Uncle Tom's Cabin

Uncle Tom's Cabin

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A cruel slave-catcher, Tom Loker, along with Marks, promises Haley that he will find Eliza and Harry and return the latter to Haley and selling the former into prostitution. Loker is shot by George Harris and nursed back to health by Quakers and the escapees he was sent to capture. He then experiences a change of heart and repents of his previous wickedness.

Tom Loker Quotes in Uncle Tom's Cabin

The Uncle Tom's Cabin quotes below are all either spoken by Tom Loker or refer to Tom Loker. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Bantam Books edition of Uncle Tom's Cabin published in 1981.
Chapter 8: Eliza’s Escape Quotes

Run up a bill with the devil all your life, and then sneak out when pay time comes! Boh!

Related Characters: Tom Loker (speaker)
Related Symbols: The Bible
Page Number: 75
Explanation and Analysis:

Loker, speaking to his friend Marks, who also looks for escaped slaves (like Loker does), argues an interesting and perhaps nonsensical view of human morality here. Loker believes that slavery is, of itself, not a moral thing. It is a system, instead, that relies on human cruelty and violence. It is one where humans own and exploit other human beings. Thus, catching escaped slaves is another brutal part of a brutal business. If Loker doesn't believe that his job is just or right, he also doesn't believe that it's any worse than any other aspect of the slave trade. It is simply one more component in a world that is far from any Christian ideal.

Although Loker's arguments are brutal, there is a simplicity and a clarity to them also. He does not make any claims for the moral high ground, as some defenders of slavery in the South did at the time. For this, in a very small way, Loker's views are at least comprehensible, even if they are also certainly reprehensible.

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Chapter 17: The Free Man’s Defense Quotes

But you haven’t got us. We don’t own your laws; we don’t own your country; we stand here as free, under God’s sky, as you are; and, by the great God that made us, we’ll fight for our liberty till we die.

Related Characters: George Harris (speaker), Tom Loker, Marks
Page Number: 224
Explanation and Analysis:

George delivers this speech from a mountain-top to Loker, Marks, and the very idea of a "slave-catcher" attempting to hunt down and return a human being. George has learned a great deal from the Quakers, and he has also seen awakened within him his natural inclinations and passions - George knew all along that he was more than the equal of those around him, and his engineering skill and efforts around the farm demonstrated to him that he could do, think, and say whatever he pleased.

Thus George fights back against the notion that African Americans are in any way inferior to white Americans. This chapter, coming as it does on the heels of Marie's description of African American inferiority, serves as an important juxtaposition - a reminder of the slaves and former slaves who find occupations in the North and in Canada, and who move beyond the yoke of slavery into more fulfilling lives. 

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Tom Loker Character Timeline in Uncle Tom's Cabin

The timeline below shows where the character Tom Loker appears in Uncle Tom's Cabin. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1: A Man of Humanity
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
Women Theme Icon
Home Theme Icon
...since they fetch a higher price when they’re content. Others, such as his friend Tom Loker, are crueler to slaves, and their business suffers. Haley nevertheless insists he might buy Harry... (full context)
Chapter 6: Discovery
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
Freedom Theme Icon
An older slave named Black Sam remarks on Tom’s fate with resignation and disappointment, and is then asked by the slave Andy to call... (full context)
Chapter 8: Eliza’s Escape
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
Christianity and Christian Charity Theme Icon
Women Theme Icon
Freedom Theme Icon
...flees, Haley finds a tavern and mulls his fate. He runs into his acquaintance Tom Loker, a massive and violent-looking man, and his small, mouse-like companion, Marks. Over drinks, Haley explains... (full context)
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
Christianity and Christian Charity Theme Icon
Freedom Theme Icon
Haley repeats to Loker his theory of slave-trading: always keep profits in mind, and only be as cruel as... (full context)
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
Women Theme Icon
Freedom Theme Icon
Marks proposes that he and Loker will catch the two, return Harry to Haley, and sell Eliza into enslaved prostitution in... (full context)
Women Theme Icon
Home Theme Icon
Freedom Theme Icon
...tactics that morning, since he feels they are sly and ungentlemanly. Sam heads to Uncle Tom’s cabin and tells Aunt Chloe and the slaves assembled of Eliza’s crossing; he gives a... (full context)
Chapter 14: Evangeline
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
Home Theme Icon
Freedom Theme Icon
La Belle Riviere continues down the Mississippi. Tom’s conduct has convinced Haley he is trustworthy; Tom is therefore allowed to sleep without fetters... (full context)
Chapter 17: The Free Man’s Defense
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
Home Theme Icon
Freedom Theme Icon
...an athletic and energetic man who has recently converted to Quakerism. Fletcher brings news that Loker, Marks, and their gang are approaching the Quaker settlement. The Quakers plan to get leave... (full context)
Freedom Theme Icon
...on horseback named Michael reports that eight to ten of the capturing forces, led by Loker, are close behind. Michael takes the wagon and rides away, as a distraction and to... (full context)
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
Christianity and Christian Charity Theme Icon
Home Theme Icon
Freedom Theme Icon
Loker, Marks, and the others arrive. Fearing a violent confrontation, George mounts the embankment and delivers... (full context)
Chapter 21: Kentuck
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
Home Theme Icon
Back in Kentucky, on the Shelby plantation, Mrs. Shelby tells her husband that Tom’s letter to Aunt Chloe has arrived. Mr. Shelby hints that business affairs have not improved... (full context)
Chapter 35: The Tokens
Christianity and Christian Charity Theme Icon
Women Theme Icon
...begins in Legree’s sitting room, where he is complaining of the complications introduced by Uncle Tom’s refusal to cooperate with his demands. Cassy comes into the room and Legree believes she... (full context)
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
Christianity and Christian Charity Theme Icon
Women Theme Icon
Cassy reveals that she has come to see Legree to argue with him over Tom’s treatment. Legree feels he will eventually “break” Tom, but Cassy says it won’t be done—Tom’s... (full context)
Chapter 37: Liberty
Christianity and Christian Charity Theme Icon
Home Theme Icon
Tom Loker awakes in a Quaker household under the supervision of Aunt Dorcas, who is tending to... (full context)
Chapter 38: The Victory
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
Christianity and Christian Charity Theme Icon
Freedom Theme Icon
Legree discusses Tom’s more cheerful mood with Sambo, who suggests that Tom might wish to run away. Legree... (full context)