Uncle Tom's Cabin

Uncle Tom's Cabin

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Aunt Chloe Character Analysis

Uncle Tom’s wife, Aunt Chloe is an important member of the Shelby estate. She is terribly upset when Tom is sold and finds work as a baker in Louisville, with her wages going to help buy back Tom. At the end of the novel she has earned enough money to buy Tom's freedom, only to learn that Tom has died on the Legree estate.

Aunt Chloe Quotes in Uncle Tom's Cabin

The Uncle Tom's Cabin quotes below are all either spoken by Aunt Chloe or refer to Aunt Chloe. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Bantam Books edition of Uncle Tom's Cabin published in 1981.
Chapter 4: An Evening in Uncle Tom’s Cabin Quotes

How easy white folks al’us does things!

Related Characters: Aunt Chloe (speaker)
Page Number: 24
Explanation and Analysis:

Aunt Chloe, who is married to Uncle Tom, marvels as young George Shelby, the son of the owner of the farm, tutors some of their children. Chloe is remarking here that certain things, especially reading and writing and mathematics, seem to come easier to white students than to black ones. It is this logic - which would seem to play into the idea that whites are intellectually superior to African Americans, and which is of course not the case at all - that many now find offensive in the novel. This logic, though well intended, can be seen as "paternalistic" on the part of the author - as part of a system that believes slavery is wrong because African Americans ought to be supported by society, rather than recognized fully as equals of all other persons.

Although Beecher Stowe by no means intended to be racist, and indeed believed her novel to be an important forum for social change in the United States, these components of the novel nowadays read as, at best, dated, and, at worst, as indicators of the blinkered nature of even the best intentions of many white abolitionists. 

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Aunt Chloe Character Timeline in Uncle Tom's Cabin

The timeline below shows where the character Aunt Chloe appears in Uncle Tom's Cabin. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 4: An Evening in Uncle Tom’s Cabin
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...simple, its front covered in beautiful flowers, with an interior organized around a hearth. Aunt Chloe, Uncle Tom’s devoted wife, prepares a meal for the family. She is known to be... (full context)
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
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...“Mas’r George,” the thirteen-year-old son of George Shelby. As Tom perseveres at his lessons, Aunt Chloe remarks that reading and writing, and other activities like it, come more easily to whites... (full context)
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Christianity and Christian Charity Theme Icon
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George expresses his love of Aunt Chloe’s cooking as she serves him griddle cakes. George mentions that Tom Lincon, a friend, has... (full context)
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After George has eaten his fill, Aunt Chloe and the children eat. The children run around, roughhousing, and Chloe scolds them for being... (full context)
Chapter 5: Showing the Feelings of Living Property on Changing Owners
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...her arms, quiets the old dog Bruno, and slips into the cold winter darkness. Aunt Chloe sees Eliza as she leaves, and Eliza reports the news of the impending sale, saying... (full context)
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
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...the tears any human being might on being confronted with such horrible circumstances. Eliza asks Chloe to tell George that she loves him, that she and Harry are escaping to Canada,... (full context)
Chapter 7: The Mother’s Struggle
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Back at the Shelby estate, Aunt Chloe prepares a meal for Haley and others with great care, following Mrs. Shelby’s implied desire... (full context)
Chapter 8: Eliza’s Escape
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...feels they are sly and ungentlemanly. Sam heads to Uncle Tom’s cabin and tells Aunt Chloe and the slaves assembled of Eliza’s crossing; he gives a grand and comic speech to... (full context)
Chapter 10: The Property is Carried Off
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...will find comfort in the Lord, and the Lord will protect him. Tom won’t allow Chloe to speak ill of Mr. Shelby. Tom argues, that Shelby is only doing what he... (full context)
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As Uncle Tom and Aunt Chloe eat breakfast together, Aunt Chloe can’t contain her weeping. Uncle Tom is quiet, sadly resigned... (full context)
Chapter 14: Evangeline
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...write to his family, but Tom can write only poorly and so cannot communicate with Chloe and others at home. (full context)
Chapter 19: Miss Ophelia’s Experience and Opinions (Continued)
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...rest of his life. Later, Eva tries to help Tom write a letter to Aunt Chloe. When the effort proves difficult, St. Clare steps in to help, and mails the letter... (full context)
Chapter 21: Kentuck
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...Kentucky, on the Shelby plantation, Mrs. Shelby tells her husband that Tom’s letter to Aunt Chloe has arrived. Mr. Shelby hints that business affairs have not improved much since Tom’s sale... (full context)
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As she cooks dinner, Chloe offers that she could be “let out” as a cook to another family, and her... (full context)
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
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...George arrives, pleased to have news from Tom, and eats a final meal with Aunt Chloe before she heads off to Louisville. As they eat, he writes to Tom with the... (full context)
Chapter 41: The Young Master
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...to worry—he is going to a finer place. Tom asks George not to mention to Chloe his current condition. (full context)
Chapter 44: The Liberator
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Shelby, Jr. returns home. Although Mrs. Shelby fears that something has happened to Tom, Aunt Chloe still plans for his safe return and lays out the money she has earned on... (full context)