Burial Rites

Assistant Reverend Thorvardur Jónsson (Tóti) Character Analysis

Tóti is the son of Reverend Jón, an Assistant Reverend, and Agnes's spiritual advisor. Having recently completed his studies in the South of Iceland, Tóti is very well read. Tóti is called upon to serve as Agnes's spiritual advisor per Agnes's request. Young and inexperienced, Tóti deviates from expectations as he ministers to Agnes, resulting in scrutiny from Blöndal and other characters. Tóti becomes Agnes's friend as he encourages her to talk about her past and even seems at some points to harbor romantic feelings towards her.

Assistant Reverend Thorvardur Jónsson (Tóti) Quotes in Burial Rites

The Burial Rites quotes below are all either spoken by Assistant Reverend Thorvardur Jónsson (Tóti) or refer to Assistant Reverend Thorvardur Jónsson (Tóti). For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Back Bay Books edition of Burial Rites published in 2014.
Chapter 1 Quotes

As he traveled over the north peninsula with its thin lip of ocean on the horizon, the clouds began to clear and the soft red light of the late June sun flooded the pass…The dread that Tóti had felt so firmly lining his stomach dissipated as he fell into a quiet appreciation of the countryside before him.
We are all God’s children, he thought to himself. This woman is my sister in Jesus, and I, as her spiritual brother, must guide her home… “I will save her,” he whispered.

Page Number: 33
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation long mobile

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other Burial Rites quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!
Chapter 4 Quotes

To know what a person has done, and to know who a person is, are very different things…It’s not fair. People claim to know you through the things you’ve done, and not by sitting down and listening to you speak for yourself. No matter how much you try to live a godly life, if you make a mistake in this valley, it’s never forgotten…Who was she really?…she made mistakes and others made up their minds about her. People around here don’t let you forget your misdeeds. They think them the only things worth writing down.

Page Number: 103-104
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

“No such thing as truth,” Agnes said, standing up. Tóti stood up also…“There is truth in God,” he said, earnestly, recognizing an opportunity to do his spiritual duty. “John, chapter eight, verse thirty-two: ‘And ye…’”
“‘Shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free.’ Yes, I know. I know,” Agnes said. She bundled her knitting things together… “Not in my case, Reverend Thorvardur,” she called to him. “I’ve told the truth and you can see for yourself how it has served me.”

Related Characters: Agnes Magnúsdottir (speaker), Assistant Reverend Thorvardur Jónsson (Tóti) (speaker)
Page Number: 105-106
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Chapter 5 Quotes

I’ll tell you something, Reverend Tóti. All my life people have thought I was too clever…That’s exactly why they don’t pity me. Because they think I’m too smart… to get caught up in this by accident. But Sigga is dumb and pretty and young, and that is why they don’t want to see her die…They see I’ve got a head on my shoulders, and believe a thinking woman cannot be trusted. Believe there’s no room for innocence. And like it or not, Reverend, that is the truth of it.

Page Number: 126
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Chapter 7 Quotes

“Why not Sigga?” Tóti asked in a small voice.
Blöndal shook his head. “The maid of sixteen who burst into tears as soon as I summoned her? Sigga didn’t even attempt to lie—she is too simple-minded, too young to know how. She told me everything. How Agnes hated Natan, how Agnes was jealous of his attentions to her. Sigga is not bright, but she saw that much.”

Page Number: 161
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

Tóti nodded, and slowly picked up the swan feather… “You mean to make an example of her,” he said quietly.
“I mean to deliver God’s justice here on earth,” Blöndal said, frowning. “I mean to honor the authorities who have appointed me by fulfilling my duty as a lawkeeper.”
…“I hear that you have appointed Gudmundur Ketilsson as executioner.”
…“I do not have to explain my decisions to you, Reverend. I am not accountable to parish priests. I am accountable to Denmark. To the King…We are not her to discuss my performance. We are here to discuss yours.”

Page Number: 164-165
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

When I was sixteen years old I dreamt that I was walking barefoot in a lava field…In every direction there was nothing but rock and snow, and great chasms and crack in the ground…Just when I thought I would die from fear, a young man appeared …and even though I was still terrified, I had his hand in mine, and it was a comfort. Then suddenly, in my dream, I felt the ground give way beneath my feet…and I fell into a chasm…I was dropped into the earth, buried in silence, and it was unbearable, and then I woke.

Page Number: 175
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Get the entire Burial Rites LitChart as a printable PDF.
Burial rites.pdf.medium

Assistant Reverend Thorvardur Jónsson (Tóti) Character Timeline in Burial Rites

The timeline below shows where the character Assistant Reverend Thorvardur Jónsson (Tóti) appears in Burial Rites. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
In the next letter of the chapter, Björn Blöndal writes to Assistant Reverend Thorvardur Jónsson (Tóti). First, he extends his congratulations to Tóti for completing his studies. Then, Blöndal tells Tóti... (full context)
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Class, Colonization, and Hierarchies of Power Theme Icon
...one of them, Agnes Magnúsdottir, is being moved from Stóra-Borg to Kornsá. Agnes has requested Tóti for spiritual guidance, which is why Blöndal is writing to him. Blöndal conveys his hesitation,... (full context)
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
After Blöndal’s letter, the novel begins a third-person narrative, which opens with Tóti’s father, Reverend Jón, walking into their house and telling him that a messenger has arrived.... (full context)
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Literacy, Language, and the Icelandic Landscape Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Tóti finds Reverend Jón in the communal bedroom (the badstofa), and gives him the letter to... (full context)
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
The narrative changes again to the third person, which now follows Tóti as he leaves church. He accepted Blöndal’s offer to visit Agnes a month ago, and... (full context)
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Tóti asks his father if he thinks he is ready, and Reverend Jón tells him that... (full context)
Literacy, Language, and the Icelandic Landscape Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Tóti prepares his horse and rides towards Kornsá, rehearsing what he will say to Agnes and... (full context)
Chapter 2
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
The narrative changes back to third-person to describe Tóti standing in the doorway with Margrét, watching the group of riders arrive with Agnes. Tóti... (full context)
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Margrét points out a flock of ravens to Tóti and asks if he is a man of tradition. Tóti responds yes, but only if... (full context)
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
A rider reaches the edge of the homestead, dismounts, and greets Margrét and Tóti. He tells Margrét that Agnes will not cause any trouble, and they will stay there... (full context)
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
...longer a woman” because she is so malnourished that she no longer gets her period. Tóti approaches Agnes and introduces himself. Agnes seems to recognize him, but Tóti does not recognize... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
The narrative then jumps to Tóti, who arrives back at his father’s house on horseback. After taking care of his horse,... (full context)
Chapter 3
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
The narrative switches back to third-person and follows Tóti as he completes chores and gets ready to head to Kornsá again. As Reverend Jón... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
The narrative, still in third person, cuts to Tóti, who, having arrived at Kornsá, is sitting with Agnes outside the house and asking if... (full context)
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Agnes tells Tóti that they have met before, but Tóti is confused because he doesn’t remember her whatsoever.... (full context)
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
A few ravens land on the stone fence nearby and Margrét chases them away. Tóti takes a breath and recites a rehearsed speech about how, if Agnes does want him... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
...alongside Margrét. They work silently, and Agnes thinks that she made a mistake in asking Tóti, who is practically a boy, to coach her through her impending death. Agnes thinks the... (full context)
Chapter 4
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
The third person narrative resumes to follow Tóti after he leaves Kornsá, feeling unsuccessful. He intends to write a letter to Blöndal relinquishing... (full context)
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
The next morning as he milks the cow, Tóti thinks about his father’s comment and wonders what he could possibly do for Agnes and... (full context)
Literacy, Language, and the Icelandic Landscape Theme Icon
When Tóti does ride to Kornsá, he passes through the same stunning, misty landscape that he did... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Haukur goes to fetch the Reverend while Tóti waits, and Haukur’s wife comes into the badstofa and introduces herself as Dagga. She asks... (full context)
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Gudrún says that Natan was a sorcerer named Satan who deserved his end. Tóti asks what she means, and Dagga tells him that Gudrún believes a rumor that Natan’s... (full context)
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Class, Colonization, and Hierarchies of Power Theme Icon
Dagga asks what brings Tóti to the area. Tóti explains that he is Agnes’s priest and that he has come... (full context)
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
The narrative then cuts to Tóti and Reverend Pétur in the local church. Reverend Pétur is trying to unlock the chest... (full context)
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
The two men find Agnes’s entry in the record book. Tóti takes interest in the fact that Agnes’s parents were not married. Agnes was confirmed at... (full context)
Class, Colonization, and Hierarchies of Power Theme Icon
The narrative jumps to when Tóti eventually arrives at Kornsá and Margrét opens the door to welcome him in. They make... (full context)
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Class, Colonization, and Hierarchies of Power Theme Icon
Tóti hears Agnes say his name as she enters the room to get her knitting. Tóti... (full context)
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Class, Colonization, and Hierarchies of Power Theme Icon
Tóti asks Agnes how she likes being at Kornsá. Agnes says the family tolerates her. Tóti... (full context)
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
...eat the meat out superstition that it was tainted by the devil. Agnes wonders if Tóti sees her like the two-headed lamb— interesting, but evil. (full context)
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Class, Colonization, and Hierarchies of Power Theme Icon
The third person narrative resumes, describing Tóti riding to Kornsá the next morning. He passes Blöndal’s house and wonders how Agnes felt... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
The narrative jumps to Tóti and Agnes sitting next to the stream near Kornsá, because Agnes prefers to talk outside.... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Class, Colonization, and Hierarchies of Power Theme Icon
Tóti asks about Agnes’s father, and Agnes tells him that her real father was Jón of... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
The narrative switches back to Agnes’s first person perspective as she thinks that Tóti’s attempt to learn about her in the ministerial book was useless, since the facts do... (full context)
Chapter 5
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
...Agnes is like and Margrét tells Ingibjörg that Agnes is quiet, but she talks to Tóti when he visits. Margrét mentions that Agnes’s mother was Ingveldur, who was known for being... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Class, Colonization, and Hierarchies of Power Theme Icon
...is actually a prisoner. Soon, winter and her execution will arrive. Agnes worries about whether Tóti can help her and thinks how hard it has been to make him understand her.... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
...Agnes worries that Jón and Margrét will be mad at her. Steina asks Agnes what Tóti comes to talk about and Agnes snaps that it is her own business. Steina tells... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
The narration changes back to the third-person and jumps to Tóti, who is at his house and who has just received a letter from Jón asking... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
The two men ride together the rest of the way to Kornsá, where Tóti finds Agnes handcuffed and in bed. He asks Agnes what happened and Agnes tells him... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Margrét, Lauga, Steina, and Kristín enter the badstofa to talk amongst themselves while Tóti and Agnes converse. Margrét removes Agnes’s handcuffs at Tóti’s request. Once the other women are... (full context)
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Literacy, Language, and the Icelandic Landscape Theme Icon
Tóti asks Agnes if there is anyone from her past that he can bring to talk... (full context)
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Tóti notices that the other women have stopped knitting to listen. He changes the subject to... (full context)
Chapter 6
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Literacy, Language, and the Icelandic Landscape Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
The narrative then returns to Agnes’s first-person perspective as she begins to tell Tóti about Inga’s death. It was winter. Agnes had been living at Kornsá for several years... (full context)
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Agnes, back in the present, wants to ask Tóti if she is now going to be executed as punishment for saying she wanted to... (full context)
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
The narrative switches to the third person as Tóti asks what happened next. Agnes tells him that after Inga died and the storm ended,... (full context)
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
...seems to have been a dream, however, as no one else is awake. She whispers Tóti’s name, since he is sleeping in the badstofa with her. Agnes then begins to tell... (full context)
Chapter 7
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
...much freedom as a child. This testimony is followed by a letter from Blöndal to Tóti, asking to meet with him next week to deliver a report on Agnes’s spiritual progress. (full context)
Class, Colonization, and Hierarchies of Power Theme Icon
The chapter then resumes its third-person narrative as Tóti arrives at the Blöndal homestead to give his report. He greets Blöndal and his servants... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Blöndal dismisses Karitas and brings Tóti to his study. Tóti begins to give his report on Agnes and Blöndal expresses surprise... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Literacy, Language, and the Icelandic Landscape Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Class, Colonization, and Hierarchies of Power Theme Icon
Blöndal draws Tóti’s attention to a jar of swan feather quills on his bookshelf. He offers Tóti one... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
...door and brings in food and coffee, interrupting the conversation. As Blöndal eats, he tells Tóti that his methods show his inexperience. Blöndal describes the murders in detail to try to... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Class, Colonization, and Hierarchies of Power Theme Icon
Tóti points out that Agnes did not actually kill them, but Blöndal thinks that Agnes killed... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Blöndal then begins to tell Tóti about Fridrik’s spiritual process. When he was first arrested, Fridrik was violent and vulgar. After... (full context)
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Class, Colonization, and Hierarchies of Power Theme Icon
Blöndal asks if Agnes is similarly repentant, and Tóti tells him she does not talk about repentance. Blöndal tells Tóti that moral boundaries have... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Tóti leaves Blöndal’s office, now doubting Agnes’s words. Karitas, Blöndal’s servant, then approaches Tóti and tells... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Tóti tells Karitas that he knows opinions about Natan are divided. Karitas tells him that Blöndal... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
The narrative switches back to the third person as Tóti walks into the kitchen and asks Agnes if she is going to be joining them.... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Tóti tells Agnes that he talked with Blöndal. He tells her that Blöndal wants them to... (full context)
Literacy, Language, and the Icelandic Landscape Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Agnes reminds Tóti that she asked him to be her priest because, as she said earlier, she had... (full context)
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Agnes tells Tóti that, when he helped her cross the river, she recognized him and knew they would... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Tóti asks Agnes to tell him about Natan, and Agnes says that she met Natan when... (full context)
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Agnes tells Tóti that, although Jóas liked working on the farm, his friends were troublemakers. Jóas and Agnes... (full context)
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Literacy, Language, and the Icelandic Landscape Theme Icon
Class, Colonization, and Hierarchies of Power Theme Icon
...María was her first friend, since Agnes generally preferred reading to socializing. As Agnes talks, Tóti remembers for the first time helping Agnes across the river. He thinks that Agnes is... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Literacy, Language, and the Icelandic Landscape Theme Icon
Tóti asks Agnes if she writes poems, and Agnes says that, unlike Rósa, she does not... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
The narrative switches back to Agnes’s first person perspective as she thinks that Tóti is probably wondering about the nature of her relationship with Natan. Agnes thinks it is... (full context)
Chapter 8
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
The narrative, still in third-person, jumps to follow Tóti as he decides to travel to Kornsá to talk with Agnes despite the bad weather.... (full context)
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Class, Colonization, and Hierarchies of Power Theme Icon
The narrative jumps to Agnes and Tóti sitting in the badstofa as Agnes tells him that, after first meeting Natan, Agnes did... (full context)
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Tóti asks if she is talking about the same Pétur that was murdered when Natan was,... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Jón tells Lauga to let Tóti speak with Agnes without interference. This infuriates Lauga, who says that it is Agnes who... (full context)
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
...to be careful, and that she was worried for her. Suddenly Jón interrupts and asks Tóti to speak with Agnes away from his family. Tóti says that, unfortunately, their discussion cannot... (full context)
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Class, Colonization, and Hierarchies of Power Theme Icon
Tóti and Agnes resume their talk. Agnes says she thought that María was jealous because Agnes... (full context)
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Class, Colonization, and Hierarchies of Power Theme Icon
...to Agnes’s first-person perspective as she describes how sometimes her mouth aches after talking with Tóti. No matter what she says to him, though, it is impossible for him to understand... (full context)
Chapter 9
Literacy, Language, and the Icelandic Landscape Theme Icon
...“a poet.” The chapter then resumes the third-person narrative, starting the day after Agnes and Tóti’s last meeting. Tóti is still at Kornsá because the weather is not good. While fixing... (full context)
Literacy, Language, and the Icelandic Landscape Theme Icon
Agnes then describes Sigga showing her the farm. Agnes tells Tóti that the farm was next to the mountain on one side and the shore on... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
...the badstofa with Reverend Pétur Bjarnason, who has come to register them with the parish. Tóti introduces the Reverend to Agnes, who identifies herself as “Agnes Jónsdóttir.” Lauga, thinking she is... (full context)
Literacy, Language, and the Icelandic Landscape Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
...Christianity. Afterward, Reverend Pétur speaks with Agnes. Reverend Pétur then thanks them and says goodbye. Tóti walks him out. On the way, he asks Reverend Pétur what he wrote about Agnes.... (full context)
Literacy, Language, and the Icelandic Landscape Theme Icon
The narrative switches back to the third person. Agnes resumes telling Tóti about her first days at Natan’s farm. Natan had been happy that she was there.... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
It was an isolated life, but Agnes loved Natan and tolerated Sigga. Agnes asks Tóti if Sigga had been granted her appeal. Tóti is unsure. Agnes says that Sigga has... (full context)
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Class, Colonization, and Hierarchies of Power Theme Icon
Tóti prompts Agnes to tell him about Sigga. Agnes tells Tóti how Sigga clearly hoped to... (full context)
Chapter 10
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
The narrative switches to the third person as it describes Tóti waking up in his home and feeling very ill. Tóti gets up to get some... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Literacy, Language, and the Icelandic Landscape Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
...switches back to Agnes’s perspective as she describes the endless winter days. Agnes wonders where Tóti is, as he has not come by recently. Agnes worries that he is tired of... (full context)
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
The narrative switches back to follow Tóti. He is still very ill, and dreams feverishly that Agnes has come to visit him.... (full context)
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
The narrative changes back to Agnes’s first person perspective. She is disappointed that Tóti still hasn’t come. Winter, meanwhile, has arrived in full force. Agnes wonders if she would... (full context)
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Agnes wonders if she would tell Tóti this if he were there. She thinks about another day on Natan’s farm. Daníel and... (full context)
Chapter 11
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
...asked her about the murders, and Margrét says she thought that was between Agnes and Tóti. Margrét invites Agnes to come into the kitchen with her. (full context)
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
The narrative switches back to third person and shifts to following Tóti as he wakes up in his bed. He calls out for his father, who tells... (full context)
Chapter 13
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
The chapter then resumes its third-person narrative as it describes Tóti being woken by a knock on his door. He answers it to find a messenger... (full context)
Literacy, Language, and the Icelandic Landscape Theme Icon
The narrative jumps to Tóti’s arrival at Kornsá. Margrét greets Tóti at the door and is surprised by his sickly... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
The narrative switches to Agnes’s first person perspective as she talks with Tóti, trying to process the fact that Tóti has just told her about her execution date.... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
The narrative switches back to the third person as Tóti tries to get through to Agnes, who is staring at the floor. Jón calls for... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
The narrative returns to the third-person, describing how Tóti and Agnes both stay awake late, and then fall asleep. Margrét is still awake and... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Class, Colonization, and Hierarchies of Power Theme Icon
...execution, the family of Kornsá spends time together in the badstofa. They all watch as Tóti and Agnes hold hands and talk. Margrét pulls a chest out from under the bed.... (full context)
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
...is the first time she has done so. Lauga collapses, clearly pained by this realization. Tóti says they should go, and someone lifts Agnes onto a horse. Agnes feels like she... (full context)
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
The perspective changes back to the third-person as Tóti and Agnes ride towards the spot where Agnes will be executed. Agnes is so afraid... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Literacy, Language, and the Icelandic Landscape Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
Finally, the riders arrive at Agnes’s execution place. Tóti helps Agnes down. She is so drunk that she has trouble standing and feels she... (full context)
Truth and Liberation Theme Icon
Women, Violence, and Innocence Theme Icon
Literacy, Language, and the Icelandic Landscape Theme Icon
Names, Superstition, and Christianity Theme Icon
As the minutes go by, Tóti suggests that they pray. Agnes hears the burial hymn being sung, and she and Tóti... (full context)