Uncle Tom's Cabin

Uncle Tom's Cabin

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St. Clare’s lovely and deeply religious daughter, Eva becomes close friends with after Tom rescues her from drowning. Eva and Tom study the Bible together and pray, and Eva serves as an inspiration to her father, Uncle Tom, Miss Ophelia, and other slaves in the St. Clare household. She falls ill and dies, saying that she is going to a “better place” to be home with her heavenly Father. She wishes that she might die for the sake of those she loves.

Eva St. Clare Quotes in Uncle Tom's Cabin

The Uncle Tom's Cabin quotes below are all either spoken by Eva St. Clare or refer to Eva St. Clare. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Bantam Books edition of Uncle Tom's Cabin published in 1981.
Chapter 14: Evangeline Quotes

And you shall have good times . . . . Papa is very good to everybody, only he always will laugh at them.

Related Characters: Eva St. Clare (speaker), Uncle Tom, Augustine St. Clare
Page Number: 172
Explanation and Analysis:

Evangeline (Eva) and Augustine are two of the more interesting characters in the novel. Augustine has married a woman who does not love him, and who is cruel and harsh to their slaves. Eva is the apple of Augustine's eye - he will do anything to please her, and she is an extremely well-behaved and kind child. She is, in this sense, her father's daughter, and not her mother's.

Eva notes to Tom that Augustine is a man who wishes to treat his slaves well, who believes that they are his equals, but who also believes in social conventions to the extent that he will not free his slaves right away. Indeed, Augustine's moral evolution over the course of the middle of the novel is one of the book's most important dramatic arcs. For, though in the beginning he maintains his position in the slave system, by the end of the book he no longer believes this to be the ethical or Christian thing to do.

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Chapter 24: Foreshadowings Quotes

It’s jest no use tryin’ to keep Miss Eva here . . . She’s got the Lord’s mark in her forehead.

Related Characters: Uncle Tom (speaker), Eva St. Clare
Page Number: 313
Explanation and Analysis:

Tom and Eva grow very close as Tom continues to live in the St. Claire house. Indeed, Tom and Eva are linked as sacrificial, Christ-like figures in the narrative. Each seems almost "too good for this earth" - each is an embodiment of Christian ideals of selflessness and love of one's fellow person greater than one's self-love. Thus the reader tends to believe Tom when he recognizes in Eva this form of saintliness.

Of course, Eva's goodness, along with Tom's, really is "too good" to be true - there perhaps never has been a person as selfless as Tom or Eva. They are not meant to be characters in the novel so much as walking, breathing symbols, embodiments of Jesus's teachings. Against their example, the immoral schemings of slave-holders might better stand out. This, then, is Beecher Stowe's logic in presenting these characters are morally perfect - they underscore just how imperfect and vile the slave system in America is. 

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Eva St. Clare Character Timeline in Uncle Tom's Cabin

The timeline below shows where the character Eva St. Clare appears in Uncle Tom's Cabin. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 14: Evangeline
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...beautiful, fair-haired, blue-eyed child, dressed always in white, whom the narrator likens to an angel. Evangeline, as she is known, walks all over the vessel and smiles at the slaves, the... (full context)
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...should result in a lower price. In truth, however, St. Clare recognizes Tom’s kindness and Eva’s apparent love for him. St. Clare introduces himself to Tom and promises to make him... (full context)
Chapter 15: Of Tom’s New Master, and Various Other Matters
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The birth of Eva, however, seemed to cheer St. Clare; he gave her his mother’s name. Marie St. Clare... (full context)
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...pretends to have run of the house. Mammy serves as a cook and aid to Eva—they are very fond of one another. (full context)
Chapter 16: Tom’s Mistress and Her Opinions
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At breakfast, Marie declares to her husband, Eva, and Miss Ophelia that the slaves are really the masters of their owners, that no... (full context)
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...says educating slaves is worthless. Ophelia also criticizes St. Clare for letting Tom play with Eva; she finds this “dreadful.” St. Clare says that the two care for each other and... (full context)
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...and Beecher Stowe argues that black people are inclined to enjoy this kind of majesty. Eva offers Mammy her golden brooch as a present, since Mammy has a headache. Marie says... (full context)
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...this trade ceased to need slavery, no one would have to justify the institution anymore. Eva says she likes slavery because it means her household contains more people for her to... (full context)
Chapter 19: Miss Ophelia’s Experience and Opinions (Continued)
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...killed. Scipio was then faithful to St. Clare for the rest of his life. Later, Eva tries to help Tom write a letter to Aunt Chloe. When the effort proves difficult,... (full context)
Chapter 20: Topsy
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...past. Once, while doing chores, Miss Ophelia believes Topsy has stolen a bow belonging to Eva, and after threatening her, convinces Topsy to admit stealing it and other trinkets besides. Miss... (full context)
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Miss Ophelia wonders that St. Clare lets Eva play with Topsy—she thinks it will harm Eva’s development, but St. Clare believes Eva is... (full context)
Chapter 22: “The Grass Withereth—The Flowers Fadeth”
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...hands of his master. Tom receives George Jr.’s letter and is cheered by its contents. Eva and Tom grow closer, and the two of them take turns reading the Bible together,... (full context)
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Reading from the Bible at the St. Clare summer home on Lake Ponchartrain, Eva believes she sees the lake as a “sea of glass mingled with fire,” words from... (full context)
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Miss Ophelia confides in St. Clare that she fears Eva is getting sick, and he responds that he’s not convinced, but privately he fears that... (full context)
Chapter 23: Henrique
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...Henrique. Henrique is a handsome, difficult, and aristocratic child who is enamored of his cousin Eva. Henrique’s slave Dodo brings around the boy’s horse, and though Dodo cleaned it earlier, the... (full context)
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Eva and Henrique return from riding, and Augustine is concerned that his daughter has ridden too... (full context)
Chapter 24: Foreshadowings
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After their holiday on Lake Ponchartrain, Eva grows sicker. Marie initially does not believe Miss Ophelia’s reports that Eva is unwell, thinking... (full context)
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Eva’s condition appears to improve for a time, although Miss Ophelia and the doctor do not... (full context)
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Eva tells this also to her father, who grows very upset. She asks him, too, why... (full context)
Chapter 25: The Little Evangelist
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...she is sick, and she needs a better doctor than the one who cares for Eva to attend to her. Eva, Tom, and Miss Ophelia return from a Methodist prayer service... (full context)
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Eva, however, speaks to Topsy and asks her why she misbehaves. Topsy says no one can... (full context)
Chapter 26: Death
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Despite having appeared to improve in recent weeks, Eva enters another downturn. Marie thinks that Topsy has stolen flowers from the house, but really... (full context)
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Marie tells Eva to wait before believing that Topsy has changed. Eva asks her mother whether she thinks... (full context)
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...life, with his daughter’s coming death being the most severe. Although St. Clare questions how Eva can love Jesus without having proof of his existence, Eva says that she believes in... (full context)
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Tom and Miss Ophelia sense that Eva will die soon. For her part, Eva seems content. Tom, St. Clare, and the family... (full context)
Chapter 27: “This Is the Last of the Earth”
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The St. Clare house is in mourning, and Adolph and Rosa have shrouded Eva’s room in white, where she lies. Topsy comes to pay her respects, and Miss Ophelia,... (full context)
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...returns to town and to his normal activities, but he has been emotionally devastated by Eva’s death. Mammy worries about him. Marie claims he never cared for Eva at all. Tom... (full context)
Chapter 28: Reunion
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Miss Ophelia is “softened” after Eva’s death, and Topsy has taken to reading a collection of Bible passages Eva gave her... (full context)
Chapter 32: Dark Places
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...believe that the Lord could abide with them there. Tom has a pleasant dream of Eva reading the Bible near Lake Ponchartrain and wonders if she has visited him in his... (full context)
Chapter 35: The Tokens
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...says it won’t be done—Tom’s faith is too strong. Sambo arrives, showing the lock of Eva’s hair that Tom has kept, and claiming that it is a form of witchcraft. Fearful,... (full context)
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Legree is shaken by the coincidence of Eva’s and his mother’s hair-locks, thinking that the hair recovered from Tom might be his mother’s... (full context)