Uncle Tom's Cabin

Uncle Tom's Cabin

Pdf fan dd71f526917d6085d66d045bd94fb5b55d02a108dd45d836cbdd4abe2d4c043d Tap here to download this LitChart! (PDF)
The Bible Symbol Icon
The Bible is both a practical item in the novel—it is the only book Uncle Tom owns—and a symbol for the endurance of his, and other’s, Christian faith. Tom manages to keep his Bible from the hands of Simon Legree, and throughout his trials, as he moves from the Shelby estate to St. Clare’s home to the Legree plantation, the Bible is a source of comfort and strength. Tom forms bonds with Eva, Cassy, George Shelby, St. Clare, and other characters when they read the Bible together. And, of course, the Bible provides the religious wisdom enabling Tom to withstand his brutal treatment at the hands of Legree. Tom’s ability to read the Bible despite his circumstances gives hope to those who struggle with their faith, including St. Clare and Cassy.
Get the entire Uncle Tom's Cabin LitChart as a printable PDF.
Uncle tom s cabin.pdf.medium

The Bible Symbol Timeline in Uncle Tom's Cabin

The timeline below shows where the symbol The Bible appears in Uncle Tom's Cabin. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 4: An Evening in Uncle Tom’s Cabin
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
Christianity and Christian Charity Theme Icon
Home Theme Icon
Freedom Theme Icon
George agrees to read a Bible passage for the meeting, and soon a large group of slaves from the plantation have... (full context)
Chapter 11: In Which Property Gets into an Improper State of Mind
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
Christianity and Christian Charity Theme Icon
Home Theme Icon
Freedom Theme Icon
...Wilson warns George that the venture is risky, unlawful, and against the word of the Bible. He quotes the example of Hagar returning to her mistress. George replies that he is... (full context)
Chapter 12: Select Incident of Lawful Trade
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
Freedom Theme Icon
...has been to Tom—loosening his manacles—despite being tricked by slaves before. Tom, meanwhile, remembers a Bible verse in which God “hath prepared for us a city” (heaven). Haley spots a newspaper... (full context)
Chapter 14: Evangeline
Christianity and Christian Charity Theme Icon
Home Theme Icon
Freedom Theme Icon
Tom takes out his Bible and reads, haltingly, “In my Father’s house there are many mansions . . . .”... (full context)
Chapter 16: Tom’s Mistress and Her Opinions
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
Christianity and Christian Charity Theme Icon
Women Theme Icon
Home Theme Icon
Freedom Theme Icon
...it means her household contains more people for her to love. She tells of her Bible studies and singing with Tom, and St. Clare relates that Tom has begun praying for... (full context)
Chapter 20: Topsy
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
Christianity and Christian Charity Theme Icon
Miss Ophelia tries to teach Topsy the Bible, but Topsy learns the passages only by rote, and perhaps willfully misunderstands them, in order... (full context)
Chapter 22: “The Grass Withereth—The Flowers Fadeth”
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
Christianity and Christian Charity Theme Icon
Home Theme Icon
...contents. Eva and Tom grow closer, and the two of them take turns reading the Bible together, with Eva enjoying “Revelations and the Prophecies the most.” (full context)
Christianity and Christian Charity Theme Icon
Women Theme Icon
Home Theme Icon
Freedom Theme Icon
Reading from the Bible at the St. Clare summer home on Lake Ponchartrain, Eva believes she sees the lake... (full context)
Chapter 23: Henrique
Women Theme Icon
...Henrique responds that one may “like but not love” one’s servants. Eva says that the Bible asks people to love all humankind. Henrique promises that he will try to love all,... (full context)
Chapter 24: Foreshadowings
Christianity and Christian Charity Theme Icon
Home Theme Icon
Freedom Theme Icon
...although Miss Ophelia and the doctor do not believe it. Eva finds comfort in the Bible, believing she is returning “home” to Jesus, but she acknowledges that she will miss her... (full context)
Chapter 26: Death
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
Christianity and Christian Charity Theme Icon
Women Theme Icon
...family into her room, asking them to care for their eternal souls and follow the Bible’s teachings. The slaves in particular are struck by her speech and sob intensely. Eva distributes... (full context)
Chapter 28: Reunion
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
Christianity and Christian Charity Theme Icon
Freedom Theme Icon
St. Clare’s personality changes: he begins reading the Bible and attempts to increase his oversight of household activities. He promises to set Tom free... (full context)
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
Christianity and Christian Charity Theme Icon
Women Theme Icon
Home Theme Icon
Freedom Theme Icon
...Ophelia is “softened” after Eva’s death, and Topsy has taken to reading a collection of Bible passages Eva gave her before her death. Miss Ophelia wishes to “purchase” Topsy so that... (full context)
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
Christianity and Christian Charity Theme Icon
Freedom Theme Icon
St. Clare reads Tom a Bible passage from Matthew ending, “Inasmuch as ye did it not to one of the least... (full context)
Chapter 32: Dark Places
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
Christianity and Christian Charity Theme Icon
Freedom Theme Icon
...Lord could abide with them there. Tom has a pleasant dream of Eva reading the Bible near Lake Ponchartrain and wonders if she has visited him in his sleep. (full context)
Chapter 38: The Victory
Slavery and Race Theme Icon
Christianity and Christian Charity Theme Icon
Freedom Theme Icon
...even though he is still gravely injured. Tom finds it increasingly hard to read the Bible in his minimal spare time. (full context)