Brave New World

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Lenina Crowne Character Analysis

A beautiful Beta woman. She is slightly unconventional in that she has a tendency to date only one man at a time, but otherwise she never challenges her conditioning. During the novel she dates Henry Foster and Bernard Marx, but ultimately becomes obsessed with John because he does not immediately sleep with her.

Lenina Crowne Quotes in Brave New World

The Brave New World quotes below are all either spoken by Lenina Crowne or refer to Lenina Crowne. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Dystopia and Totalitarianism Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Harper Perennial edition of Brave New World published in 2006.
Chapter 6 Quotes
A gramme in time saves nine.
Related Characters: Lenina Crowne (speaker)
Page Number: 89
Explanation and Analysis:

Lenina has reflected on how strange she finds Bernard Marx; he doesn't enjoy activities such as electro-magnetic golf, preferring simple pursuits such as going for a walk. They travel to Amsterdam for a women's wrestling tournament, and in between matches go to an ice cream soma bar with "dozens" of Lenina's friends. Lenina tries to persuade Bernard to eat a soma-infused raspberry sundae by telling him "A gramme in time saves nine," but he refuses. Lenina's advice is an adaptation of the adage "A stitch in time saves nine," meaning if you solve a problem straight away it will be easier than if you put it off until later.

Lenina's version of the adage suggests that taking soma is a good solution to life's problems; however, in reality it is the opposite. Taking soma doesn't change or solve anything––instead, it just makes people forget their troubles, thus putting off problem-solving indefinitely. This attitude reflects the widespread addiction to immediate satisfaction to which all the characters in the novel are conditioned. Even Lenina's use of this phrase itself represents a kind of short-circuited thinking. Unlike Bernard, who reflects on issues using logic, Lenina simply regurgitates cliches she has learned during hypnopaedia. This explains why she finds Bernard odd, yet is not able to comprehend the reason behind his unconventional behavior.

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Chapter 8 Quotes
"O brave new world," he repeated. "O brave new world that has such people in it. Let's start at once."
Related Characters: John (the Savage) (speaker), Bernard Marx, Helmholtz Watson, Lenina Crowne
Related Symbols: Shakespeare
Page Number: 139
Explanation and Analysis:

Bernard and Lenina have travelled to the Savage Reservation, where they have witnessed a man be whipped and met John, a white man dressed as a savage. John has told Bernard what he can remember of his life story, and Bernard promises to take John and his mother, Linda, back with him to the World State. When Bernard tells John he is not married to Lenina, John joyfully exclaims, "O brave new world that has such people in it," a line from Shakespeare's play The Tempest. Because he has been raised on the Savage Reservation, John's only knowledge of the outside world comes through the works of Shakespeare, and it is fitting that he quotes from The Tempest, a play that explores the themes of exploration, colonization, and civilization.

John's love for Lenina and excitement at his initial impressions of the World State highlight the superficial appeal of the society depicted in the novel. However, as Bernard points out when he responds that John should wait to see the "brave new world" before he gets too excited, beneath this superficial appeal lies a dystopian reality. Indeed, it will take the perspective of John––an outsider––to expose the "brave new world" for what it really is. 

Chapter 13 Quotes
Put your arms around me...Hug me till you drug me, honey...Kiss me till I'm in a coma. Hug me honey, snuggly...
Related Characters: Lenina Crowne (speaker)
Page Number: 193
Explanation and Analysis:

Lenina has grown more and more in love with John the Savage, a fact that makes her friends suspicious, as it is antithetical to World State conditioning to have such strong feelings and to love only one person. At his house, the Savage confesses he loves Lenina, who is thrilled; however, when he proposes marriage, Lenina dismisses this as absurd and simply removes her clothes while singing seductively to him. The words of Lenina's song highlight the connection that the World State has created between sexual desire and the desire for the annihilation of individual identity. Intimacy is depicted as a kind of drug ("hug me till you drug me"), and Lenina seems to crave sex as a way of losing her sense of self and slipping out of consciousness.

The lyrics of the song are reminiscent of the style popular in the 1930s, when Brave New World was written. During this era, the still relatively new genre of vocal jazz combined romantic ballads, sexual innuendo, and childlike nonsense words to create songs about love, desire, and intimacy. Although the words of Lenina's song seem fairly innocent by today's standards, remember that singing explicitly about sex was still quite new when Huxley was writing, and thus would have been far more striking to readers at the time. 

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Lenina Crowne Character Timeline in Brave New World

The timeline below shows where the character Lenina Crowne appears in Brave New World. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
Dystopia and Totalitarianism Theme Icon
The Cost of Happiness Theme Icon
The group comes upon a nurse named Lenina Crowne as she inoculates future tropical workers against disease. Foster tells Lenina to meet him... (full context)
Chapter 3
Dystopia and Totalitarianism Theme Icon
Technology and Control Theme Icon
...this moment, the work shift ends at the Center. Workers head to the changing rooms. Lenina talks to her friend Fanny, who chastises her for exclusively dating Henry Foster for so... (full context)
Individuality Theme Icon
In the men's changing room, Bernard listens as Henry and another man talk about "having" Lenina. Though this way of talking is normal for World State society, it angers Bernard. (full context)
Chapter 4
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Technology and Control Theme Icon
Individuality Theme Icon
Lenina gets into an elevator to go to the roof. She spots Bernard standing behind her... (full context)
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Technology and Control Theme Icon
The Epsilon elevator operator joyfully says, "Roof!" and opens the door. Lenina runs off for her date with Henry Foster. (full context)
Individuality Theme Icon
Benito Hoover comes up to Bernard and remarks how pretty and "pneumatic" Lenina is. He offers the gloomy Bernard some soma. Bernard walks off in a huff. Benito... (full context)
Chapter 5
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On their date, after Obstacle Golf, Lenina and Henry fly past the Crematorium and discuss how nice it is that the elements... (full context)
Chapter 6
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Lenina thinks about how strange Bernard is. For instance, he prefers talking in private to playing... (full context)
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Technology and Control Theme Icon
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...the World State was full of intellectual adults and emotional children who want instant gratification. Lenina couldn't understand why Bernard would think this was bad. (full context)
Individuality Theme Icon
Bernard and Lenina travel to the Reservation, which is surrounded by an electric fence so no one can... (full context)
Chapter 7
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Industrialism and Consumption Theme Icon
Individuality Theme Icon
Lenina is shocked by the poverty and lack of modern convenience in the Reservation. The pueblo... (full context)
The Cost of Happiness Theme Icon
At an Indian dance, Lenina at first likes the drums, but is appalled when a young man comes out and... (full context)
Chapter 8
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John asks if Bernard is married to Lenina. Bernard bursts out laughing. John is overjoyed, and quotes a line from Shakespeare's The Tempest:... (full context)
Chapter 9
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Lenina, exhausted, takes six soma tablets to knock herself out for eighteen hours. (full context)
Individuality Theme Icon
Meanwhile, John goes to see Bernard and Lenina. There's no answer, and he's terrified they've left without him. He peeks through a window,... (full context)
Chapter 11
Individuality Theme Icon
One night Bernard asks Lenina to take the Savage to the Feelies (movies where all the senses are involved). Fanny... (full context)
Technology and Control Theme Icon
The Cost of Happiness Theme Icon
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...de-conditioned in an accident. It contains a lot of gratuitous sex. The Savage is appalled. Lenina doesn't understand why. Lenina tries to invite the Savage to her apartment, but he says... (full context)
Chapter 12
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Lenina leaves with the Songster. She thinks the Savage refused to come out because he doesn't... (full context)
Chapter 13
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Henry Foster thinks Lenina is acting strangely and advises her to get a V.P.S. treatment (Violent Passion Surrogate). Lenina... (full context)
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The doorbell rings at the Savage's rooms. It's Lenina. Stunned, he lets her in. She observes he doesn't seem happy to see her. He... (full context)
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The Savage says he loves her. Lenina is overjoyed. But when he mentions marriage, she doesn't understand and starts kissing him. (full context)
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As the Savage mentally steels himself against giving into lust, Lenina begins taking off her clothes. He is horrified. When she's naked but for her hat... (full context)
Chapter 18
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...and soon is left in peace. But one day the Savage has lustful thoughts for Lenina. He whips himself more viciously than ever, and a Feelie photographer who had been hiding... (full context)
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Lenina steps from a helicopter behind the crowd. The Savage rushes at her, screaming "Strumpet!" He... (full context)