Robinson Crusoe

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Robinson Crusoe Chapter 8 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Robinson learned that the year could be divided into the rainy and dry seasons. Having experienced how bad it was to be stuck outside his home during the rainy season, he took care to stock up on provisions in advance of rains. He had need of some kind of basket and notes that it is fortunate that as a young boy he would watch a basket-maker work and often helped with the craft. Using some twigs from near his smaller forest dwelling, he made some baskets.
Robinson learns how to deal with the rainy season by making the mistake of being stuck in it. All alone, he has to make his own baskets, just as he has learned to make all his own tools.
Themes
Society, Individuality, and Isolation Theme Icon
Advice, Mistakes, and Hindsight Theme Icon
One day, Robinson journeyed to the opposite end of the island from where his home was. He saw land far away across the ocean, but figured it was inhabited by savages, so that it wasn't worth trying to get there. He says that he "acquiesced to the dispositions of Providence," and accepted his life on the island.
Robinson assumes that the unknown land is inhabited by dangerous savages (though the only indigenous people he has encountered so far have been helpful). He now accepts his life on the island as determined by God's providence.
Themes
Christianity and Divine Providence Theme Icon
Strangers, Savages, and the Unknown Theme Icon
Robinson found this side of the island better than the one he had chosen to inhabit. It was full of open savannah fields with flowers and grass and had many wooded areas. He even captured a parrot which he would teach to talk to him. Although there were many more animals to hunt in this are of the island, Robinson had no desire to move, as he was attached to his new home.
Robinson realizes that he made a mistake placing his dwelling on the part of the island where he did—remember that he built his dwelling where he did because he hoped for rescue, for deliverance from the island. The parrot, which Robinson can teach to talk, offers some consolation for his lack of companions.
Themes
Society, Individuality, and Isolation Theme Icon
Advice, Mistakes, and Hindsight Theme Icon