here, for instance, Mrs. Turton is complimenting her guests; it's just that her compliment hinges on certain offensive premises.) While Forster shows how the English men actually wield the power of colonialism and can make destructive decisions that affect multitudes of people, he generally portrays the English women as even worse in their casual racism--and Mrs. Turton is a prime example of this.

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Part 1, Chapter 7 Quotes

“I do so hate mysteries,” Adela announced.
“We English do.”
“I dislike them not because I’m English, but from my own personal point of view,” she corrected.
“I like mysteries but I rather dislike muddles,” said Mrs. Moore.
“A mystery is a muddle.”
“Oh, do you think so, Mr. Fielding?”
“A mystery is only a high-sounding term for a muddle. No advantage in stirring it up, in either case. Aziz and I know well that India’s a muddle.”

Related Characters: Cyril Fielding (speaker), Adela Quested (speaker), Mrs. Moore (speaker)
Page Number: 73
Explanation and Analysis:

In this famous passage, the characters discuss the differences between mysteries and muddles as it applies to the Indian world. Mrs. Moore seems to think of India as a mystery--that is to say, a problem with a potential solution, or something chaotic and confusing but with an underlying meaning to it. Fielding and Aziz (and often Forster himself) see India as more of a "muddle"--something chaotic and confusing but without an underlying meaning. This idea of the nature of the unknown as either mystery or muddle is crucial to the book, both in its "ethnographic" aspect (how to define and describe a place as vast and diverse as India) and in its dealings with spirituality, psychology, and the human experience.

Part 2, Chapter 26 Quotes

For Miss Quested had not appealed to Hamidullah. If she had shown emotion in court, broke down, beat her breast, and invoked the name of God, she would have summoned forth his imagination and generosity – he had plenty of both. But while relieving the Oriental mind, she had chilled it, with the result that he could scarcely believe she was sincere, and indeed from his standpoint she was not. For her behaviour rested on cold justice and honesty; she had felt, while she recanted, no passion of love for those whom she had wronged… And the girl’s sacrifice – so creditable according to Western notions – was rightly rejected, because, although it came from her heart, it did not include her heart.

Related Characters: Adela Quested, Hamidullah
Page Number: 272
Explanation and Analysis:

Adela has told the court the truth: she hallucinated (she now believes) her sexual assault in the Marabar Caves. By suddenly admitting this in court, Adela clears Aziz of all charges. And yet the racial tensions in the courtroom persist long afterwards; the English believe that Adela was raped, and the Indians believe that she spitefully made everything up to hurt Aziz.

Hamidullah's response to Adela's testimony in court illustrates the attitude that the Indians have toward her, and reinforces Forster's larger "ethnographic" descriptions of the English and the Indians. Hamidullah was upset that Adela was so calm and cold when she admitted that she hadn't been telling the truth. If Adela had just been more tearful and passionate when she admitted her mistake, Hamidullah would have been more forgiving to her. Instead, Adela seemed cool and calm, suggesting to the Indians (who are supposedly more emotional and imaginative) that her "heart" wasn't really in her confession. She has done the thing that was technically right, but she hasn't done it out of love or compassion--and Forster seems to agree that the Indians, not the English, take the right interpretation of the trial for now, as shown by the authorial interjection of the word "rightly" before the description of how Hamidullah rejects Adela's confession.

Part 2, Chapter 29 Quotes

“Our letter is a failure for a simple reason which we had better face: you have no real affection for Aziz, or Indians generally.” She assented. “The first time I saw you, you were wanting to see India, not Indians, and it occurred to me: Ah, that won’t take us far. Indians know whether they are liked or not – they cannot be fooled here. Justice never satisfies them, and that is why the British Empire rests on sand.”

Related Characters: Cyril Fielding (speaker), Dr. Aziz, Adela Quested
Page Number: 288-289
Explanation and Analysis:

Adela feels terrible for what she's done to Aziz: by accusing him of assault, she risked his life. Adela tries to apologize to Aziz by writing a letter to him--and yet when she reads her own letter, she decides that it seems flat and insincere. Fielding explains why Adela's writing seems to insincere: it is. This reinforces the idea of the previous passage--that Adela is technically doing the right thing, but she isn't doing out of love or compassion. She doesn't genuinely love Aziz, or any other Indian for that matter--they remain strange and foreign to her, perhaps not totally human, even though in her mind she is trying to be just towards them.

Fielding shows himself to be a keen observer of Indian culture (at least according to Forster's similar observations): he recognizes that Indian people are more honest and open with each other--unlike the English, they don't go through the motions of pretending to be polite to one another; if they don't like each other, they say so. Fielding hints that there will always be a void between India and England because the English think that a formal code of right and wrong can replace the Indians' more instinctive, automatic modes of morality and communication. Neither worldview is inherently better or worse--they're just different--but the problem arises when one system of morality and humanity is externally forced upon the other, as is the case in the colonial system.

Perhaps life is a mystery, not a muddle; they could not tell. Perhaps the hundred Indias which fuss and squabble so tiresomely are one, and the universe they mirror is one.

Related Characters: Cyril Fielding, Adela Quested
Page Number: 293
Explanation and Analysis:

In this critical passage, Adela and Cyril discuss the mysteries of India and the universe, reiterating a conversation they had earlier. Both characters are atheists, and yet they want to believe that there is some kind of higher purpose in life--they can't be satisfied with the belief that all of life is random and chaotic (a muddle, rather than a mystery).

If life is just a muddle, then it has no higher purpose. If, however, it is a mystery, then it has a solution and therefore a meaning. Adela has been deeply disturbed by the events of the trial--they've reminded her how deep the divisions in English and Indian society go. Adela wants to believe that Indians and Englishmen have something in common; by the same token, she wants to believe that all people (and perhaps all living things) are united together beneath the muddle of their lives.

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Adela Quested Character Timeline in A Passage to India

The timeline below shows where the character Adela Quested appears in A Passage to India. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1, Chapter 3
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...act. The play room is very hot, so she goes to the billiard room instead. Adela Quested, a young woman who traveled with Mrs. Moore from England, is there saying “I... (full context)
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Adela and Mrs. Moore are both slightly disappointed by their visit so far, as they have... (full context)
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...that they are English, part of an Empire occupying a foreign land. After the song Adela again asks to see the “real India.” Cyril Fielding, the principal of the Government College,... (full context)
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The ladies of the club, including Mrs. Turton and Mrs. Callendar, are amused by Adela’s desire to see Indians. They assure her that it’s best to avoid them, as all... (full context)
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...and feels a sudden sense of unity with the moon and stars. She, Ronny, and Adela ride home, and on the way Mrs. Moore points out the mosque she stopped at.... (full context)
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They stop momentarily and admire the Ganges, and then return to their bungalow. Adela goes to bed and Ronny starts interrogating his mother about Aziz. He uses phrases he... (full context)
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...Moore makes him promise not to. In exchange Ronny asks his mother to not tell Adela about Aziz. Ronny is afraid that Adela will start worrying about whether the English treat... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 5
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...side of the tennis lawn, while the English stand at the other. Mrs. Moore and Adela watch the segregation sadly. Mrs. Turton and Ronny discuss the guests, saying that “no one... (full context)
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...assumes the various self-serving reasons why each has come to the party. Mrs. Turton takes Adela and Mrs. Moore to visit the Indian women. Mrs. Turton assures the two that they... (full context)
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...women speaks up in English, and Mrs. Turton is surprised that they know the language. Adela is excited, and tries to have a conversation with the women, but they are too... (full context)
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...He even stays on the Indian side of the lawn to eat. He hears about Adela and Mrs. Moore’s friendliness to the Indians and is pleased by it. (full context)
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Mr. Fielding finds Adela and tells her that the Indians appreciated her kindness. He invites Adela and Mrs. Moore... (full context)
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Adela looks out at the Marabar Hills and suddenly starts to dread her future married life... (full context)
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After the party Adela, Ronny, and Mrs. Moore go to dinner with Miss Derek (an English employee of a... (full context)
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After the guests leave and Adela goes to bed, Ronny asks Mrs. Moore about Adela. Mrs. Moore says they’ve mostly just... (full context)
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Mrs. Moore says that Adela feels that the English are not pleasant to the Indians. Ronny dismisses this as a... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 7
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Fielding tells Aziz that Mrs. Moore and Adela are coming to tea as well, and Aziz remembers his encounter with Mrs. Moore at... (full context)
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Mrs. Moore and Adela arrive and Aziz is pleased to find that he is still able to be informal... (full context)
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Adela pronounces the situation a mystery, and says “I do so hate mysteries.” Mrs. Moore says... (full context)
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...recognizes that the “truth of mood” is more important in that moment than factual truth. Adela is fascinated by Aziz, and considers him an encapsulation of the “real India.” (full context)
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...little distance from the others, as he is of the highest Hindu caste. Aziz asks Adela if she plans to stay in India, and she spontaneously answers that she cannot do... (full context)
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...Moore asks to see the college grounds, and Fielding takes her for a tour. Aziz, Adela, and Professor Godbole remain. Adela mentions coming to Aziz’s house again, but Aziz deflects the... (full context)
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Ronny suddenly arrives, hoping to take Adela and Mrs. Moore to a polo match at the English club. He ignores the Indians... (full context)
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Ronny takes Fielding aside and scolds him for leaving Adela alone with the Indians. Fielding doesn’t see anything wrong with it, but Ronny is uncomfortable... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 8
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Adela knew Ronny in England before, but she now finds his “self-complacency” and “lack of subtlety”... (full context)
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Mrs. Moore asks to be dropped off at the bungalow, and Adela asks to go along, suddenly having no desire to watch polo or bicker more with... (full context)
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Adela feels guilty about telling strangers that she intends to leave India. After the polo match... (full context)
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Adela is surprised at how calmly and “Britishly” they’ve handled the matter. She and Ronny sit... (full context)
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The Nawab Bahadur passes by and interrupts Ronny and Adela’s conversation. He offers them a ride in his car, and Ronny accepts, despite Adela’s hesitation.... (full context)
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...to strike something and breaks down. They all climb out, wondering what caused the accident. Adela says that she saw them hit a hairy animal, and eventually they decide that it... (full context)
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...but doesn’t approve of the English working for Indians or of Miss Derek’s disparaging joking. Adela shares Ronny’s disapproval of Miss Derek’s rude manner, and their hands touch again in the... (full context)
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When they finally reach the bungalow, Adela tells Ronny that she will marry him after all. Ronny agrees, but Adela immediately feels... (full context)
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...work because it seems to prove that the British are necessary in India. Ronny and Adela describe their car accident to Mrs. Moore, who shivers and says that they must have... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 11
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Aziz half-jokingly suggests that Fielding should marry Adela, but Fielding is horrified by the idea, and calls her a “prig.” He says that... (full context)
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Aziz agrees that Adela is not right for Fielding, but he mostly disapproves of her for her lack of... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 13
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From a great distance the Marabar Hills look romantic, and at the English club Adela remarks to Miss Derek that she would have liked to have visited them with Aziz.... (full context)
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Aziz goes through a great amount of trouble inviting Mrs. Moore, Adela, Fielding, and Professor Godbole – as he wants to recreate the company of the tea... (full context)
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...servants spend the night at the train station to keep from being late. Mrs. Moore, Adela, and their servant Antony arrive first. Antony is arrogant and sneering, and stands apart from... (full context)
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...“we shall all be Moslems together now,” and Aziz is overcome with fondness for her. Adela also comforts him, and he feels that they are both “wonderful ladies,” though Mrs. Moore... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 14
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Two weeks have passed since Godbole sang his strange Hindu song, and Adela and Mrs. Moore feel like they’re living “inside cocoons,” unable to feel any strong emotion... (full context)
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As the train ride continues, Adela talks with Mrs. Moore about her future plans, and considers firing her rude servant, Antony.... (full context)
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Adela keeps discussing her plans until she notices that Mrs. Moore has fallen asleep. Mrs. Moore... (full context)
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...train seems to go past the hills, but then it stops next to an elephant. Adela and Mrs. Moore pretend to be enthusiastic about this surprise, and Aziz is proud and... (full context)
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...walk. The pale sunlight makes everything seem colorless, and there is a strange “spiritual” silence. Adela mistakes a tree branch for a snake, and Aziz and the villagers agree that it... (full context)
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The elephant reaches the Marabar Hills and stops at Kawa Dol. Mrs. Moore and Adela are somewhat disappointed by the area, and Aziz doesn’t know the area or understand “this... (full context)
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...earned their friendship. He starts to speak with Mrs. Moore about her other children until Adela interrupts. In his feelings of magnanimous hospitality Aziz compares himself to the Mughal Emperor Babur,... (full context)
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...India, which Aziz says cannot be done, as “nothing embraces the whole of India, nothing.” Adela says that she hopes there is something universal in India – not necessarily religion, but... (full context)
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Adela reminds Aziz that she is marrying Ronny, and that this will make her an “Anglo-Indian.”... (full context)
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...doesn’t want to repeat it. She declines the invitation to visit another cave, but encourages Adela to go on with Aziz to avoid disappointing him. Mrs. Moore suggests to Aziz that... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 15
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Aziz, Adela, and the guide visit several smaller caves, all of which are disappointing. Aziz is distracted... (full context)
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Adela asks Aziz if he is married, and if he has children. He says he does,... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 16
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...the sound of an automobile at the bottom of the hill. Aziz tries to find Adela, but the guide says that she went into a cave. Aziz reprimands him for not... (full context)
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Aziz is then relieved to see that Adela is down at the bottom of the hill, talking to another lady near the car.... (full context)
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...servants to escort Miss Derek from her car, but they find that Miss Derek and Adela have already left to drive back to Chandrapore. Aziz is disappointed but still happy about... (full context)
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Aziz tries to avoid the memory of Adela’s question about multiple wives, so he changes the facts in his mind, editing the story... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 17
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Mr. Turton calls Fielding into a waiting room, where he informs him that Adela has been “insulted” (probably sexually assaulted) in one of the Marabar Caves. Turton looks brave... (full context)
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Fielding withdraws his remark about Adela, but continues to protest that Aziz must be innocent. Turton, still enraged, lectures him that... (full context)
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...that night to discuss the situation. Fielding says that he will come, and asks about Adela’s health. Turton says that she is ill. He is angry that Fielding hasn’t become enraged... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 18
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Fielding arrives and McBryde gives him all the details of the case. Adela claimed that Aziz followed her into a cave and “made insulting advances.” She hit him... (full context)
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...also given her account – she was looking for the picnic spot when she saw Adela running down the side of the steep hill of Kawa Dol, alone. Miss Derek found... (full context)
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Fielding asks to see Adela, but McBryde says she is too upset and sick. Fielding states his theory that Adela... (full context)
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Fielding desperately tries to see Adela again, hoping to clear things up before the situation gets out of control, but McBryde... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 19
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...states that that evil was committed equally by Aziz, the guide, Fielding, Godbole, and even Adela herself. Every action is an expression of the entire universe. (full context)
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...is miserable and accuses Fielding of abandoning him. Fielding leaves and writes a letter to Adela, though he doesn’t expect it to reach her. He is still confused about the whole... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 20
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The English all gather at the club, feeling especially patriotic and selfless towards Adela, even though most of them hadn’t liked her before. The women especially feel a “sisterhood”... (full context)
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Major Callendar enters to inform them that Adela is recovering. He seems angry at the sight of Fielding, and tries to bait him... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 22
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Adela stays bedridden at the McBrydes’ bungalow for several days. She has been sunburned and had... (full context)
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Sometimes Adela feels that she will get over the whole incident soon, but then she breaks down... (full context)
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When Adela’s fever breaks and the cactus spines are all removed, Ronny fetches her from the McBrydes’.... (full context)
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McBryde gives Adela a letter she received from Fielding, which he has already opened. McBryde explains that Fielding... (full context)
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Adela says goodbye to Miss Derek and Mrs. McBryde, and Ronny drives her to his bungalow.... (full context)
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Adela asks Mrs. Moore to explain the echo, but Mrs. Moore refuses to clarify. She predicts... (full context)
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...leaves the room to go play “patience” (another name for the card game solitaire), and Adela starts to cry. Ronny apologizes for his mother’s behavior, but Adela is suddenly concerned with... (full context)
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Ronny assures her that she is just tired and upset, but Adela thinks she heard Mrs. Moore say “Doctor Aziz never did it” before she left the... (full context)
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Ronny calls his mother’s evidence “feeble,” but Adela suddenly wishes that she could call off the trial. She immediately takes back this suggestion,... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 23
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...and irritable herself, to the point where she is even jealous of all the attention Adela gets. But when Mrs. Moore does get any attention, she rejects it irritably. (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 24
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...in India the retreat from the sun, the source of life, results only in disillusionment. Adela has recently returned to the Christianity of her earlier years, as it seems “the shortest... (full context)
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After Mrs. Moore left, Adela has been staying with the Turtons, who have been very kind to her, though it... (full context)
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The Turtons drive Adela to the courthouse with an escort of Indian police, and on the way a few... (full context)
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Adela and the Turtons go inside, where many English are gathered in Ronny’s private room. There... (full context)
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Ronny assures Adela that Das, his Indian subordinate who is judging the case, is “all right,” though Major... (full context)
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...enter, so that they look dignified and superior. The court is crowded and hot, and Adela is overwhelmed. Her attention is captured by a lowly Indian servant, an “Untouchable,” who is... (full context)
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The English all act concerned about Adela’s health, and Callendar requests that Adela be given a seat on the platform to get... (full context)
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...the platform will intimidate the witnesses. Das agrees and requests that all the English except Adela should climb back down to the floor. Ronny approves of this, though Mrs. Turton complains... (full context)
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Despite the embarrassment for the English, Adela feels better after having seen the crowd from the platform. She tells Ronny and Mrs.... (full context)
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...was premeditated, so as to merit a harsher sentence. He describes all the events as Adela had related them, culminating with the damning evidence of the field glasses found in Aziz’s... (full context)
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Adela prepares to go up to the witness stand, and she tells her friends that she... (full context)
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McBryde questions Adela, and she retreads all her steps of that day, feeling like she is back at... (full context)
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Adela visualizes the Marabar Caves and her own memories, and she cannot locate Aziz in the... (full context)
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...enraged, while Mrs. Turton yells that no one is safe, and then screams insults at Adela. Das officially declares that Aziz should be released “without one stain on his character.” Aziz... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 25
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Adela is seen as having “renounced her own people,” and she is pulled into a mass... (full context)
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Concerned with her safety, Fielding reluctantly takes Adela to his carriage. He intends for her to ride off and return it later, but... (full context)
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...the servants are gone and the phone lines have been cut. Fielding longs to leave Adela and go celebrate with Aziz, but his conscience won’t let him leave her helpless. Fielding... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 26
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Fielding wakes up to find that he and Adela are still alone at the college. Adela wants to talk with him, but he is... (full context)
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Adela meekly accepts this possibility, and Fielding lists the options for what actually happened in the... (full context)
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Fielding explains that he thinks Adela’s hallucination was dispelled in court by re-visualizing the incident—that McBryde’s questioning somehow “exorcised” her. This... (full context)
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Adela asks Fielding what Aziz has said about her. Fielding answers awkwardly, remembering how bitterly Aziz... (full context)
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...arrives, overhearing the last part of their discussion. He is displeased to see Fielding and Adela together, and he speaks only to Fielding, refusing to even look at Adela. Adela tries... (full context)
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Adela plans to go to the Dak Bungalow, a poor lodging place, but Fielding invites her... (full context)
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Adela decides that she will try and return to the Turtons, but if they won’t take... (full context)
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When Fielding returns to fetch Adela, he says that Mrs. Moore has died at sea on the voyage to England. Hamidullah... (full context)
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...to Aziz until the next day, so as not to ruin the celebration for him. Adela then comes back inside, much to Hamidullah’s dismay. She is very upset about Mrs. Moore’s... (full context)
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Ronny comes in with Adela, looking awkward. Hamidullah is rude to him, questioning him about Mrs. Moore’s death, though Fielding... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 27
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...travel with Fielding, and promises to pay for everything once he gets his money from Adela. Fielding starts to talk, but Aziz cuts him off, knowing what he will say—that Aziz... (full context)
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...graceful Indians. After a while Fielding presses on and does advise Aziz to not make Adela pay reparations. He says that he understands her better now, and sees that she acted... (full context)
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Aziz says he can’t be merciful until he receives an apology, and then he mocks Adela for her ugliness. Fielding cuts off the conversation, saying that Aziz’s sexual snobbery is the... (full context)
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...loves Mrs. Moore, who never really did anything tangible to help him, but he hates Adela, who actually saved him. Aziz criticizes Fielding’s rational approach to emotion, comparing feelings to a... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 28
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Ronny hopes that Adela will decide to break off their engagement and leave India too. He cannot marry her... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 29
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The college stays closed for a while, and Fielding eats and sleeps at Hamidullah’s, so Adela continues to live at the college. Fielding comes to admire her for her humility and... (full context)
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...Fielding and Aziz argue more about plans for the future and about Aziz’s suit against Adela. Aziz wants Fielding to “give in to the East” and abandon the English altogether, while... (full context)
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Fielding finally starts bringing up Mrs. Moore to shame Aziz about Adela. Aziz was very upset when he learned of Mrs. Moore’s death—he wept and ordered his... (full context)
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Ronny is to be transferred to another province, and he visits Adela to break off the engagement. He then tells Fielding, and says that he has arranged... (full context)
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Adela says that she and Ronny never should have even considered marriage in the first place.... (full context)
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Adela says that only Mrs. Moore knew what really happened, though she doesn’t know how. Adela... (full context)
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Ten days later Adela leaves for England, following Mrs. Moore’s route. The servant Antony accompanies her and starts a... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 30
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...that the “savages” won’t pay Aziz enough, and he scolds Aziz again for not making Adela compensate him monetarily. Aziz is firm and confident in his decision, however, and intends to... (full context)
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Hamidullah then passes on the rumor that Fielding was having an affair with Adela while she was staying at the college. Aziz makes a joke out of this, again... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 31
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...subject back to Fielding’s trip to England, and he asks Fielding if he will visit Adela. Fielding says that he probably will, but he seems indifferent about it. Aziz suddenly says... (full context)
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...his suspicions, and soon finds himself believing that Fielding did indeed have an affair with Adela while she was at the college. (full context)
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...and displeasing. Soon Hamidullah and Mahmoud Ali are contributing to Aziz’s suspicions about Fielding and Adela, reminding him that they are “both members of a different race.” Aziz is haunted by... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 34
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...education in the more remote regions of India. He has married, and Aziz assumes that Adela is his wife. Aziz doesn’t like thinking of Fielding, “because it disturbed his life.” (full context)
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...treatment and questions about schedules and advice. Aziz tears up the note, thinking angrily of Adela still trying to see “native life.” He worries that Fielding might linger for a few... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 35
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...inside, Aziz addresses Fielding’s brother-in-law as “Mr. Quested.” Fielding is shocked, for he didn’t marry Adela, but instead married Mrs. Moore’s daughter Stella. The brother-in-law is Ralph Moore. Fielding realizes that... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 36
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...that he has known for more than a year that Fielding married Stella Moore, not Adela. Aziz almost gets angry, but Godbole reminds him that he is his “true friend” and... (full context)
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The other letter Aziz reads is from Adela to Stella. He resents the intimate tone of it, and how Fielding, Adela, Stella, Ralph,... (full context)
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...he is being so cruel to him and other English visitors. Aziz sarcastically brings up Adela, their “great friend,” but as he starts to mention the Marabar Caves his words are... (full context)
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...capsize. All four of the English fall into the warm, shallow water, scattering Ronny’s and Adela’s letters alongside the sacred props of the Procession of the God. Suddenly the festival is... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 37
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...“park-like” as England, but still slightly strange and unfamiliar. Aziz gives Fielding a letter for Adela, thanking her for her actions during the trial. He now realizes that she acted bravely,... (full context)